Officer Bubbles Sues To Find Out Identity Of Anonymous YouTubers

from the double-bubble-toil-and-trouble dept

Back at the G20 meetings in July in Toronto, there were numerous stories of police overreacting and arresting protesters with little reason whatsoever. Perhaps the most noteworthy story that got attention was the story of “Officer Bubbles,” the name given to a police officer, named Adam Josephs, who threatened to arrest a woman for assault if the bubbles she was blowing landed on him. You can see the video here:

Officer Bubbles became a bit of an internet phenomenon, and others built on it, as normally happens in internet memes. Apparently, one person made cartoon versions of Officer Bubble arresting various famous people, such as President Obama and Santa Claus. Because of that, Officer Adam Josephs has now filed a $1.2 million defamation lawsuit. The press reports were a bit unclear, with some saying he was actually suing YouTube, and others saying he was just asking YouTube to hand over the names. However, Howard Knopf links to what certainly appears to be the legal filing in question, and Josephs is suing YouTube and claiming that it’s responsible for publishing the videos and comments:
While Canada (for whatever reason) does not have a Section 230-type safe harbor, protecting service providers from liability of actions of their users, this still seems misguided. It’s pretty ridiculous to claim that YouTube is somehow responsible for these videos or comments. However, as you can see in the filing above, in every instance, Officer Josephs appears to accuse YouTube of “publishing or republishing” the works, thus making it liable. One would hope that Google would fight strongly over such ridiculous claims.

As you read through the lawsuit, some of the YouTube comments Josephs is suing over are pretty silly, and it’s difficult to see how they’re worth a lawsuit. I mean, here’s one of the comments:

“true — probably wears the sunglasses while looking at himself in the mirror!!!”

Now, that may be a false statement (though, can he really say he never looked at himself in the mirror with sunglasses?), but does it really qualify to the level of defamatory? Similarly, another of the comments he’s suing over reads:

“officer bubbles probably looks at himself in the mirror a lot.”

Again, is that really defamatory?

Other comments certainly appear to be mostly opinion, rather than any sort of statement of fact:

“It’s a shame that the police are becoming uniformed bullies. It’s bad when the local people tell them to leave their community.”

and

“Nice going Officer Josephs, you are a real hero and a true testament to the sorry state of law enforcemtn here in Canada, and a fine example of the kind of policing peaceful people had to endure during the G20 farce.”

Even in cases where the comments were a bit more stringent, it’s hard to see how they could be seen as anything more than angry venting. The Toronto Star spoke to one of the (still anonymous) commenters who said he doesn’t even remember what he wrote, but he was just angry about what he had seen. According to the lawsuit, his comment was:

“If this steroid addicted Nazi has children, they must be sooooo embarrassed.”

In other words, your typical YouTube-style comment. Sure, you could argue that claiming he was “steroid-addicted” and a “Nazi” might qualify as defamation, but taken in context, would anyone reading that comment really believe that the commenter knew Officers Josephs and was actually alleging he was addicted to steroids and a Nazi, or would they assume that it was just someone upset by the way Officer Josephs acted.

In the meantime, by filing this lawsuit, about the only thing that Office Bubbles has done is call a lot more attention to his initial actions and reinforce the idea that he seems to totally overreact to rather benign situations. But, I guess, if you’re going to arrest a girl for blowing bubbles in your direction, suing YouTube (for being a 3rd party platform) and suing people for mocking comments that no one actually believes probably seems to be equally intelligent.

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Comments on “Officer Bubbles Sues To Find Out Identity Of Anonymous YouTubers”

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104 Comments
Marcus Carab (profile) says:

I can’t help but think the police must be pretty annoyed at him for this. They are already facing a lot of scrutiny over their actions at the G20 – something like five separate reviews/inquiries are underway, with more perhaps to come – and they just barely managed to prevent a total public relations breakdown. There is already lots in the press about the somewhat questionable prosecution of G20 demonstrators – such as banning them from talking to the media – and I doubt the police are happy about getting more negative attention just because one cop wants to throw a temper tantrum.

ChrisB (profile) says:

Re: Re:

> They are already facing a lot of scrutiny over their
> actions at the G20

As a Canadian, I was horrified about the G20 summit for two reasons: the $1.1B price tag, and why there was so much footage of “protesters” smashing cars and windows.

Maybe I’m old, but why weren’t these tight black jean, ironic t-shirt wearing terrorists being shot left and right with bean-bag shotguns, stun guns, and tear gas? Oh, so not agreeing with capitalism allows you to take a bat to a storefront window? And then we get the ridiculous charge that the police were out of line? Give me a f**kin break. I’m not going to be happy until I see several dozen d-bag college kids serve real jail time for the destruction that happened.

kyle clements (profile) says:

Re: Re: Re:

The reason that many believe the police were out of line during the G20 is simple.

The violent destructive rioting happened on Saturday. The police did nothing.
The brutal police reaction happened on Sunday, after the rioting had stopped.

Its one thing to use force to break up a violent riot. It’s quite another to use force to break up a group of people who are singing the national anthem.

Marcus Carab (profile) says:

Re: Re: Re:

I’m not so concerned about the black bloc folks as I am about the 1000+ people who were arrested and forced into a highly disorganized temporary detention centre (read: prison camp) where their rights were stretched to the breaking point if not outright violated. This despite the fact that the vast majority of them were peaceful demonstrators, and that among them were several people with no role in the demonstrations at all – including one couple who were leaving a restaurant, and a young woman who was just walking home from work. Keep in mind that the mayor had been on television that very day encouraging Toronto residents to go out and enjoy the downtown area because everything was under control.

Look, I don’t want to be too hard on the police, and I certainly don’t know all the details of what happened that weekend – but what we have seen and heard from people on both sides have left a lot of big questions that need to be answers. At the end of the day, when 1000 people get arrested in a weekend in my city and I see footage of armed riot police charging peaceful crowds, I expect a very thorough post-mortem of the incident.

ChrisB (profile) says:

Re: Re: Re: Re:

> I would almost think ChrisB is serious but he is a
> Techdirt insider.

Don’t read too much into being an “Insider”. It just means I had $35 laying around.

And I’m about 72% serious. But I still think it would be funny to see some emo smash-and-grabber with gauged out ears get bean-bagged upside the head.

Marcus Carab (profile) says:

Re: Re: Re:2 Re:

Is it really necessary to attack their earrings? See, that’s what makes it hard to take you seriously – what could be a rational point instead comes across as the complaints of a crotchety old man who doesn’t like what the damn kids are wearing these days.

By my count, in this comment you have one complaint about their actions, and two about their style of dress/accessories (emo / earrings). In your original comment you again have one reference to their actions, plus two to their clothes and one to the fact that they are “college kids”.

Sounds to me like their protest tactics aren’t the real source of your ire.

Agnes says:

Re: Re: Re:

As a former organiser for peaceful anti-war and anti-capitalist demonstrations, at a brief time in history around 2003 when we actually cooperated with police to let the people who wanted to march and shout have their chance to let off steam without endangering their safety or anyone else’s, as well as organising educational sessions regarding human injustice all over the world, I was deeply ashamed by the G20 protests and the protesters in general in 2010. The police also behaved as we had already seen would happen increasingly, and it is a real shame, and very sad. Innocent people were harmed, along with their businesses, protesters decided to be an angry violent mob, and police were fed up and acting as such. It was a disgrace to the name of peace, equality and civil rights. It is the duty of both good civilians, anti-capitalist or not, and police officers to repair and properly build or rebuild their relationship with each other. We can only have a properly functioning society, and move towards real justice, when we work with each other, not against. Also, the police are not the G20, they are not the Iraq War, they are not the ones behind it, thus the action taken against them at demonstrations has nothing to do with the purpose of said demonstrations, but with personal vendetta, most often aimed at the wrong individual(s). I saw what was potentially good slide downwards. I remember when streets were closed off just for us to march down, and now it is just a big mess. I remember when officers would walk along side us and keep traffic on one side of the road, without saying a word to anyone, letting people do their thing, and I remember later being thrown from my bicycle for no reason, randomly, and a girl being hit hard in the face for defending me, and worse things happening as time went on. It ebbs and flows, with relations between civilians and officers changing drastically and rapidly. Let’s all move in the right direction together, shall we?

ChurchHatesTucker (profile) says:

Re: Question....

It’s called ‘being the biggest asshole in the room’ and is a pretty standard policing tactic for projecting authority these days, unfortunately (I’m sure they call it something different.) Constable Adam “Bubbles” Josephs seems to be taking this attitude to the courts.

I don’t know much about Canadian courts, but this may pay off for him, even if the suit doesn’t. He’s demonstrated a willingness to be unreasonably aggressive on the legal front as well and that may dissuade suits or even speech by the victims of his official behavior, as well as giving his superiors something to consider if they think to discipline him.

Free Capitalist (profile) says:

Re: Re: Assault with a cuddly bubble?

Next demonstration, I’m totally bringing a comfy chair…

No one expects the Canadian Inquisition!

What Wayne says (earlier semi-anon comment):

strange that ignorance is no excuse for obeying the law, only for enforcing it

Whoever came up with that get bonus miles for Clarity.

Anonymous Coward says:

Really? How would you like to have a job where you have to put up with some weird person sitting and blowing bubbles on you? Do you really think she would have behaved like a normal person if he had asked her nicely? She was looking for trouble and found it. Good for the Constable, people should be held accountable for their actions and she had no right to be the pest you know she was being.

Dark Helmet (profile) says:

Re: Re:

“Really? How would you like to have a job where you have to put up with some weird person sitting and blowing bubbles on you?”

That isn’t the question. The question is whether or not she broke the law. It’s hard to see how she did….

“Do you really think she would have behaved like a normal person if he had asked her nicely?”

I guess we’ll never know since Constable Bubblelicious never tried….

“She was looking for trouble and found it.”

She. Was. Blowing. Bubbles. I found her muffin top jeans to be more offensive than the bubbles. As trouble goes, her brand is fairly benign….

“Good for the Constable, people should be held accountable for their actions and she had no right to be the pest you know she was being.”

Wait….what? People don’t have the right to be pests? I’m pretty sure they do….

Dark Helmet (profile) says:

Re: Re: Re:

“I hate to defend officer asshole, but yes, blowing a soapy substance that could contain other unknown chemicals into someone’s face is at the very least rude.”

Sigh, I know that actually makes a lot of sense, but can’t the officer determine based on the situation what deserves an aggressive reaction? This girl hardly looked like an Anthrax-bubble blowing terrorist.

Unless…wait…her name wasn’t B’uhabbel Muffantop, was it?

vivaelamor (profile) says:

Re: Re:

“Really? How would you like to have a job where you have to put up with some weird person sitting and blowing bubbles on you? Do you really think she would have behaved like a normal person if he had asked her nicely? She was looking for trouble and found it. Good for the Constable, people should be held accountable for their actions and she had no right to be the pest you know she was being.”

I guess that you know something I don’t and that the person blowing bubbles was lying in the interview where she said: “I was having a conversation with a female officer and I even asked her if my bubbles bothered her. She smiled and shrugged it off so I figured it didn’t…. It’s not like I was throwing stuff at them. Then this big officer marches over and he’s totally in my face.”

The officer was an asshole. The ‘weird person’ blowing bubbles treated the asshole with a lot more respect than he was due. The police use tear gas to deal with protesters but you assert that the protesters shouldn’t be allowed to blow bubbles? That sort of thinking leads to people expressing themselves in much worse ways than blowing bubbles.

As for looking for trouble.. she was there as part of a peaceful protest. She was protesting peacefully. He was interfering with her peaceful protest. Therefore, he was the one looking for trouble.

Kevin Carson (user link) says:

Re: Re:

Just about anyone who works in a service job of any kind — retail, food service, healthcare — that involves dealing with the general public, has to put up with a hell of a lot more from people than that. Most employers have taken the “customer is always right” philosophy beyond the point of absurdity, to the point where no matter how abusive or psychotic a customer is you have to say “Thank you sir–would you prefer I spit or swallow?” I write from experience. In the hospital where I work, the patient or their family can be screaming abuse at you, and if they complain because you looked at them crossways the administration will throw you under the bus. All the pet gimmicks — the Studer Group, Press Ganey surveys, and all the rest of it — take the whole concept of “customer satisfaction” to the point of servile self-abasement. If a visitor blew bubbles on me I’d be reprimanded for a single word of complaint.

KC (profile) says:

Re: Anonymous Coward

Wow, how could you get so many things wrong. The female officer, who didn’t mind the bubbles, was talking to her on a different matter. Const. Josephs came over from several meters away and threatened her with arrest. She wasn’t blowing bubbles on him.

She was later arrested on yet another matter but was subsequently released without charges as most were.

She is a normal person, she was there as a Street Medic. Scoff if you will but there is nothing illegal or sinister about that. She acted like a normal person even when she wasn’t asked nicely.

She wasn’t looking for trouble nor did she end up in any legal trouble. Do you think Constable Josephs has far more problems

Anonymous Coward says:

Re: Response to: Anonymous Coward on Oct 18th, 2010 @ 9:39am

“She was looking for trouble and found it. Good for the Constable”

Despite what you think, you aren’t allowed to arrest people for taunting you or being an asshole. What if I made a funny face at an officer? Grounds for arrest? What if I said “I smell bacon” to my friend when a cop rolls by? Should I be arrested? What if I saw a cop beating a retarded person and I said “you should be ashamed”. It’s called freedom of speech buddy. Sorry to burst your bubble (lol)

iamtheky (profile) says:

So would you defend her:

dumping the whole bottle of fluid on the officer?

how about she just spits it one straw full at a time?

hows about she mists it with a spray bottle on ‘very fine’?

how about she inflates every ml one by one and blows them over?

Either way, the contents of the bottle are being dispensed, method of transmission will matter little.

Nastybutler77 (profile) says:

Re: Re:

Either way, the contents of the bottle are being dispensed, method of transmission will matter little.

That’s moronic. That’s like saying it doesn’t matter if 20 grams of copper clad lead are tossed underhand at you or shot out of a rifle. Personally, I’d much rather have it tossed underhand at me, but I guess you don’t have a preference since the method of transmission doesn’t matter.

If you’re the key, that’s one dumb lock.

Nastybutler77 (profile) says:

Re: Re: Re: Re:

I didn’t realize that the effect of an unknown chemical is wholly dependent on how fast it’s going….

(S)he said that the method used to transmit the soap solution (a known chemical, btw) mattered little, and I begged to differ.

The effect of any matter on a body is dependant on several factors; acceleration being one of them. Mass being another. The fact that a bubble can’t travel fast enough and isn’t dense enough to cause harm is relevant to wheather it can be classified as assault. If you were to squirt that same solution in an officer’s eye with a high pressure squirt gun, he would surely have more grounds for an arrest.

Does that make sense or am I missing the point?

DS says:

Re: Re: Re:2 Re:

Nope, you are still missing the point. If I gently waft a misty dew of pepper spray into your eye, you are going to feel the effects. In my no basis in fact opinion, a cloud of pepper spray would generally do more damage than a condensed pressure stream. That’s why campers who need to keep bears away use a pepper spray that’s a misty cloud, and not the the anti-dog Halt brand.

Spointman says:

Reason for arrest?

I find it curious that there’s no mention or video in the recording of what the bubbles girl did (or didn’t do) between being threatened with arrest and actually getting arrested. The video implies that there were a number of arrests for frivolous reasons (and I’m sure that will get hashed out in court). However, nothing is explicitly said about the bubbles girl — not even in the extended video they link.

vivaelamor (profile) says:

Re: Reason for arrest?

“I find it curious that there’s no mention or video in the recording of what the bubbles girl did (or didn’t do) between being threatened with arrest and actually getting arrested. The video implies that there were a number of arrests for frivolous reasons (and I’m sure that will get hashed out in court). However, nothing is explicitly said about the bubbles girl — not even in the extended video they link.”

I gather from comments on another article that the girl was arrested later for carrying eyewash (commonly used by protesters to deal with tear gas). Afaik, she stopped blowing bubbles when she said she would and the arrest was unrelated.

MrWilson says:

Re: Re: By the definition of assault...

The problem of course is Officer Bubbles’ reasoning. He said that if the bubbles touched him, it was assault. He was wearing sunglasses, so there was no danger of the detergent getting in his eyes. He then stated that it was a detergent and could get in the other constables’ eyes. But he threatened arrest if the bubbles touched him, not the other constable. He was in no danger of the so-called threat of detergent in the eyes, but concluded it was assault if he (or his clothing) was touched by a bubble.

But beyond all that, he was already looking for trouble. He assumed malice in the blowing of bubbles where there doesn’t seem to be. The girl looks deeply hurt at the tone he took with her. She didn’t yell back. She didn’t get keyed up and ready to fight.

The other constable next to him is the perfect control subject for this assertion. She was calm. She didn’t tell the girl to stop blowing bubbles despite the fact that she wasn’t wearing sunglasses. She didn’t say anything rude. She was even smiling.

Blal0ck says:

Go police

I am tired of those “peace” movements..
I say f*ck islam Yes I said it.& I say all those who suported should be arrested…
And what is it normal to stand infront of a police officer and blow bubbles on him?
It’s disrespectfull & I wish she would be punished for it…the police officer was actually very pleasent & tolerant…police in other place would already hand cuff her & through her in jail at the very minimum

Will Accostya says:

People....

I for one side with the officer. The general public are retards who generally act like they are entitled to do stupid shit. And these types of people protesting for nothing more than to cause trouble need to get a life. This chick is probably nothing more than a bored collage student, who was too stupid to listen to the cop who gave her a stern warning (too stern, I agree there). She was stupid enough not to listen, and was arrested, period.

Acidsikeo says:

Wow.

Does anyone see how friggin’ wrong that cop was? Did he used to be a Corrections Officer? If not, he needs to be. Irritating bubbles, or not, this man should not be a cop. Look at his neck muscles, Josephs was seething with anger. This could have gone far better. Josephs is a hot-head, obvious from watching just a few seconds of that exchange. Wayyyy overreacted. He could have asked to cease, when polite diplomacy failed, use threat diplomacy. If that girl were purposely doing that expressly to piss him off, that is technically assault. It would be the same manner as a verbal threat, and he could have politely asked her to stop while telling her that he could arrest her. When she says, “yeah?” the first time in that provactive tone, he could have answered her plainly and affirmitively, and to just please stop. If this guy is allowed to continue being on the street with people, who will intentionally piss you off from time to time, he is going to hurt someone. Mister glasses there, take yer glasses off too. It looks like you’re hiding.
And, I don’t know all that much about the chemistry of the common blowy bubble, but I do know this; it will not hurt your eyes. I’ve had a lot of them bubbles in my eyes, it just happens, my eyes are still less corrective lenses.

Randomguy says:

I have to disagree with most here.
I think his actions were completely justifiable.

There are two points of interest that aren’t being taken into account from this film, and it’s whats not seen.

1. The video doesn’t show why the altercation began in the first place.

2. The video doesn’t show why the woman was actually arrested.

It’s a common tactic used by the media to keep people riled up and jumping to conclusions, and there is simply too many “Moments Later..” for me to just blindly believe she was arrested for the reasons the clip would like me to believe she was arrested for.

The simple fact is that this man was doing his job, and this woman was being an obvious pest, deliberately. He could have gone about it better, sure, but in the same hand, he couldn’t let this demonstrator undermine his authority either. After all, one person undermining a public official’s authority becomes two. Two becomes four. You know the rest from there.

If you really think this officer was wrong in his actions, you’re always welcome to walk up to the next Police Officer you see, and blow bubbles in his/her face and see how long it takes before you get arrested.

Padre (profile) says:

Re: Randomguy

“The simple fact is that this man was doing his job, and this woman was being an obvious pest, deliberately. He could have gone about it better, sure, but in the same hand, he couldn’t let this demonstrator undermine his authority either. After all, one person undermining a public official’s authority becomes two. Two becomes four. You know the rest from there.”

60 years ago the Nazi’s were just doing their job. Those Jews were being obvious pests, deliberately. The Nazis could of gone about it better, sure, but in the same hand, they couldn’t let them undermine their authority either. After all, one person refusing to go to the camps becomes two. Two becomes four. You know the rest from there.

Yes I think he was wrong in his actions. No I won’t walk up to the next Police Officer I see. No more so than I would walk up to Crips, Bloods or Hell’s Angels for the same reason. I choose to avoid contact with organized criminals. Especially the ones I can’t defend against without being subjected to the angry monkey version of a fire ant attack.

Peace, out.

American Psycho says:

Was Bubbles the worst?

Was Officer Bubbles really the worst? He is an obnoxious mentally ill man who should not be a police officer.
But check out another G20 GOOF- Sergeant Mark Charlebois 815 of District 2 York Regional Police.

Aside from his disgraceful and embarrassing clown act at G20:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OuuidLpIZHI

Previous to this old senile Goof signing up for G20 he was or completed investigations for:
– assault on a handcuffed prisoner
– sexual inappropriate behavior on a 14 year old “victim” in a District 2 washroom, caught on video
– being under the influence on the job
He is also a “close and dear” friend of York Regional Police Chief Eric Jolliffe.

So when you let these psychos loose on downtown Toronto do you expect any different?

American Psycho says:

Was Officer Bubbles really the worst? He is an obnoxious mentally ill man who should not be a police officer.
But check out another G20 GOOF- Sergeant Mark Charlebois 815 of District 2 York Regional Police.

Aside from his disgraceful and embarrassing clown act at G20:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OuuidLpIZHI

Previous to this old senile Goof signing up for G20 he was or completed investigations for:
– assault on a handcuffed prisoner
– sexual inappropriate behavior on a 14 year old “victim” in a District 2 washroom, caught on video
– being under the influence on the job
He is also a “close and dear” friend of York Regional Police Chief Eric Jolliffe.

So when you let these psychos loose on downtown Toronto do you expect any different?

CPP Party says:

Detective Mark Charlebois=Diddler

As of April 20,2011 it is DETECTIVE Mark Charlebois, #815 of the York Regional Police. He is no longer a Sergeant. He was quietly demoted. Not because this G20 Gaffe. He was demoted because a complaint was made that he was sexually inappropriate in accompanying a 14 year old female in custody to the washroom while he was “interviewing” her. He also was under previous investigations for sexually inappropriateness with young offenders in custody. The guy is a creep.

Needless to say his neighbors in Aurora have been posting some “interesting” facts about the creep. The question remains: Why would the York Regional Police allow such a loose canon out of the York Region Police cage? He basically is the face of police stupidly and incompetence in Ontario.

Dirty Mo says:

Idiots

These cops are pussies.They hide behind a badge because they are scared and little cowards. This pedophile / pld geezer Detective Mark Charlebois is a little man go nowhere idiot hiding behind a badge.
This Bubbles is a coward little asswipe hiding behind a badge. These guys become cops because they are power hungry nobodies. The easiest way to power for an idiot with no talent is become a pig.

charmain c says:

Detective Mark Charlebois #815 sexually assaulted my daughter while she went to the washroom at District 2 police station. My daughter was 14 years old at the time and was there because her friend was charged for shop lifting at Hillcrest Mall on Yonge Street. No charges were laid against my daughter.

The OIPRD refused to investigate saying they “had no jurisdiction” on the crime. Chief Eric Jolliffe refused to investigate saying she was lying without an investigation and no police officer would investigate and only harassed her and my family.

No charges were laid and no justice was done. Since this time I have learned that 2 York Regional Police officers were charged for sexual assault (Cst. Noor Khan and Cst. Brent Rouillard).

The York Regional Police force is sick, twisted and corrupt. They can not be trusted and females must be aware of how sick and twisted these individuals are. Do not trust the YRP and do not trust Detective Mark Charlebois #815. He is a rapist, a pervert and a sick and twisted individual as are many other York Regional Police officers. They will lie and cover up their crimes.

My daughter has been traumatized and will suffer for the remainder of her life because of this monster. I understand this pervert and creep did this to many others and it is always covered up. SHAME!!

Gunpro says:

My hat goes off to the guy it’s hard to be a pussy and a prick at the same time she wasn’t being a pest he just couldn’t take a few bubbles I’ve seen 5 yr olds blow bubbles at each other and take it that poor girl he just hates bubbles cuz he looks like mr clean and the scrubbing bathroom bubbles are his enemy like most cops he is a fucktard

John From NYC To Officer Bubbles says:

you silly dude you, you must be from canada or ohio or some weird place where there is nothing happening, i mean if you were a new york cop you would never overreact , buddy. NYPD has stress 24/7, my best friend is a officer, he would just smile at bubbles and tell the kids to behave, now you’re famous, if i ever see you i’ll just say hi officer bubbles lmao

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