When State-Owned Telco Is Losing Money, Play The National Security Card

from the so-that's-how-it-works dept

We've seen plenty of stories over the years where governments who have state-owned telcos put in place various policies to protect the revenue from those sources at the expense of their citizens. Lately that's taken the form of blocking VoIP offerings. In Zimbabwe, the government has allowed competition in the mobile phone market, while still owning a mobile carrier itself -- but it required all mobile operators to make use of the state-owned international gateway. A Zimbabwe court struck down that rule, allowing the mobile operators to use independent gateways. Of course, rather than complaining about how this will cause more problems for the state-owned (and, of course, money-losing) operator, Zimbabwe is now claiming that using independent gateways is a threat to national security. This fits with a recently proposed law that would allow the government to listen in on calls. Combine all of this and it sounds a lot less like a national security issue, and one where the government wants to be able to spy on its people and protect the monopoly of the state-owned operator who apparently can't compete with the privately owned competitors.

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  • identicon
    Stu, 28 Nov 2006 @ 11:21am

    Hey, it's Zimbabwe - what do you expect?

    reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

  • identicon
    Sanguine Dream, 28 Nov 2006 @ 11:22am

    You really shouldn't have

    posted this in place that American politians may read it. I can see someone pushing for this in 2008 presidential race because, "Someone has to think of the children." And if people start to oppose it then they will play the, "If you don't support this then you support terrorism" card.

    reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

  • identicon
    Kev, 28 Nov 2006 @ 11:56am

    I'm glad we would never allow spying on our phones here in America.... wait...

    reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

  • identicon
    Paul, 28 Nov 2006 @ 12:20pm

    I declare

    That anyone who hates the Coreys also hates America!

    reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

  • identicon
    ScaredOfTheMan, 28 Nov 2006 @ 1:11pm

    National Secutiry is a BS argument in this case

    If the government (Zimbawa or other) wants to listen and record your phone calls it can easily do it right before each operators international gateways.

    This is a money grab pure and simple. I bet the government owned gateway's rates are 3 X that of the carriers.

    reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

  • identicon
    |333173|3|_||3, 28 Nov 2006 @ 7:00pm

    That is the case in Aus with regard to DSLAM access, the better ISPs have beeen building thier own ADSL2+ DSLAMS for years, Telstra have only just begun, and only in exchanges where competitors have ADSL2+. Everywhere els is stuck on 1.5 Mbps TElstra connectuions, or Cable Whirlpool has more detail about his.

    reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]


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