Who's More Ethical: TorrentSpy Or The MPAA?

from the just-a-simple-question dept

Wired has an interview with Robert Anderson, the guy who hacked into TorrentSpy's servers and handed over a bunch of internal TorrentSpy info to the MPAA. From the interview, it's quite clear that the MPAA knew that it was getting access to content that had not been legally obtained, but it still pushed Anderson for more such info (including asking him if he could obtain similar info about The Pirate Bay). Yet, because they know how to cover themselves legally, they made Anderson sign a contract saying that all of the info he gave them had been obtained legally. But, still, it's quite clear that the MPAA has no qualms spying on people using questionable means. At the same time, however, we've noted that TorrentSpy is so aghast at the idea of spying on its own users, that it shut off US access to its site to protect its users from court-ordered spying. So, which organization comes across as more ethical here? The MPAA, who's actively trying to get confidential information from various torrent tracker sites? Or TorrentSpy, who's actively trying to protect the privacy of its users? Yet, why is it that people act as if the MPAA has the moral high ground here?

Filed Under: bittorrent, hacking, spying
Companies: mpaa, torrentspy


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  1. icon
    Killer_Tofu (profile), 24 Oct 2007 @ 5:37am

    Re #7

    We are not talking about the site for sharing copyrighted content. Wake up and RTFA. Also, you do understand what open source is right? You do understand that some people want their stuff out there for promotion right? There are just as many legitimate uses for File Sharing site of any magnitude as there are "illegal". So quit trying to make TorrentSpy out to be some big bad place. The most the MPAA should have ever gone through was sending DMCA for material they KNEW (after a thorough checkout) they had the rights to. TorrentSpy was technically protected by section 230. But you are probably one of those people who would like to think that doesn't exist. I will summarize. If a user posts something on your site, you are not responsible for it.
    You are only responsible for you, unless you are promoting all of the illegal stuff in a very serious manner (inducing).

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