Washington Post Just Discovers That Web Reporters And Paper Reporters Can Work Together?

from the uh,-seriously? dept

Nearly a year and a half ago, we were surprised to find out that the NY Times still kept its newspaper reporters and its online reporters separate -- and had finally agreed to merge the two operations. It only seemed newsworthy in the fact that it was so far behind the times. Apparently, though, when it comes to journalistic endeavors, they were on the cutting edge. Today comes the news that the Washington Post has finally decided to do the same thing and merge its online operations with its paper operations. What's even more surprising about this is that the Washington Post was actually one of the earliest newspapers to go online. They had a great online presence called "Newsbytes" that had a strong following, but disappeared literally overnight, breaking a ton of incoming links, when some higher ups at the paper wanted everything to go behind a registration wall. The Washington Post has continued to experiment with different online formats -- but the fact that they would just now think of combining news rooms suggests just how out of touch they are with how the news actually works these days. Update: Robert MacMillan, the author of the original piece (and a former Newsbytes and Washington Post reporter) stops by to let us know this is even less than it appears to be. They're still keeping the two divisions separate, but are simply blurring some of the boundaries between them -- though, the specific plans are still in the air.

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  1. identicon
    Anonymous Coward, 3 Jan 2007 @ 6:28am

    Re: the new demographics

    There's no such thing as an "online" audience? I beg to differ. There are still plenty of people without access to the Internet, or who don't know how to use it (read: poor, elderly, and/or incompetent). I was visiting relatives recently and despite being well-off, they would never read their news on the Internet. They still have dial-up, have no basic concept of how to use a computer, and instead get the newspaper every day. Guess what? They're still surviving.

    My guess is the "online" audience tends to be younger, more well-off, and of course, somewhat Internet savvy.

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