Shane C’s Techdirt Profile

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About Shane C




Shane C’s Comments comment rss

  • Dec 19th, 2013 @ 8:46am

    (untitled comment)

    Well, glitter is the herpes of the art world...

  • Sep 21st, 2012 @ 7:32pm

    Don't forget!

    Don't forget the after/hidden panel! :)
    http://www.smbc-comics.com/comics/20120920after.gif

  • Jun 22nd, 2012 @ 12:26pm

    Technically speaking, there's currently a way to implament this now

    Unfortunately I'm the barer of bad news here, so I'll start off with saying explicitly that I DO NOT CONDONE ANY PART OF WHAT I'M ABOUT TO EXPLAIN. I've been trying for the past few months to get the main stream media to pick up the story, alas with no luck.

    A technique that is nicely called "HTTPS Snooping" (or more accurately called Man-In-The-Middle-Attack http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Man-in-the-middle_attack), is available from companies like Cisco, and Websense. These solutions are currently deployed at companies that are snooping on their employees.

    Most companies fear malware, and corporate espionage, and thus justify snooping on private communications of their employees. More respectable companies limit what they can see to things like GMail, and unknown addresses. Less respectable companies (like I've ran across) snoop all traffic, including banking, and health care. Would you really want your fellow employees to know your bank account balance, or what medications you're currently taking? How about your boss?

    All of this happens by terminating the HTTPS connection at at a border, or firewall system. The traffic is then decrypted, scanned, re-encrypted and transferred to the end user. All of this works because the end user's system is told to accept the local certificate from the firewall system. The User doesn't recognize that anything is going on, because to their browser, the certificate is valid, and it's encrypted. So to them, everything is working perfectly, and they have no clue that their traffic is being snooped on. When they transmit back (say their login/password information) all of their communications simply reverse the process. The information is encrypted with the local firewall certificate, transmitted to that firewall, decrypted, scanned, and re-encrypted for the end system using the official certificate from that site.

    Right now, these systems are deployed on large, paranoid corporate networks. However, it scales very simply. All an ISP would have to do is deploy a larger system (or array of systems) to do the same thing. They could convince their end users to use this system, by telling them to "Install This Network Acceleration Software," that would install their local certificate, and proxy all the traffic through their systems.

    With government assistance, they could force say Network Solutions to issue a certificate that is officially signed for all networks. Then the local ISP wouldn't have to require people to install their own local certificate. They could simply pass the certificate down just like normal, and everyone's system would accept it because it was officially signed.

    I'll leave the full ramifications of this process, and the problems with certificate based encryption up to others to discuss. I'll simply say this breaks the Internet, and how it was designed.

    If you want a more technical in-depth discussion, this was a recent topic on /. (http://ask.slashdot.org/story/12/06/16/223208/ask-slashdot-whats-your-take-on-https-snooping) including me describing my own run in with these systems.

  • May 16th, 2012 @ 8:31pm

    Well Siri sorta agrees

    Siri, Apple's newest twist on artificial intelligence did start directing people who asked "what is the best smartphone ever" to the Nokia Lumia 900 over the weekend. So, apparently even Siri knows that Apple can't compete any more!

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-18071342

  • May 3rd, 2012 @ 9:56am

    Next version of SOPA

    Perhaps the next version of SOPA can be used to block people mocking Chris Dodd's inane statements as well


    No, the next version of SOPA will simply make it illegal to contradict the official government version of history.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nineteen_Eighty-Four#Censorship

  • Apr 13th, 2012 @ 9:02am

    Repost? Duplicate? Mike's early onset of Alzheimer's?

    Ahm, isn't this a duplicate of a posting done on April 5th? Google confirms this was posted on April 5th, and links to today's story.

    I mean, don't get me wrong, I liked it the first time around. But re-posting it, is the Friday 13th equivalent of f'ing with those of us that haven't quite had enough caffeine yet today.

    Shane

  • Oct 14th, 2011 @ 2:58pm

    Photographers viewpoint

    From the viewpoint of a photographer, I'd think he'd pursue defamation of character, libel, and probably a few other civil items. The FBI certainly knew (or should have known) who is was, and although he could be considered a celebrity, they definitely knew the situation was false.

    This is no different than the National Inquirer publishing a false story. The only way they get away with it on a regular basis, is they buy the stories from people that tell them it's true. Once they know it's false, publishing it would be negligence under the Sullivan rule. (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/New_York_Times_Co._v._Sullivan)

  • Sep 20th, 2011 @ 10:48pm

    Where's all that water coming from?

    MPAA Shuffles The Deck Chairs


    Just like Facebook changing the layout...again?

  • Sep 8th, 2011 @ 7:19pm

    Yes I do this

    I do this day in, and day out. I'm doing it right now. I constantly refresh my news feeds, my Facebook stalker feed, and occasionally my LinkedIn feed all looking for little tidbits of data. Something, anything to give me hope that things are getting better. That somewhere, someplace someone has figured out a plan to straighten things out again.

    The worse things get, the worse news I find, the more intense I search. There's got to be a way out of this mess the world is coming to. Now if I could just find it.

  • Aug 23rd, 2011 @ 3:42pm

    Congress

    Where's the real patent reform, Congress?

    Where's the real Congress?

  • Aug 23rd, 2011 @ 2:14am

    Contents of the PDF file.

    The PDF file opened fine under Ubuntu's Document Viewer. That was the easy part. Reformatting for here, and getting it past the spam filter was a bit harder.

    Imagine there is the appropriate "http colon slash slash" in front of the tinyurl.


    "5MillionDollars1Terrabyte"FileList
    ContentsDowloadLink FileSizeValue
    AdobeFontCollectiontinyurl.com/3qa6.069GB20,000
    AdobeCreativeSuitePCtinyurl.com/3cs76GB2,600
    AdobeCreativeSuiteMAC tinyurl.com/3q2q6GB2,600
    AutoCAD2011PCtinyurl.com/4x4b2GB 3,600
    AutoCAD2011MACtinyurl.com/3osz2GB3,600
    Artlantis tinyurl.com/3ufc.5GB1,200
    AutodeskMotionBuildertinyurl.com/3kk81.6 GB3,500
    SoftImageFaceRobottinyurl.com/3gm8.5GB95,000
    AutoCADMAP3d tinyurl.com/3p531GB6,000
    AutoCADMegaPacktinyurl.com/3k47 80GB95,000
    AutodeskAutoCADtinyurl.com/42ca3GB1,000
    Rosetta StoneLanguagePacktinyurl.com/3zcw33GB15,000
    Completen64GameCollectiontinyurl.co m/3k337GB4,000
    FontCollectiontinyurl.com/3bnc21GB80,000
    N intendoDSRomCollectiontinyurl.com/3kep137GB145,000
    FictionBooks2003-2011tin yurl.com/3vnj133GB3,000,000
    GBA,GBC,SNES,NEOGEORomstinyurl.com/3ofk27GB10 ,000
    OspreyBookCollectiontinyurl.com/3e4a39GB180,000
    FictionLibrary tinyurl.com/3nfu23GB400,000
    ProgrammingBookCollectiontinyurl.com/3l3l18GB 18,000
    PCGames1979-2001tinyurl.com/3dvu130GB150,000
    NintendoDSRomCo llectiontinyurl.com/4ymc88GB100,000
    VideoGameCollectiontinyurl.com/442h 34GB30,000
    ArcadeGameCollectiontinyurl.com/3dox20GB37,000
    MusicAlbum Collectiontinyurl.com/3j96124GB46,000
    JavaProgrammingBookPacktinyurl.com/3 ku4.5GB3,000
    MATLABBookCollectiontinyurl.com/3glw1GB7,500
    Visu alBasicBookCollectiontinyurl.com/3hb3.5GB3,000
    KindleBookCollectiontinyur l.com/3pzh19,760
    ScienceTextBookCollectiontinyurl.com/3oh976GB500,00 0

    Tot al:1,016GB4,971,760


    Yea, the formatting still sucks, sorry. Best I can do.

  • Aug 23rd, 2011 @ 2:03am

    Contents of the PDF file.

    It opens up fine in Ubuntu's Document Viewer:


    "5MillionDollars1Terrabyte"
    Contents DowloadLinkFileSizeValue
    AdobeFontCollectionht tp://tinyurl.com/3qa6qzg.069GB20,000
    AdobeCreativeSuitePChttp://tinyurl.com/3 cs7njd6GB2,600
    AdobeCreativeSuiteMAChttp://tinyurl.com/3q2qeek6GB 2,600
    AutoCAD2011PChttp://tinyurl.com/4x4b9qj2GB3,600
    AutoCA D2011MAChttp://tinyurl.com/3oszrdo2GB3,600
    Artlantis http://tinyurl.com/3ufc292.5GB1,200
    AutodeskMotionBuilderhttp://tin yurl.com/3kk85d41.6GB3,500
    SoftImageFaceRobothttp://tinyurl.com/3gm8w2m .5GB95,000
    AutoCADMAP3dhttp://tinyurl.com/3p53sgp1GB6,0 00
    AutoCADMegaPackhttp://tinyurl.com/3k47a6n80GB95,000
    AutodeskAutoC ADhttp://tinyurl.com/42camov3GB1,000
    RosettaStoneLanguagePack http://tinyurl.com/3zcwxog33GB15,000
    Completen64GameCollectionhttp://tinyurl.com /3k33rju7GB4,000
    FontCollectionhttp://tinyurl.com/3bnc28e21GB 80,000
    NintendoDSRomCollectionhttp://tinyurl.com/3kepkj4137GB145,000
    Fict ionBooks2003-2011http://tinyurl.com/3vnjygc133GB3,000,000
    GBA,GBC,SNES,NEOGEORo mshttp://tinyurl.com/3ofkl8e27GB10,000
    OspreyBookCollectionhttp://t inyurl.com/3e4asmo39GB180,000
    FictionLibraryhttp://tinyurl.com/3nfuyna 23GB400,000
    ProgrammingBookCollectionhttp://tinyurl.com/3l3lps418GB18 ,000
    PCGames1979-2001http://tinyurl.com/3dvu5ym130GB150,000
    NintendoDS RomCollectionhttp://tinyurl.com/4ymct2388GB100,000
    VideoGameCollection http://tinyurl.com/442haqa34GB30,000
    ArcadeGameCollectionhttp://tinyurl.c om/3dox4q320GB37,000
    MusicAlbumCollectionhttp://tinyurl.com/3j96nve124 GB46,000
    JavaProgrammingBookPackhttp://tinyurl.com/3ku4jk9.5GB3,000
    MA TLABBookCollectionhttp://tinyurl.com/3glws5w1GB7,500
    VisualBasicBookCo llectionhttp://tinyurl.com/3hb3a5o.5GB3,000
    KindleBookCollectionhttp:/ /tinyurl.com/3pzhk2k19,760
    ScienceTextBookCollectionhttp://tinyurl.com/3oh9s j576GB500,000

    Total:1,016GB4,971,760


    Sorry about the formatting, I tried to align it from the PDF the best I could.

  • Jul 29th, 2011 @ 8:14pm

    Trolling

    I'm beginning to honestly think that the US Court system is simply trolling.

  • Jul 25th, 2011 @ 9:34pm

    History

    As soon as all the corrections which happened to be necessary in any particular number of The Times had been assembled and collated, that number would be reprinted, the original copy destroyed, and the corrected copy placed on the files in its stead. This process of continuous alteration was applied not only to newspapers, but to books, periodicals, pamphlets, posters, leaflets, films, sound-tracks, cartoons, photographs to every kind of literature or documentation which might conceivably hold any political or ideological significance. Day by day and almost minute by minute the past was brought up to date. In this way every prediction made by the Party could be shown by documentary evidence to have been correct, nor was any item of news, or any expression of opinion, which conflicted with the needs of the moment, ever allowed to remain on record. All history was a palimpsest, scraped clean and reinscribed exactly as often as was necessary. In no case would it have been possible, once the deed was done, to prove that any falsification had taken place.
    --George Orwell, "1984"


    That reminds me. I should donate some money to the Internet Archive. (http://www.archive.org/donate/)

  • Jul 8th, 2011 @ 3:40pm

    Who is on the plane doesn't necessarily solve the problem either

    I understand that the rest of the world deals with airport/airplane security by concentrating on "who is flying" instead of "what they bring on-board." However, in the U.S. that probably won't work as effectively. Specifically because, it will still be a government ran agency making the determination.

    For example, would you agree to a credit check before you boarded a plane? The first time it appears that someone who was in "massive debt" (ie: most everyone in America) took payment to bring something on a flight, it will happen. Are you unemployed, and flying to a job interview somewhere? Sorry about you luck, you're now a security risk!

    How about your driving record? Get a speeding ticket on the way to the airport? Sorry, you're reckless and distracted. You must be a terrorist!

    Taxes? Are you about to be audited? What do you have to live for? You must be a terrorist!

    How about medical records? Just diagnosed with a fatal condition, and want to spend your remaining days with family? What do you have to live for? You must be a terrorist!

    No, "who" over "what" doesn't solve the problem, as long as the deranged puppet masters of this security theatre are still making the rules.

    Government has to solve the problem, that's what government is there for. However, the mentality and approach used to determine who is a threat has to change. Ignoring humanity, and liberty to appease the paranoid will achieve nothing.

    Shane

  • Jun 21st, 2011 @ 5:01pm

    Two drink minimum

    It's interesting. This may eliminate the "two drink minimum" imposed by many clubs, and entertainment establishments.

    Then again, it might impose a "two drink maximum" at many places.

    In the long run, it will probably just create another mandatory insurance situation. You won't be able to have a liquor license in NJ without carrying insurance for when someone gets drunk.

  • Jun 21st, 2011 @ 11:27am

    One of two things

    My prediction is that one of two things is about to happen. One, Universal is about to roll out an "authenticate your website" program where for a price you can have the privileged of running their advertisements.

    Or, they are about to say "Oops! We thought that list was the 'approved list' not the 'disapproved list'," and they'll promptly revert the list for the time being (ie: until the bad press dies down).

  • Jun 20th, 2011 @ 10:54pm

    (untitled comment)

    {sigh}

    Trolls and AC's aside, it was in vogue for many states to implement a three tier system after the end of strict Prohibition. 1) Manufacturer 2) Distributor 3) Retailer

    Generally speaking, only in limited circumstances can a those roles blur together. For example, micro-breweries that manufacture, and sell on site, are often (but not always) exempt from the three tier setup. Yes, in some states micro-breweries are required to ship their product to a distributor, get a Federal Tax Stamp, and have it shipped right back to them. As many have said, welcome to the Alcohol Laws in the US.

    I make mention of the end of "Strict Prohibition" because in many ways Prohibition has not ended. The US Government did not make Alcohol legal in the same sense that it was legal before Prohibition. Instead, the restrictions on it were loosened, and it was made legal in certain circumstances. Very controlled, and heavily taxed circumstances.

    All that being said, many states are considering removing the mandatory three tier system (of course the distributors are fighting this tooth and nail), as it is often viewed as a unnecessarily contrived setup who's functionality has come to pass. (sarcasm) It's nice to know that Wisconsin is stepping up to the early 20th century. (/sarcasm)

    And if you think the brewing of beer is bad, you should see the laws surrounding the distillation of liquor.

  • Jun 10th, 2011 @ 3:41pm

    Lawsuit

    Something I don't understand, is why someone hasn't brought a lawsuit against anybody who's name is very obviously associated with the seizures. I understand that the parties that are currently associated with the actions, might not be the government entity initiating the action. However, if you sue one entity I would think that their "defense" would be "it's not us, we're just doing this on behalf of so-and-so." THEN you they could go after the "real" department initiating things.

    The arguments I've heard so far about them not being able to bring legal action because they "don't know who they're suing," doesn't seem to hold water. Someone's name is on these documents, pick a name and start filing action.

    Obviously I'm not a lawyer (and I honestly would love someone with a legal background to explain this to me), but from how I understand the law, the system was setup to prohibit prosecutors from bringing action you couldn't fight. Several of these domains affected have large amounts of $$ and lawyers ready to do it. Why are they just sitting around hoping for the justice department to "allow them" to fight the seizures?

  • May 24th, 2011 @ 7:24pm

    VeriSign

    I have to wonder if it will come down to suing VeriSign for illegally reassigning the domains from their appropriate owners to the US Government. That would put pressure on VeriSign to put pressure on ICE to produce the authoritative party for the seizures, would it not?

    Suing VeriSign would be a civil lawsuit, thus possibly open to a class action status by all of the effected domain holders.

    No I don't think VeriSign is guilty here. They just did what the court ordered them to do. However, they could be used as leverage to get to the real heart of the matter.

More comments from Shane C >>