Wishing For A Mental Rewind Button

from the changes-in-perception dept

In a recent blog post by Scott Adams, he notes his desire for a rewind button on life. The post starts out by talking about seeing something through a window that he didn't quite catch, and wishing for a rewind button on the window -- like a DVR (the post then goes off on an angry tangent about auto repair these days that doesn't actually seem connected to the rewind part). That struck me as interesting, because I've caught myself wanting the same thing recently. The more I've used a DVR, the more I get annoyed at things that don't have such a capability. For example, when listening to the radio or just talking to people, there are moments when I find my brain asking to rewind, in part because it's become so accustomed to the possibility of rewinding TV. I wonder if this will lead to more demand for devices that record everything you see. Traditionally, such "backup brain" devices have been talked about for the purposes of recalling and categorizing stuff -- but if there's increasing demand to simply replay what you just heard or saw, it could become useful in unexpected ways.

Reader Comments

Subscribe: RSS

View by: Time | Thread


  1. icon
    jeadly (profile), 28 Jan 2009 @ 5:12am

    Similarish

    When reading paper books I find myself wanting to right-click to Google a term or ctrl+F to search for text on the page. I think this is an increasing trend of tech withdrawal when confronted with classic technologies that used to be adequate.

Add Your Comment

Have a Techdirt Account? Sign in now. Want one? Register here
Get Techdirt’s Daily Email
Use markdown for basic formatting. HTML is no longer supported.
  Save me a cookie
Follow Techdirt
Techdirt Gear
Shop Now: I Invented Email
Advertisement
Report this ad  |  Hide Techdirt ads
Essential Reading
Techdirt Deals
Report this ad  |  Hide Techdirt ads
Techdirt Insider Chat
Advertisement
Report this ad  |  Hide Techdirt ads
Recent Stories
Advertisement
Report this ad  |  Hide Techdirt ads

Close

Email This

This feature is only available to registered users. Register or sign in to use it.