European Court To Explore If Linking To Infringing Material Is Infringing

from the again dept

A couple of years ago in the Svensson case, the European Court of Justice (CJEU) made it clear (finally) that merely linking to content is not infringement. That was a case involving a news aggregator linking to official sources. However, in a new case that has been referred to the CJEU, the court will examine if links to unauthorized versions of content is infringing as well. The excellent IPKat has the details of the case which involves a blog that linked to some pre-publication Playboy photos in the Netherlands. A lower court had said that it wasn’t copyright infringement, but still broke the law, by facilitating access. On appeal, the court found that the free speech concerns outweighed the copyright concerns. From the description by the lawyer representing the blogger (“Geen Stijl news”):

We lodged an appeal on behalf of Geen Stijl on a few grounds which was successful: the Court of Appeal had misapplied the ‘quotation’ exception in copyright law and did not sufficiently balance the freedom of speech versus copyright protection, as it indicated that ‘only in exceptional circumstances’ would the freedom of speech outweigh copyright protection, as freedom of speech concerns are taken into account in the law, in particular in the exceptions. The Supreme Court followed our reasoning that copyright is a fundamental right, but that the same goes for the freedom of speech, and that they thus should be considered on equal footing. The Court of Appeal should therefore have considered all relevant circumstances (among which is whether this is commercial speech or a news item) and not only exceptional circumstances. Never before has the freedom of speech been given so much weight in The Netherlands.

That’s the good news. On the flip side, Sanoma, the Dutch publisher of Playboy, has appealed on its own, and that’s the question that is going to the CJEU. It basically asks how to apply that earlier ruling saying linking is not infringing to a case in which the content being linked to is not authorized — and whether it matters if the linker knew or should have known the content was infringing.

Given the scenario, this could become a rather important copyright case in Europe, considering how frequently people may end up linking to content that may be infringing.

Filed Under: , , , , , , , , , ,
Companies: geen stijl, playboy, sanoma

Rate this comment as insightful
Rate this comment as funny
You have rated this comment as insightful
You have rated this comment as funny
Flag this comment as abusive/trolling/spam
You have flagged this comment
The first word has already been claimed
The last word has already been claimed
Insightful Lightbulb icon Funny Laughing icon Abusive/trolling/spam Flag icon Insightful badge Lightbulb icon Funny badge Laughing icon Comments icon

Comments on “European Court To Explore If Linking To Infringing Material Is Infringing”

Subscribe: RSS Leave a comment
18 Comments
PaulT (profile) says:

Re: Re:

Yeah, that was going to be my point. Content can be changed at any point. Links are fixed, not dynamic, and the link target address often does not describe the content (e.g. YouTube videos are random letters, not a title). If I link to something that’s authorised, then the content on that link changes later, I should not be liable for anything related to that content. I cannot possibly know what a link will do after I post it.

That fact alone – that I can be retroactively committing some crime without my knowledge – should be enough to throw this out. Doubly so since, by definition, linked content is almost certainly not under my control. There are other concerns, but this should be enough to reject such an idea off hand.

Once again, go after the people actually committing infringement, not the most convenient third party.

Anonymous Coward says:

If it becomes law that a link to infringement is in itself infringement or illegal to do so then it would be no surprise if people stop showing links posted on their websites to other websites out of fear that they will be deemed a criminal and sued for facilitating copyright infringement as they will not know if what they are linking to is infringement or not and to be safe will not host any links on their website just in case.

Anonymous Coward says:

Re: Re: Re:

They will be happy for every website to be removed from the internet so that they can then use the whole entire internet as one gigantic tv viewing service with them in total control of what gets viewed by people and when and you can sure bet that they will try and introduce some feature to make recording of the media that they play illegal. I hope it never comes to pass.

Add Your Comment

Your email address will not be published.

Have a Techdirt Account? Sign in now. Want one? Register here

Comment Options:

Make this the or (get credits or sign in to see balance) what's this?

What's this?

Techdirt community members with Techdirt Credits can spotlight a comment as either the "First Word" or "Last Word" on a particular comment thread. Credits can be purchased at the Techdirt Insider Shop »