RIAA Tries To Stop Trent Reznor's Promotional Campaign For New Concept Album

from the whoops dept

In the comments to an earlier post today, a reader pointed us to an article about Trent Reznor's promotional campaign for his latest Nine Inch Nails album. It sounds like he's taken a page from the various alternate reality games that have been popular in promoting movies and video games over the past few years. That is, there appears to be a series of secretive websites that are being leaked out with various clues and there's a big group of fans all trying to track down the details. Also, at some Nine Inch Nails concerts, people have found USB keys in the bathroom with songs from the upcoming album. Not surprisingly, those songs quickly found their way online, all with Reznor's approval. Of course, no one seems to have told the RIAA about this marketing campaign. The RIAA went and demanded that various sites pull down the songs, even though Reznor wanted the songs to spread for promotional purposes. The RIAA always says that if artists want to promote their own songs by giving them away for free they have no problem with it -- but it seems that their mindset is so focused on the idea that no one would ever want to do this that they still have to issue takedowns when artists want the songs given away.
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  1. identicon
    josh, 2 Apr 2007 @ 6:03pm

    As a musician myself, i have always felt that it would be in my best interest to freely share my music with as many people as i could. Even if at some point in the future, i came to desire monetary rewards for my compositions, in the beginning at least, it seems that a widespread free sharing of my music would be a good idea to gain exposure. Thus creating a bigger base of consuming fans.

    For art's sake of course, it should be an artists hope that his or her music reaches as many people as possible, as easily as possible. Free is easier.

    Either way, whether you want to make money from your music or not, freely sharing it in the beginning (or when promoting a new album in this case) is a good idea. Of course, the choice to share YOUR OWN music is completely YOUR OWN choice.

    This is the last step the RIAA will take before it violently tumbles down the haphazardly assembled staircase it has built in an effort to steal art away from the world...

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