Ben S’s Techdirt Profile

kagenooni

About Ben S




Ben S’s Comments comment rss

  • Jan 28th, 2014 @ 10:21am

    Re: Re:

    I doubt it. Being overlooked for such a title would make them quite pleased.

  • Jan 27th, 2014 @ 7:35am

    Re: Re: Not suprised

    I don't have access to any documentation really, and none of it that I've seen is incriminating. Also, screwing up computer systems (and badly) isn't illegal. Disturbing, definitely, incompetent, absolutely, but legal.

  • Jan 27th, 2014 @ 7:21am

    Not suprised

    As an employee of ACS, faulty computer software causing serious problems is sadly not a surprise. Although, I wasn't in the company around the time of most of the other issues in the article (loss of personal information or credit cards), I have been witness to some very serious computer issues. At one point it was occuring nearly twice a week, and serious enough to bring the entire set of systems we work with to a halt.

  • Dec 30th, 2013 @ 11:49am

    Re: Re: Re:

    Communism isn't about removing the rights of the citizens, and could theoretically be achieved with out doing that. Communism is supposed to be about preventing the regular masses from being exploited by the rich. A government with supreme power is the method used for this, because it makes it harder for a business to try and influence it. It was great in theory, but failed in practice. Yes, the communist governments that formed did remove all ideas of privacy, but that isn't actually a part of what communism is about.

  • Nov 24th, 2013 @ 9:13pm

    (untitled comment)

    My favorite part about that cancer comment is how spot on it is. The cancer will eventually kill the patient if left unchecked.

  • Nov 23rd, 2013 @ 6:16am

    Perhaps the aim isn't what it seems

    After reading the article, I noticed Masnick mention that the Beastie Boyz have been trying to shy away from the song. Perhaps this is yet another foolish attempt to try and hide something that they feel causes embarrassment. Get rid of the Girls parody, make people once again forget about the original. But, as we all know, that pretty much always fails.

  • Nov 11th, 2013 @ 10:04am

    Just a wild guess

    I'm guessing Hague has seen some speculation regarding intelligence capabilities that are accurate, but not yet revealed. He's likely just trying to cover up what ever speculation he saw, which leaves one to guess what speculation it was.

  • Sep 13th, 2013 @ 10:18am

    (untitled comment)

    Title makes me think "For the democracy!"

  • Sep 11th, 2013 @ 9:03am

    Re:

    If "an outsider" did something like this, I would expect the NSA to create talking points about terrorists hacking us, and using it as an excuse to demand more power and funding, than it already has right now.

  • Sep 3rd, 2013 @ 10:26am

    Re:

    You know, there's a reason some feel government intelligence is an oxymoron.

  • Sep 3rd, 2013 @ 10:05am

    Re: Re:

    The point being made is 20% of applicants, as a whole, is most likely inaccurate. For example, if out of all the applicants they interview, only 20% raise flags, and 20% of those have the terrorist ties, you're sitting at 4% of all applicants having terrorist ties is all, not the 20% as per the title.

    Also worth noting, since they don't specify what counts as a terrorist tie, that number might also be inaccurate. Imagine that NSA feels a chance encounter while shopping at a store with some one the NSA suspects counts as a "tie", or your mother's ex-husband's second cousin twice removed is suspected as a terrorist. Once again, the tie is not one that you can really see as realistic. The numbers here just aren't all that informative. Far more worrying is the history of the whole interviewing process that was described, including "contractors being caught interviewing dead people" and falsifying background checks.

  • Aug 28th, 2013 @ 8:25am

    (untitled comment)

    Part of the reason the DoJ isn't concerned with the way these bankers uses these funds is they are going to have to pay the money back, with interest, eventually. Some of the banks are constantly paying interest back to the government as well, so this is a bit of a cash cow for them. Would you care if you "bailed" some one out with your money, while constantly having them pay you back interest over the course of several years, knowing eventually you'll get back everything you spent and more, and the person you bailed out misused the money?

  • Aug 20th, 2013 @ 9:07am

    Re: Re: Re:

    Geeks already have been. BitMessage is one such example. Functions like email, except your "address" in this instance is actually a public encryption key, with a private key locally saved. Data transmitted between computers/servers on the way to destinations do not have the ultimate source or destination IP addresses, only the current computer's IP address, and the next computer in line to receive the data. When you connect, you simply download a copy of all the encrypted data, filter for anything with your public key, unencrypt and store in your Inbox, and forward anything that's not yours received further down the line. The result is that any message you send out, goes to literally everyone connected to the system, yet only the recipient can read it. Anyone snooping on your connection won't be able to distinguish between which messages are yours, vs some one else's.

    It's still in testing, and looking for independent security experts to audit the encryption system to confirm the level of security they're after, but they have had some people examining the encryption and trying to break it already, then reporting their results. It's a work in progress, but already it's functioning quite well.

  • Aug 20th, 2013 @ 8:58am

    Re: ...Yada! ...Yada!

    That's a false equivalency you propose. Assuming one would find it funny to catch some one in the act (I personally wouldn't), walking in at the wrong time is not the same as setting up cameras in the room so one can keep a record of each and every time it happens.

    I'm not sure what you're referring to with your "bought credentials", you referring to a diploma? With any decent school, that's not something you simply buy, but something you must work for, and earn. You not only need to know the information being presented, but must be able to demonstrate the ability to use it. Even so, I'm not sure what this has to do with the mass surveillance state.

    Not turning down information about a competitor, once again, isn't the actively looking for the information, or worse, following them, and copying down their every activity.

    The things you describe aren't even remotely similar to the spying going on, so I'm not sure why you thought to compare coming across information to actively seeking to remove privacy in order to obtain it.

  • Aug 20th, 2013 @ 8:20am

    Re: Re: Re: "psychological impact"? -- Mike, they've built concentration camps!

    That's why I use Ghostery to block stuff like that.

  • Aug 17th, 2013 @ 7:11am

    Re: Re:

    Sorry, I hit the wrong link, that was supposed to be in reply to Ross.

  • Aug 17th, 2013 @ 7:10am

    Re:

    That's not necessarily true. If the officers are coming with a warrant for specific information, and not one from the secret courts, it means the request was subject to actual oversight, and deemed worthy of obtaining the information because law enforcement was able to prove there's just cause to have that information revealed.

  • Aug 17th, 2013 @ 7:08am

    Re: Re: What's the next Lavabit?

    I forgot to mention, the keys aren't really interacted with by the user, merely saved then used automatically as needed. Aside from your public key acting as an email address, you don't need to see the keys at all. The public key is also just text, so one can copy/paste the one line as a key quite easily. This gets rid of the hassle for the casual user, while still providing the protection you're after.

  • Aug 17th, 2013 @ 7:04am

    Re: What's the next Lavabit?

    BitMessage is an attempt at a completely distributed email service using public/private key pairs. Your public key also acts as your email address with this system. They're currently looking for security experts to test the current cryptography, so there is a question as to the degree of security, but there has been at least one person to answer the call, break the crypto, and send the creators of the program a fix for the issue.

  • Aug 5th, 2013 @ 7:21am

    Re: Re: Re: Rep. Mike Rogers

    With that quote, you've got to take the context into consideration. The "eye of the needle" was a term that referred to the archway entering into certain larger cities. It was too small for the camel to just walk through. Getting the camel through required a fairly significant amount of work, it wasn't an easy task, but it was possible.

More comments from Ben S >>