Boston Police Still Calling Random Light-Up Devices 'Hoax' Bombs

from the it's-not-a-hoax dept

Earlier this year, a Cartoon Network marketing promotion became a huge story in the city of Boston when police assumed that some promotional light-up boxes were actually bombs. Rather than admit that they made a mistake and overreacted, the authorities in Boston continued to accuse the folks behind the promotion of perpetrating a "hoax" on the city. Of course, a hoax is where you try and trick people. None of the folks involved in the promotion were trying to trick anyone into believing the promotional devices were bombs. They were simply promotional. However, Boston still seems to be focused on calling any electronics device they don't understand a hoax device. The latest situation involves an MIT student wearing a sweatshirt that included a homemade electrical component that would light up LEDs on the sweatshirt. It's certainly understandable that security would want to check out the device and understand it. It's even somewhat understandable that they would be quite concerned about a homemade electrical device found in a sweatshirt. Walking into an airport with such a device is asking for trouble. However, to then accuse her of possessing a "hoax device," seems a bit absurd. This wasn't a "hoax" device at all. She wasn't trying to trick anyone.

Filed Under: boston, hoax, mooninite


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  1. identicon
    Overcast, 23 Sep 2007 @ 3:41pm

    Being an MIT electrical engineering student means two things:
    1. She probably isn't stupid.
    2. She probably isn't used to dealing with stupid people either.


    Seriously... how can you say taking something that any normal person could at least guess - *might* be seen as a IED by someone else into an airport a good idea? Regardless, if upon 2 seconds of observation it could have been ruled out as an IED, the fact remains - she did a series of stupid things..

    College Student != automatically = intelligent, that's for certain.

    Actually an intelligent person would have known it was a good idea, to first talk to security about it, prior to even going to the airport. A simple phone call, and then a stop by the security office would have done wonders.

    That or maybe - what an INTELLIGENT person would have done, it talk with security and put it in a bag and check the luggage in.

    Or perhaps an intelligent person would have sent the item to their destination first via FedEX or UPS.

    An intelligent person might have checked the TSA's web page to determine if there would be any cause for concern when wearing a bread board and holding silly putty. Google would have been helpful.

    An intelligent person might have waited, answered all of security's questions, and made sure there were no further concerns before attempting to go further into the terminal.

    Intelligent people don't go into airports with 'silly' putty and other electronics that might give the impression it's a 'concern'. An Intelligent person would have *known* that ahead of time and not made any assumptions.

    The fact that she did not think of any of this ahead of time, either makes her quite stupid or in dire need of attention.

    http://www.boston.com/news/globe/city_region/breaking_news/2007/09/mit_student_arr.htm l

    According to what I read there, she walked away without saying a word about it.

    That's quite stupid, indeed.

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