Judge Rules That Novell, Not SCO, Owns Unix Copyrights

from the whoops dept

For years, ever since SCO first sued IBM for infringement found in Linux, SCO has had trouble proving any of its claims. SCO was still quite cocky about the idea that once the case (and the various associated cases) got to court, it would show that SCO had a smoking gun all along. However, even judges involved in the case are skeptical and point out the lack of evidence to support SCO's position. One offshoot case, you may recall, was that soon after the original SCO-IBM case was filed, Novell came out and announced that it still owned the copyrights on Unix, and SCO was incorrect in claiming the rights had been transferred. In fact, Novell pointed out that behind the scenes SCO had been quietly begging Novell to transfer the copyright to them. However, SCO continued its brash legal fight against reality and sued Novell. Late Friday the ruling came down, and once again, SCO was on the losing side. The judge found that Novell still owns the copyrights to Unix, meaning that the meat of SCO's case against IBM may have just disappeared. In retrospect, it's fairly amazing the lengths that SCO and its supporters have gone in trying to tar everyone who questioned their position. Don't expect an apology, though.

Filed Under: linux, unix
Companies: ibm, novell, sco


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  1. identicon
    Anonymous Coward, 13 Aug 2007 @ 5:12am

    Damn would people quit repeating such nonsense.

    The judge ruled that Novel did not transfer the copyrights to Unix to Santa Cruze Operations and as such Santa Cruze Operations did not transfer the copyrights to Caldaria who did not transfer them to The SCO Group.

    If one recalls the BSDi case the judge ruled that AT&T did not own the copyrights and that the owners were the Universities and businesses who wrote the code with the biggest code writer being University of California. Thus for AT&T to continue AT&T had to license that portion of the code from the University of California. Other license agreements with the likes of Silicon Graphics, HP, and IBM were also interred into. These universities and companies still own their code and the judge did NOT rule otherwise.

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