GAO To The Rescue Again: Suggests Counterfeiting Not Nearly As Big A Problem As Industry Claims

from the hurray-GAO dept

We were recently pointing out that the Government Accountability Office (GAO) seems to be doing a consistently fantastic job cutting through bogus and misleading claims from politicians and corporations. They’ve trashed e-voting machine testing, pointed out that grandstanding politicians were wrong in suggesting file sharing resulted in more porn, told the FCC that the way it measures broadband competition is bogus (multiple times) and recently explained how the way the patent system is currently set up, it could be slowing down the development of new drugs, rather than speeding it up. It really is nice that the GAO hasn’t become politicized and really does take its job pretty seriously. The latest report from the GAO suggests (not too surprisingly) that all the whining you’ve been hearing about counterfeit products coming into the US, including the claim that 5 to 7% of world trade is in counterfeit products, is totally overblown. The GAO looked at the actual data and found that the numbers suggest a much, much smaller percentage of the economy is built on counterfeit goods.


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Comments on “GAO To The Rescue Again: Suggests Counterfeiting Not Nearly As Big A Problem As Industry Claims”

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20 Comments
squik says:

Go to China

Go to China and count the counterfeits. They don’t have to be imported to the US to economically damage a firm.

Of course, even if the number of counterfeits coming into the country from China are small, I don’t think you want this to happen:

http://www.nytimes.com/2007/05/06/world/americas/06poison.html?ex=1336104000&en=c771f0d98e2efc74&ei=5088&partner=rssnyt&emc=rss

counterfeit squik says:

How does Canadian law fix this?

“Go to China and count the counterfeits. They don’t have to be imported to the US to economically damage a firm.”

So how does Canada implementing some extreme law fix this problem in China where the law doesn’t apply?

If these goods aren’t being imported into Canada then no amount of extreme laws will fix the problem in Canada that doesn’t exist there.
Presumably the basic anti counterfeiting measures are enough.

Wyatt says:

Of course..

I read the article about the counterfeit drugs, it was concerning to say the least. But that still doesn’t down play what they are saying. Counterfeiting (in my opinion), or the bloating of its existence is another excuse for companies to have tighter laws for profit. They want it to seem like a big problem so the government will take extreme steps to prevent it. This would include laws that hinder growth by limiting the ability of companies to produce legitimate generic brands and such.

I’m betting that in a very short time, if the GAO continues to expose the truth about things that they will go down that political road of BS a lies. Wait until this organization is seen as good in the eyes of Americans, and then have them slowly inject lies. Of course the lies will be believed at first because they are repeatable. This country has got major problems with honesty and integrity. Nothing has stayed good for long, and by the looks of it nothing will.

Yes, I am a pessimist when it comes to the US government. How could you not be anymore..

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