Company Gets Patent On Digital Downloads; Sues Everyone

from the great dept

There's been quite a trend lately of companies who had otherwise completely failed in the marketplace to suddenly reinvent themselves as "patent licensing firms" and then go and sue everyone who actually was able to successfully innovate in the market. The latest entrant is Intertainer, a company that was fairly well known for a few bubble years, but was unable to find a real market for their online video distribution system. They blamed the movie industry for colluding against them (a lawsuit on that issue never went very far, nor did the antitrust investigation it helped trigger), but are taking it out on the tech industry. The company, which has long since been out of business, is back from the dead suing Google, Apple and Napster, claiming they all violate a patent the company holds on digital downloads. Go ahead and read through the patent and help us all understand what is new or non-obvious in the patent. The patent was filed (provisionally) in March of 2001, by which point it's hard to believe that the idea of distributing content electronically wasn't well known. I worked for a company in 1998 and 1999 that did many of the things described in the patent, and we were far from cutting edge at the time. The best comment in the article, though, goes to Eric Goldman, an expert in high tech law, who notes: "I have the same problem with this patent as so many of the patents of the dot-com boom days: I don't know what it means." Intertainer missed the market. It happens. It's a part of business. It would be nice if they could now leave those who succeeded alone to continue innovating, rather than wasting everyone's time and money on a pointless lawsuit over a silly patent.

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  1. identicon
    Yo ho ho..., 3 Jan 2007 @ 10:57am

    Re: Do you know what you are talking about?

    This response is also for Ben!

    Give it up! I have also filed (and been awarded 2 patents) while working for a start-up, and as much as I believe that it is inherently the only system to protect David from Goliath, I am totally disgusted by your defense of this piece of crap being pushed as legitimate IP.

    First, it was not even awarded -- but filed as a provisional. And there is no evidence that the provisional was supported by a legitimate application within the 12 month window. Second, it is a bunch of obvious, non-descript BS with no technical merit. This is more of a process filing, which deserves even higher scrutiny than technical awards.

    I am not pleased with the patent system today -- as what is really lacking is true consistent and competent panel reviews for awards... but this crapola is the type of garbage in the system that really hurts everybody!

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