Cuba Uses Linux To Stick It To The US

from the take-that-evil-capitalist-pigs dept

It looks like Fidel Castro's plan to build a Cuban software industry has paid off, somewhat: the country has announced that it's launched its own variant of Linux. The goal is to replace the Microsoft operating systems that runs most of Cuba's computers, because the government sees Windows as a security threat. Insert your own punchline there, but for Cuba, it's because it believes US authorities have access to Microsoft code, and can therefore spy on Cuba through it. That's debatable, but so is the claim from the dean of the School of Free Software at Cuba's University of Information Sciences, who says the "black holes and malicious codes" in proprietary software "doesn't happen with free software." While open-source projects often offer better security than proprietary platforms, open-source or "free" software isn't inherently more secure. But somehow it seems ideology is probably more important than facts here.
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Filed Under: cuba, linux


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  1. icon
    PaulT (profile), 13 Feb 2009 @ 6:11am

    Re: Re: If we're talking about current OS'

    Wow. Bizarro world exists in tech circles, it seems.

    UNIX was designed from the ground up with security in mind. That's why there's always been such things as enforced passwords on user accounts, best practice that includes not running as admin unless you absolutely have to, security groups, etc. You can also disable and remove pretty much anything you want in a *NIX system within reasonable bound (including the option to recompile the kernel to remove insecure components is desired).

    Windows was originally designed as a single user system. After abandoning the 9x core as being ridiculously insecure, Microsoft turned to the more secure NT kernel but also made a number of horrific security errors (including insecure services being enabled by default and encouraging the constant use of admin accounts) that led to various different worms and virii being possible. It's only with Windows 7 that they finally seem to be correctly enforcing security on users. Server systems have been more secure, but to say that Microsoft has a history of coming close to a *NIX level of security until recently is a joke.

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