Danny’s Techdirt Profile

dmittleman

About Danny

Dr. Daniel Mittleman is an Associate Professor at DePaul University’s College of Computing and Digital Media. His research focuses on collaboration engineering, virtual teamwork, and the design of both collaboration and learning spaces. His projects include investigation of collaboration aboard US Navy ships; development of team processes to support architectural planning, collaborative writing, and brainstorming; and the design of technology-supported collaboration facilities. Dr. Mittleman holds an AB and MBA from Washington University (St. Louis) and a Ph.D. from the University of Arizona, and is currently Past Chair and Webmaster of the Environmental Design Research Association.

http://www.linkedin.com/in/dannymittleman



Danny’s Comments comment rss

  • Apr 19th, 2013 @ 6:40pm

    Comment from the Irony Department

    I note the "Overreaction Department" tag line on the post.

    The firm is taking very reasonable steps to protect their data (and their clients' data). Agreed the security risk is the employee, not the technology. But they rightly recognize that no amount of training will completely eliminate employees mistakes, especially since the scammers keep inventing new ruses.

    And the firm is taking the reasonable step of mounting a new network outside their firewall to support employee access to personal accounts. So the firm isn't trying to wall off access completely during the workday, an action that would be problematic on several dimensions.

    I'd say the overreaction here is on the part of our poster, not on the part of the law firm.

  • Apr 17th, 2013 @ 3:56pm

    Two other disadvantages of separate leg bookings

    Not only does one lose out on the airline looking out for you with delayed flights (as was mentioned on Twitter to Mike), but I suspect there are a few other losses as well.

    1. If you do have to re-book do to missed flights or change of plans, you would get hit with a separate change fee for each leg.

    2. My recollection from doing the separate leg thing in the past we that I couldn't get them to check my bags all the way through.

    I was separately buying legs of a contiguous trip. Mike seems to be buying legs with stopovers, so this constraint wouldn't apply to him.

  • Apr 8th, 2013 @ 12:16pm

    Re: Re: Anti-copying verbiage

    Colin, I suggest clearly differentiating the violation of copyright from the violation of plagiarism. As I am sure you know, they are not the same thing; and you also know that an academic is much more worried about being caught plagiarizing than violating copyright.

    Regarding copyright: of course you have registered your copyright by now; if not, do so. As you already do, encourage people to link back to your site. As you probably know, there is no single clear cut test for fair use. What you might do (though it would have zero ti limited validity if ever tested in court) is lay out what you consider fair use to be for your document in the context of a website. Perhaps then, most would follow your guidelines and for those who do not, you would have a clear fallback position to guide them to make things right. A position that is less than your current absolutist position. You might also consider offering to license use of the document for a reasonable fee. Doing so, while it will never raise you significant revenue, will help establish a value should your copyright be violated--though asking price does not automatically constitute real market value. And it will make the free linking to option appear more desirable to many sites.

    Regarding plagiarism: I think, in as friendly a way possible, you should make clear that you find non-attributioned borrowing of your work, subsets of your work, and closely paraphrased versions of your work unacceptable. And you should clearly state you will pursue plagiarism cases against individuals and institutions who plagiarize this work.

    I think that will provoke much more notice among your academic audience than either the current or a revised copyright notice will.

    ASIDE: After I saw your story on Facebook last week, I recommended to a conference I am close to that we link to your site as I think your poster advice is great--and we have many grad student first time presenters who are not at all clear on how to organize or present a poster. Email me if you care to track who this is.

  • Apr 8th, 2013 @ 12:00pm

    Re: Re: You keep mistaking what sue-crazy lawyers do with copyright.

    At this point those lawyers are not going to sue. They are probably having a talk with their clients about that clear WayBack Machine proof that the article existed long before 2005 on Colin's site and the risks they take on for themselves by suing.

    All they got for their dollars to the law firm was a nasty legalgram that apparently both pissed off and scared Colin. They have got to be playing defense now.

    And the Purdue University General Counsel's Office can't be very pleased either.

    If Colin's lawyer sends a nastygram to both the Center AND to Purdue, I bet the Center backs down (without admitting guilt most likely), and says, in effect, no harm, no foul. At that point Colin needs to ask to be made whole for the expenses he has taken on in return for not going after them (assuming he previous,y registered his copyright and has good chance of collecting statutory damages, as the real financial damage is minimal.)

    IMHO (i am not a lawyer.)

  • Mar 12th, 2013 @ 8:20am

    Tim Tebow is available

    Where I come from, if your team is always punting, it is time to get a new quarterback.

  • Feb 1st, 2013 @ 9:11am

    Re: Re: Re:

    Griffith movie was "A Face in the Crowd" (1957) in which he played a disillusioned drifter (according to Wikipedia). I might have used the word grifter.

    In not this in a follow on comment as multi-tasking sucks on my iPad. I'd have lost my comment draft had I tried. Which, I guess is indirectly a testimonial for the Galaxy Pad--the object behind this whole [redacted by editor] commercial post.

    /not that Mike ever really redacts anything.

  • Feb 1st, 2013 @ 9:03am

    Re: Re:

    Very true.

    If you ever wondered what a young Andy Griffith did to merit having a TV show named for him, this is one of two things that made him famous (the other was a dark movie role of a smooth southern con man in the big city).

    The routine is every bit as good as George Carlin's comparison of football to baseball.

  • Feb 1st, 2013 @ 9:03am

    Re: Re:

    Very true.

    If you ever wondered what a young Andy Griffith did to merit having a TV show named for him, this is one of two things that made him famous (the other was a dark movie role of a smooth southern con man in the big city).

    The routine is every bit as good as George Carlin's comparison of football to baseball.

  • Jan 27th, 2013 @ 8:01am

    "I know it when I see it"

    Specific legal meaning:

    "I shall not today attempt further to define the kinds of material I understand to be embraced within that shorthand description "hard-core pornography"; and perhaps I could never succeed in intelligibly doing so. But **I know it when I see it**, and the motion picture involved in this case is not that.""
    —Justice Potter Stewart, concurring opinion in Jacobellis v. Ohio 378 U.S. 184 (1964), regarding possible obscenity in The Lovers.
    [cut and pasted from Wikipedia, emphasis added]

    So, if the definition of pornography is "I know it when I see it", then Apple's App Store decisions are always tautologically consistent. Q.E.D.

  • Jan 27th, 2013 @ 8:01am

    "I know it when I see it"

    Specific legal meaning:

    "I shall not today attempt further to define the kinds of material I understand to be embraced within that shorthand description "hard-core pornography"; and perhaps I could never succeed in intelligibly doing so. But **I know it when I see it**, and the motion picture involved in this case is not that.""
    —Justice Potter Stewart, concurring opinion in Jacobellis v. Ohio 378 U.S. 184 (1964), regarding possible obscenity in The Lovers.
    [cut and pasted from Wikipedia, emphasis added]

    So, if the definition of pornography is "I know it when I see it", then Apple's App Store decisions are always tautologically consistent. Q.E.D.

  • Nov 16th, 2012 @ 11:54am

    As someone who actually teaches with this technology

    I teach all levels of college. We don't have smart ebooks as described here, but we do have capabilities in our learning management system (Desire2Learn) to do much of what is suggested by Glyn's post. It contains a plagiarism detection system, and--if I am careful in how I embed reading assignments directly into D2L content, I can get a report of how long the student was engaged with the content (though I don't know how focused they were during that engagements period--a student who knows this meter is there and wants to game the system can do so.)

    The issue is not whether or not to build these tools; rather the issue is how we use these tools to enhance education. Most of us agree that tools should not be prohibited simply because they can be misused--as almost any tool can be misused. Rather, policy, ethics, and teacher education should suggest constructive use of tools to enhance education.

  • Nov 9th, 2012 @ 1:44pm

    Isnt it ironic, dontcha think?

    I find it ironic that one of Romney's principal selling points was that he was a world class business manager, while Obama had been only a /sneer/ community organizer.

  • Oct 19th, 2012 @ 9:14pm

    Re: Re: Did Coursera really have to comply?

    Cant see how the commerce clause is relevant. If they aren't charging money, then this is clearly a first mend meant issue. The state cannot make law that would limit academic speech. Academic speech is not only protected speech, it is very speech that merits extra consideration for protection (as does political speech). IMHO.

    Lack of protection of academic speech creates a slippery slope toward the government declaring which knowledge is legitimate, and which is forbidden to teach. It would be like living in Galileo's Rome, or in Rick Perry's Texas. And I don't think we want anything like either in today's America.

  • Oct 4th, 2012 @ 6:29am

    Re: Re: Re: I've got to ask

    My comment as well: it has got to be in the one million range.

  • Aug 21st, 2012 @ 6:09pm

    I have a dream

    Someday, if you will allow me to dream, we will have a black president or a black attorney general and this pointless race profiling will stop.

  • Jul 27th, 2012 @ 9:51pm

    Thank you NBC

    i suggested to my wife over lunch today that we turn on the opening ceremonies. Found they weren't there and not scheduled until 6:30pm in Chicago. We had 7pm dinner plans at home (a guest came over), so we recorded them and watched at 10 when our guest left.

    It was great. Since it isn't live anyway, it really doesn't matter if we watch it when it airs, or a little bi later. We were able to kip all th commercials and see about two hours of show in 90 minutes (I wish we'd skipped the rap too).

    My wife is still watching; I had my fill. Anyway, this slight personal delay worked so well we I'll do it for je rest of the games. So thanks NBC for showing us that not watching live means not watching commercials.

  • Jul 27th, 2012 @ 9:48pm

    Thank you NBC

    i suggested to my wife over lunch today that we turn on the opening ceremonies. Found they weren't there and not scheduled until 6:30pm in Chicago. We had 7pm dinner plans at home (a guest came over), so we recorded them and watched at 10 when our guest left.

    It was great. Since it isn't live anyway, it really doesn't matter if we watch it when it airs, or a little bi later. We were able to kip all th commercials and see about two hours of show in 90 minutes (I wish we'd skipped the rap too).

    My wife is still watching; I had my fill. Anyway, this slight personal delay worked so well we I'll do it for je rest of the games. So thanks NBC for showing us that not watching live means not watching commercials.

  • Jun 13th, 2012 @ 10:08am

    Vultures, all of 'em

    Anyone notice how funny it is that a lawyer is named Carreon?

  • May 18th, 2012 @ 10:49am

    I've gotta story like this too

    Ive posted in athe past on Techdirt that I used to work for Ticketmaster. The is an interesting TM story that I don't think ever made it into the public, so I will do it now.

    Back in the 1980s each TM city was on an independent computer system (PDP unibus systems with RM05 or CDC9766 disk drives. The drives were fixed removable boxes about the size of a washing machine, the removable disk platters about the size of the proverbial breadbox. Each platter held 256mb formatted.

    Each city had itts own operations policies, but generally, the systems ran with mirrored drives, the database was backed up every night, archival copies were made monthly. In Chicago, where I worked, we did not have offsite backup in the 1980s. The Bay Area had the most interesting system for offsite backup.

    The Bay Area BASS operation, bought by TM in the mid 1980s, had a deal with a taxi driver. They would make their nightly backup copies in house, and make an extra copy on a spare disk platter. Tis cabbie would come by the office about 2am each morning, and they'd put the spare disk platter in his trunk, swapping it for the previous day's copy that had been his truck for 24 hours. So, for the cost of about two platters ($700 at the time) and whatever cash they'd pay the cabbie, they had a mobile offsite copy of their database circulating the Bay Area at all times.

    When the World Series earthquake hit in October 1988, the TM office in downtown Oakland was badly damaged. The only copy of the database that survived was the copy in the taxi cab.

    That incident led TM corporate to establish much more sophisticated and redundant data redundancy policies.

  • May 18th, 2012 @ 10:27am

    Re: exactly = where are the countersuits?

    At some point in the future when one of these officers is testifying at an unrelated case, the defense attorney will show this to the jury to demonstrate that the officer is willing to lie under oath, and therefore should not be believed in the case at hand.

    Someone else will get off, but if it happens often enough perhaps the police departments will self police a bit better.

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