Chili Peppers And Metallica Resist A La Carte Downloading

from the all-or-nothing-for-the-fans dept

Metallica certainly doesn't have the reputation for being particularly fan friendly when it comes to the internet, so it's no surprise that they've made the decision not to let music download services like iTunes offer up their songs on an individual basis. Now, however, many other bands are protesting this a la carte distribution of their music. A number of other well-known musical groups, such as Linkin Park, Red Hot Chili Peppers, Green Day and Kid Rock have all joined Metallica in telling Apple they won't be included in iTunes if they have to allow for single song downloads. The artists, as they're known to do, say that this is all for "artistic" reasons rather than financial reasons. They're certainly allowed to do whatever they want, but they'll soon find that upsetting their fans isn't the smartest move in the world. If the music is good, fans will download the full album. If it's not, then why should they force them to. While some think that iTunes' unbundling of music will harm the industry, that's a very shortsighted view. By letting musicians create and distribute music quickly and cheaply, while also giving fans more of what they want, it will let musicians produce more music and grow even larger fan bases. Denying your fans what they want doesn't exactly make you look fan-friendly - and with so many choices today for where people will spend their money, not being fan-friendly can hurt... in the financial sense. Besides, if fans can't use legitimate services to download the few songs they want from these artists, they'll simply go to file sharing networks and download them for free.
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  1. icon
    Mike (profile), 3 Jul 2003 @ 1:03am

    Re: No Subject Given

    As I said, they absolutely have the right to do what they want. I'm not sneering at that. I am, however, suggesting that the end results will be the opposite of what you say. By not offering individual song downloads they're doing more to threaten their big checks.

    Customers want individual song downloads. Not offering that is going against your customer's wants, and makes it much less likely you'll attract new fans. The industry is shifting. People who try to "hang onto" their old business model will find that it has shifted out from under them.

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