Anti-Spyware And Anti-Virus Programs Get All Tangled Up

from the this-is-going-to-be-messy dept

We've already talked about how many people need many different kinds of security applications on their computers -- but it looks like those applications may start to conflict.  Historically, anti-spyware apps have stayed out of the way of anti-virus apps, knowing that anti-virus apps are the granddaddy of Windows security apps and had some "right of way" on more sophisticated scanning techniques.  However, with the anti-virus companies getting into the anti-spyware game, some of the anti-spyware firms feel they need to use more active scanning techniques, which could conflict with anti-virus apps doing similar scans -- causing machines to completely lockup.  Obviously, that's not a particularly good situation for anyone.  Does this mean we're also going to have to install a special "traffic cop" on our computers to make sure the various anti-something software products don't conflict and break our computers?
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  • identicon
    Anonymous Coward, 14 Dec 2005 @ 10:31pm

    No Subject Given

    When you purchase a pc from Dell that comes pre-installed with Symantec/Norton Anti-Virus package, and a pre-installed link to AOL on the desktop with an option to sign-up for AOL online services... as soon as the 60MB download is complete and begins installing, It insists on also installing McAfee Anti-Virus software -- even if you already have an Anti-Virus software installed on your system.

    It does not ask if you want to uninstall or disable the prior AV software, AOL just installs McAfee as part of it's built-in "Safety and Security Services".

    By clicking on this certain "Dell recommended ISP" and installing AOL's McAfee ontop of Dell's pre-installed version of Norton, you will find your computer no longer to function properly. The system will lock up at windows boot sequence.

    nice.

    reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

    • identicon
      Andrew Strasser, 14 Dec 2005 @ 10:34pm

      Re: No Subject Given

      people just need to learn to play nice together... doubtful but hopeful....

      reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

    • identicon
      Foamy The Squirrel, 15 Dec 2005 @ 2:21am

      Re: No Subject Given

      That is why I build my own. No muss, no fuss, and I can install what I want and have none of the bilge that comes pre-installed on corporate machines.

      reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

      • identicon
        GSA, 15 Dec 2005 @ 11:49am

        Re: No Subject Given

        Generally, it's not the corporate class systems that are populated with bilge. IBM and HP, at least, know that corp IT departments will not stay with them if they preload crap that has to be removed before deployment.

        It's the CONSUMER pc's that are the problem, and yes, home-brewing your own with an OEM licensed copy of WinXP Pro from Newegg et.al. is the solution if you want Windows.

        reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

    • identicon
      Ed H., 15 Dec 2005 @ 8:34am

      Re: No Subject Given

      Just last night I allowed my HP notebook to run some kind of monthly recommended checkup. This attempted to run some javascript spyware checker which Norton Anti-virus (bundled with the notebook by HP) caught and stopped. Not quite as bad as making the computer unusable, but it doesn't inspire a lot of confidence that HP's tools are worth anything.

      On top of that, the Norton AV has expired, so now all it does is threaten me with dire warnings about how my PC is unprotected against spreading threats. My ISP supplies McAfee for free, so I'd like to switch over to that, but I know that's going to be a pain.

      To the dismay of many, the real solution to this will come when Microsoft takes over both the anti-spyware and anti-virus markets.

      reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

    • identicon
      JB, 15 Dec 2005 @ 10:26am

      Re: No Subject Given

      I just bought a laptop from Dell and the first thing I did is what I always do with these OEM software bundled pc's - format it. Get rid of the bullshit system partitions and diagnostic partitions that waste space - kill the bullshit software they try to force you to use and install what works for you. Now I have a PC that is set up right with the software and options i want and it runs much better than it did right out the box.

      reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

  • identicon
    Landon, 14 Dec 2005 @ 11:15pm

    No Subject Given

    I take on the nudist philosophy. It feels so much nicer without all the extra stuff. We dont need any of it anyways.

    reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

  • identicon
    JDS, 14 Dec 2005 @ 11:47pm

    No Subject Given

    yep....good ole companies doing it again. I prefer to just use free programs like Spybot...AVG Free...Lavasoft Personal Ed...etc. And then checking up with Hijackthis...I am able to keep my systems quite clean...(although I admit it can take a while to be certain I am clean).

    reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

  • identicon
    lar3ry, 15 Dec 2005 @ 8:21am

    A good traffic cop

    WinPooch is a free and pretty good "traffic cop" that doesn't actually scan for known viruses or spyware, but rather watches out for spyware-like and virus-like activities. It also works with Clam Antivirus, which can scan for known threats. All nice, and all free software.

    I find this setup to be more proactive. I mean, if I download a text editor and WinPooch alerts me that it's listening on some strange port for internet activity, and this behavior is not documented anywhere, it's a good cause for concern!

    In addition, if you are relying on Anti-Spyware utilities, remember there are some spyware companies out there that sue or threaten some anti-spyware utilities that put their programs on the "Spyware" list, saying that they are not spyware, but "adware" (as if that were better). The companies that cave in to such tactics end up with "utilites" that lack the utility that they are supposed to be providing!

    — lar3ry

    reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

    • identicon
      The White Wolfe, 15 Dec 2005 @ 8:26am

      Re: A good traffic cop

      Build my own too. Use AVG Free, Ad-Aware SE Personal and AnalogX Script Defender.

      Stays clean with no problems.

      reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

  • identicon
    Bernie, 15 Dec 2005 @ 8:27am

    Spyware vs Antivirus

    It's confusing for sure! My computers have Microsoft's Anti-Spyware beta, Ad-Aware SE Pro,System Mechanic 4 Pro with popup stopper, plus Panda Antivirus Platinum with popup stoppers, anti-spyware etc. etc. I haven't taken anything out yet because I don't understand if they all do the same job the same way. So far everything loads and runs without collisions. That I find amazing.

    reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

    • identicon
      FireMonkey, 15 Dec 2005 @ 9:42am

      Re: Spyware vs Antivirus

      Here's a good popup stopper for ya: a firewall router.

      Many moons ago, I picked up a simple Linksys router and said goodbye to popups. Haven't seen one on any of my home machines for years...

      reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

  • identicon
    Minus, 15 Dec 2005 @ 8:31am

    No Subject Given

    Funny, i've always tried to maintain 30 or less processes running at all times. I don't have an A/V, nor Spyware removal. I use Firefox and a firewall. And once a month when i run the antivirus (which i install and immediately remove), and spyware removal, i come up 100 % clean. Except some registry keys which don't do anything special. I know which sites to visit, and which ones to stay away from, and like this my PC is optimal 10 out of 10 times.

    reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

  • identicon
    Devon, 15 Dec 2005 @ 8:40am

    No Subject Given

    Although we deploy Symantec to our clients, I've been running McAffee's integrated solution at home and I love it. I know it's not the best on the market, but it does seem to run smoothly without impacting system performance.

    reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

  • identicon
    Robert H. Welch, 15 Dec 2005 @ 9:59am

    Electronic Mafia thrives

    Paying protection money to the modern day Mafia is now the norm. The gangsters of yesteryear are now called CEO's. Go figure!

    reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

  • identicon
    ToeKnee, 15 Dec 2005 @ 10:05am

    unbelievable

    I find it hard to believe so many people put up with this crap. I do consulting and fix a lot of virus/spyware infestations. It's good income. There are many of us who do this type of freelance work, and most I know do not use Windows at home. Mac and Linux are such better alternatives, especially Mac OS X. Everyone that I've helped switch has thanked me for the advice to do that. So, yes, I profit from their misery, but I also present them the alternative... T

    reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

    • identicon
      Anonymous Coward, 15 Dec 2005 @ 10:13am

      Re: unbelievable

      ToeKnee, since you advocate Mac & Linux... will you come to my office and re-train the 500+ employees to use these systems you mention? Will you also re-purchase (with your own money) all the software and licenses required to run them?

      Thank you.

      reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

  • identicon
    Bunk, 12 Mar 2006 @ 6:29am

    AOL 9.0 vs Norton Security System

    MY wife uses AOL 9.0 plus all the security bells and whistles it contains. She also uses Norton Security System. The combination results in a deadly slow computer. It takes 20 seconds for the program menu to pop up after clicking Start. Need I mention that her HP Pavilion a300n has a 2.6 Ghz processor and 256 MB ram? I get the feeling these overlapping security systems get intertwangled and begin thinking THEY are the reason her computer exists.. to keep THEM alive.. to give them purpose.

    reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

  • identicon
    Tracey, 13 May 2006 @ 5:27am

    Aols Mcafee clashing with my zone alarm

    Everytime my desk top loads up I get a message saying some of Mcafees files are missing or corrupt,I am using Aol 9.0 and got Zone Alarm Internet Security and when I run a virus scan I get messgae from Mcafee saying they found a suspisious file on my PC but Zone Alarm is running the scan.I used to have Mcafee internet sercurity and uninstalled it.

    reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

  • identicon
    KNOW S THIS, 19 May 2006 @ 5:57am

    NORTONS ANTI VIRUS AND 9.0 SECURITY EDITONS DOES CAUSE PC PROBLEMS WHAT PROGRAMS CAN I USE WITH NO SECU RITY OR SPYWARE??/

    reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

  • identicon
    Craig, 22 Dec 2009 @ 7:36am

    I just think it's funny that people actually need both programs. As if creating a program that does both at once is just some sort of technological holy grail. The real issue is, why doesn't MS just handle all these antivirus and spyware/adware issues in the OS code?

    reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]


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