Is It Really Big News That TV Folks Have Discovered The Internet?

from the only-if-to-note-that-it-sure-took-them-long-enough dept

A few weeks ago, there was a lot of buzz around Dr. Horrible's Sing-Along Blog, a short series of internet video, created by director Joss Whedon, and using a few well-known actors. We had a ton of people submit it, and the press went nuts over it. While I actually enjoyed the videos, I had a difficult time understanding why this was big news. Plenty of people create online videos -- some more professional than others. About the only thing that could be said for the story was "A few TV people discover the internet... years after everyone else."

And yet, now we're seeing more stories along those lines. The NY Times notes how a bunch of Saturday Night Live writers and cast members spent the summer creating their own comedy short video as well, and the story is basically the same: TV people discover the internet. In both cases, the push wasn't that "hey, the internet is actually a good platform for video" but the silly writers' strike had them bored, so they focused on creating stuff for the internet.

Again, I'm not entirely sure why this is seen as a big deal. TV people recognize what plenty of others have recognized for years, and it's suddenly newsworthy? If anything, the news peg here is that it sure has taken these TV folks a long time to realize that producing content for the internet makes sense.

Filed Under: internet, professional content, tv, video


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  1. icon
    Paul Watson (profile), 14 Aug 2008 @ 4:38am

    Re:

    Hi b!x

    "There were technical glitches at launch that geographically hobbled the Hulu stream (then fixed by Hulu's coders staying up all night to do so)"

    The Hulu stream is still hobbled - it shows a message saying "We're sorry, currently our video library can only be streamed within the United States".

    There's a link to find out more, which leads to an FAQ answer saying:

    "For now, Hulu is a U.S. service only. That said, our intention is to make Hulu's growing content lineup available worldwide. This requires clearing the rights for each show or film in each specific geography and will take time. We're encouraged by how many content providers have already been working along these lines so that their programs can be available over the Internet to a much larger, global audience. The Hulu team is committed to making great programming available across the globe."

    So the problem is definitely Old Media "rights/distribution" issues - albeit the fault of teams of lawyers representing old media companies that have crippled Hulu to force them to fit their old view of the world, rather than a specific decision by Whedon & Co.

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