How Paris Hilton Got Hacked? Bad Password Protection

from the tinkerbell dept

This morning, in Good Morning Silicon Valley, John Paczkowski joked (I think) that he'd bet "$5 and a Swarovski-encrusted dunce cap says her password was Tinkerbell." He might be right. While T-Mobile still says they're trying to figure out how Paris Hilton's T-Mobile account got hacked, Brian McWilliams has it all figured out. Her password might not have been Tinkerbell (the well known name of her dog), but the secret question to get her password reset was: "What is your favorite pet's name?" Yup. It wasn't necessarily social engineering or a security hole or even real hacking (though, in some sense, it was a combination of all three). It was good, old fashioned, stupidity -- leaving the keys under the front door matt with a big sign that says "keys under the matt" next to it.

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  1. identicon
    Nick, 25 Feb 2005 @ 8:19am

    T-Mobile Password Hacking

    ... another likely theory was given in this post over at Kevin Rose's site.
    The hack is a simple one that I duplicated easily. If you have Sprint or T-Mobile and have auto voicemail login enabled, you are vulnerable to this type of attack. I have auto voicemail login enabled because I hate entering my voicemail PIN number each time I want to check my messages. The voicemail authentication system is simple. It uses caller ID to validate the originating number if the caller ID matches your cell phone number (ie. your cell phone calling in to check your voicemail messages), it will log you in automatically. This system has worked great for the last few years. Well, that is until the advent of commercial caller ID spoofing systems such as CovertCall and Telespoof. For those not in-the-know, caller ID spoofing allows you to change your caller ID number to anything you like. To hack myself, I simply logged into CovertCall and placed a spoofed call to my cell phone. The spoofed call was to my cell phone, from my cell phone, forwarded to a pay phone. Sprint (my provider) thought I was calling from my cell, and automatically logged me in (even though I was performing this from a pay phone down the street).

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