New York Times Tells Brits They Can't Read Article On UK Terror Case

from the jurisdictional-silliness dept

Questions of legal jurisdiction over online content are nothing new at all. Over the years, we've pointed to plenty of legal cases that raised issues about online publications, and whether the content was liable under local laws in countries outside of where the publisher (or its servers) were based. Unfortunately, there still isn't a general agreement on what laws apply, and that makes things risky. Apparently, the NY Times didn't want to risk any such lawsuit in the UK, so when it published an article yesterday about the British terror case, it used some of its geographic ad targeting technology to also block out visitors from the UK from reading the content. This is to stay on the right side of British laws that "prohibits publication of prejudicial information about the defendants prior to trial." Of course, the Times then went on to publish an article proudly stating how they blocked the content from UK readers, which makes you wonder how effective the ban really is. By calling attention to it, it seems pretty likely that plenty of folks in the UK will be able to read the same (or similar) content from plenty of other sources. This isn't to call out the Times for the practice, but to question whether such laws are actually still possible in a world with a global internet.

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  1. identicon
    Ian Eiloart, 29 Aug 2006 @ 9:26am

    Re: Re: red flag - white flag

    "The directive has been issued to ensure that the terrorists on trial... are sucessfully convicted"

    No, there's no directive. There's a law, and there's a decision by the NYT. The law exists to ensure fair trial. I don't know whether the NYT decided to respect the law so that the accused can get a fair trial, or whether they did it to help convict.

    Either way, if there's extensive media coverage asserting the guilt of the accused, then that's grounds for dismissing the trial.

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