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Computers

by Mike Masnick




Will You Bring Your Own PC To Work?

from the changing-times dept

People often have emotional attachments with their computers, even if that computer is supplied by their employers. Going one step beyond the concept of telecommuting and the so-called commoditization of IT, some are wondering if a few years from now, people will be expected to bring their own computers to work, the same way they're expected to drive their own cars to work. And, if that's the case, what will it mean for the traditional role of the IT staffer who used to have to get you set up with your computer and help you troubleshoot when things weren't working properly? The article suggests it may mean fewer IT jobs, since they won't have to manager purchasing new machines and applications. However, it could mean a shift of those jobs towards the new problem: making all of those different PC configurations work together properly. Of course, that seems like an opportunity as well. If things really do progress in this manner, there will be a greater need for automation tools that can help configure a machine to work within a specific corporate network environment.

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  1. identicon
    eeyore, 10 May 2004 @ 9:15am

    Re: exactly the problem

    simple. you can require whatever the hell you want to, and the department manager comes in and does whatever the hell he (or she) wants to because they're management and you're a serf. The manager in question wasn't reprimanded even after it was proven that the virus came from his system, but the IT manager was reprimanded for "not properly securing the network."

    It's hard enough securing managed assets, but when you have systems where users have full administrative access it's impossible to adequately safeguard them because all they care about is "ease of use," not "security of corporate infrastructure." And that attitude goes all the way to the top.

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