Gambling Is Bad (Unless It's A State Sponsored Lotto Or Involves Horses)

from the then-it's-fine? dept

As expected, our elected Congress folks have moved forward with their plans to "clarify" gambling laws, which will effectively outlaw playing online poker, even allowing the government to push ISPs to block access to gambling sites. Of course, if the similar law in Washington State is anything to go by, expect all sorts of perfectly legitimate sites to be forced offline. Once again, it seems unfair to put the burden here on ISPs to block these sites. If the gambling sites share servers with other perfectly legitimate sites, those will be taken offline as well. It's worth noting, of course, that the law carves out exceptions for state lotteries (gambling is good when the money goes the government, apparently) and horse racing... because... well, there's really no good reason for it, but apparently some Congress folks like to bet on the ponies. It's unlikely the bill will go anywhere as the Senate apparently doesn't care much about this issue, but it's yet another example of Congress gearing up for election season by tackling the "really important problems" facing our nation.

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  1. identicon
    Raekwon, 12 Jul 2006 @ 1:43pm

    More?

    I'll post some more info before the flames start.


    “In an accurate translation of the Jewish Scriptures, the word "Moshiach" is never translated as "Messiah," but as "anointed."1Nevertheless, Judaism has always maintained a fundamental belief in a Messianic figure. Since the concept of a Messiah is one that was given by G-d to the Jews, Jewish tradition is best qualified to describe and recognize the expected Messiah. Judaism understands the Messiah to be a human being (with no connotation of deity or divinity) who will bring about certain changes in the world and who must fulfill certain specific criteria before being acknowledged as the Messiah.”
    “These specific criteria are as follows:
    1) He must be Jewish. (Deuteronomy 17:15, Numbers 24:17)
    2) He must be a member of the tribe of Judah (Genesis 49:10) and a direct male descendent of both King David (I Chronicles 17:11, Psalm 89:29-38, Jeremiah 33:17, II Samuel 7:12-16) and King Solomon. (I Chronicles 22:10, II Chronicles 7:18)
    3) He must gather the Jewish people from exile and return them to Israel. (Isaiah 27:12-13, Isaiah 11:12)
    4) He must rebuild the Jewish Temple in Jerusalem. (Micah 4:1)
    5) He must bring world peace. (Isaiah 2:4, Isaiah 11:6, Micah 4:3)
    6) He must influence the entire world to acknowledge and serve one G-d. (Isaiah 11:9, Isaiah 40:5, Zephaniah 3:9)
    If an individual fails to fulfill even one of these conditions, he cannot be the Messiah.”
    “A careful analysis of these criteria shows us that, although Jesus was Jewish, he did not fulfill any of the other criteria. An examination of the contradictory accounts of Jesus' genealogy demonstrates a number of difficulties with the fulfillment of the second criterion. Specifically, the New Testament claims that Jesus did not have a physical father. The Jewish Scriptures, however, clearly state that a person's genealogy and tribal membership is transmitted exclusively through one's physical father (Numbers 1:18, Jeremiah 33:17). Therefore, Jesus cannot possibly be a descendent of the tribe of Judah nor of King David and King Solomon.
    There are even further problems with any attempts to use the Jewish Scriptures to prove Jesus' genealogy through Joseph, the husband of Mary (Jesus' mother). For the New Testament claims that Joseph was a descendent of King Jeconiah, who in the Hebrew Bible was cursed to never have a descendent "sitting on the throne of David and ruling any more in Judah" (Jeremiah 22:30). Joseph's genealogy, even if it were transmittable to Jesus, would only serve to further disqualify Jesus as the Messiah.
    Finally, there is the problem of the contradictory accounts of Jesus' genealogy in Matthew, Chapter 1 and Luke, Chapter 3. The common Christian explanation of this contradiction claims that Luke's genealogy is that of Jesus' mother, Mary. However, this is unfounded, even according to the Greek original. In addition, it has already been established that genealogy is transferred solely through the father, making this attempted explanation completely irrelevant. Even if one could trace one's genealogy through one's mother, there would be the additional problem that Luke 3:31 lists Mary as a descendent of David through Nathan, Solomon's brother, and not through Solomon himself as required according to the prophesy in I Chronicles 22:10 of the Jewish Bible.
    The third, fourth, fifth and sixth criteria have obviously not been fulfilled -- neither during Jesus' time nor since. Any Christian claims that these final criteria will be fulfilled in a "Second Coming" are irrelevant because the concept of the Messiah coming twice has no scriptural basis.
    To summarize, we cannot know that someone is the Messiah until he fulfills all of the above criteria.
    The Christian understanding of the Messiah and Jesus differs greatly from the Jewish biblical view. These differences developed as a result of the Church's influence during the time of the Emperor Constantine and the Council of Nicaea that issued the Nicene Creed in 325 CE.”

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