Student On Probation For Expressing A Negative Opinion About An Instructor On Facebook

from the misconduct-means-saying-something-we-don't-like dept

A student at the University of Calgary was put on academic probation for making the following post on a group titled, "I no longer fear Hell, I took a course with [instructor's name]:"

[Instructor's name] IS NO LONGER TEACHING ANY COURSES AT THE U OF C!!!!! Remember when she told us she was a long-term prof? Well actually she was only sessional and picked up our class at the last moment because another prof wasn't able to do it .. lucky us. Well anyways I think we should all congratulate ourselves for leaving a [instructor's name]-free legacy for future [law and society] students.

It's pretty hard to see how this isn't just an expression of opinion, but the university thinks it qualifies as non-academic misconduct. The problem is, it's not at all clear how. The only part of the definition that doesn't involve injury, damage or theft is "conduct which seriously disrupts the lawful educational and related activities of other students and/or University staff." It's hard to see how a Facebook post of this nature "seriously disrupts" much of anything (until someone gets put on probation and the Streisand Effect kicks in). But there's a nice little "includes but is not limited to" that makes the definition non-exhaustive, which is likely what university officials are relying on. You'd think that other instances of misconduct would be similar (hurting people, breaking stuff, stealing, "serious disruptions"), but apparently "expressions of opinion that we don't like" can qualify...

A computer science professor interviewed said the posts "can be compared to putting up notices all over the university campus" (quoting the article, not the prof). But this is more like putting up a notice off campus (albeit in public). It may not have been nice, but it's pretty troubling that a student's right to express an opinion (free speech much?) on a third-party site is overridden without a clear policy violation.

I've had direct experience with this sort of thing. A couple years ago, friends of mine at another university were sent ominous emails and hauled into their department head's office over some comments about a professor on Facebook (jokes, e.g. "crazy drunk [instructor A] is better than boring stoned [instructor B]!"). The department heads argued that the comments were "visible to the community" (similar to the "notices on campus" argument), but they clearly didn't understand the context (wall post or message? profile or group?) or privacy settings, and they couldn't even locate the comments on the site (someone had copied and pasted them into an email). They, too, failed to specify how any policies were actually violated (or even which ones), yet they'd gone ahead and notified the professor of the students' comments and identities (while there was still grading to be done). We convinced them to back down and apologize, but it took a solid week, mid-semester, to deal with the mess.

Universities should understand and develop policies about social networking sites before they take action against students. If they can't be clear about what qualifies as misconduct, how can students expect to know? What's the difference between a Facebook group and study group? An email and a Facebook message? What difference do privacy settings make (hopefully some...)? How was this post on a Facebook group different from a review on RateMyProfessors.com? What's the difference between off-campus speech and speech on non-school websites? Before policing student speech off-site (problematic in and of itself), universities should at least ask these questions and develop policies first. It doesn't seem like many of them have. It's pretty ridiculous to just throw social networking under the ambiguous "but not limited to" umbrella.


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  1. icon
    RomeoSidVicious (profile), 17 Mar 2009 @ 12:20pm

    It's not just talk against profs either...

    SOURCE: http://news.cnet.com/8301-13578_3-9795510-38.html

    "A Minnesota university has suspended one of its graduate students who sent two e-mail messages to school officials supporting gun rights.

    Hamline University also said that master's student Troy Scheffler, who owns a firearm, would be barred from campus and must receive a mandatory "mental health evaluation" after he sent an e-mail message arguing that law-abiding students should be able to carry firearms on campus for self-defense."

    The whole article is insane to be honest. Our institutions of higher learning are not interested in teaching our youth to think for themselves, to express those thoughts, and to defend their point of view unless it agrees with the status quo at the university.

    I didn't post this to start a discussion on gun rights because it doesn't matter what right the student was promoting or whether you agree with his viewpoint or not. He was suspended and ordered to undergo psychiatric evaluation for having his viewpoint! He was stupid in the way he worded it (Read the article) but was not threatening.

    What's even worse is the school won't even lay out all of the allegations against him or allow him to confront his accusers per their own policy.

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