Constitutional Scholar Who Taught Obama Comes Out Against Bradley Manning Trial

from the as-he-should dept

As the Bradley Manning trial officially kicks off today, it's interesting to see famed Constitutional scholar and Harvard professor Laurence Tribe speak out against the case. As The Guardian notes, Tribe taught Constitutional Law to President Obama when he was in law school.
Laurence Tribe, a Harvard professor who is considered to be the foremost liberal authority on constitutional law in the US and who taught the subject to President Barack Obama, told the Guardian that the charge could set a worrying precedent. He said: "Charging any individual with the extremely grave offense of 'aiding the enemy' on the basis of nothing beyond the fact that the individual posted leaked information on the web and thereby 'knowingly gave intelligence information' to whoever could gain access to it there, does indeed seem to break dangerous new ground."

Tribe, who advised the department of justice in Obama's first term, added that the trial could have "far-reaching consequences for chilling freedom of speech and rendering the internet a hazardous environment, well beyond any demonstrable national security interest."
I know that some people have pre-convicted Manning, but the charges here are simply crazy. He's already pled guilty to certain charges, but this trial focuses on whether or not he was "aiding the enemy," which would require to show that he did this knowing that it would help Al-Qaida and [classified enemy]. The supposed "proof" of this is going to be the fact that Osama bin Laden apparently had Wikileaks documents in his compound in Pakistan. But that's ridiculous. Under that theory, anyone reporting information that terrorists found useful would be guilty of violating the Espionage Act and could face the death penalty. As others in the article note, this would create a tremendous chill on investigative reporting.


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  1.  
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    That One Guy (profile), Jun 3rd, 2013 @ 12:45pm

    'As others in the article note, this would create a tremendous chill on investigative reporting.'

    As the government would be sure to say(though never publicly), 'That's a feature, not a bug'.

     

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    weneedhelp (profile), Jun 3rd, 2013 @ 2:05pm

    ARRRRRGGGGHHHHHH

    Do we as IT PPL still believe he had thumb drives and Wikileaks papers strewn about his place? Really? Are we to believe the 911 mastermind, and leader of the mighty alCIAda is that technologically clueless? Bin Laden didn't have whole disk encryption?
    -
    The desired outcome IS to create a tremendous chill on investigative reporting, and says loud and clear to any normal citizen, dont F with big brother or you'll get your ass kicked.
    -
    Barry knows exactly what he is doing.

     

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    pixelpusher220 (profile), Jun 3rd, 2013 @ 2:13pm

    "considered to be the foremost liberal authority on constitutional law"

    I guess I'm happy for his point of view to be put out there, but it seems like somewhat a conflict of interest to be the foremost authority and be specifically partisan.

    (and I'm extremely liberal myself)

     

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  4.  
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    Atkray (profile), Jun 3rd, 2013 @ 2:19pm

    Re:

    I expect that when Manning gets the firing squad we'll see Obama on an aircraft carrier with a big banner that says Mission Accomplished.

     

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    Anonymous Coward, Jun 3rd, 2013 @ 2:27pm

    So posting information (that should not have been classified in the first place) to the internet gets you an "aiding the enemy" charge but giving $$$ and weapons directly to terrorists in Syria is just fine?

    Some heads need to roll...

    I wonder when people will stop believeing the lies they are told every day by these supposed "leaders."

    We need to find a way to awaken the proles and end this facist tyranny that is wrapped in a sugar coated porn mag.

     

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    monkey with attitude, Jun 3rd, 2013 @ 2:40pm

    Re:

    You know the nice thing is (as i greatly dislike labels for this stuff, but not a liberal) this gives a common point for all sides to find some place to agree.

    Just a different view point, but on the same grounds, and if different view points can find a middle ground there is some hope left to pull the power from those that are only using it to prop themselves up.

     

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    weneedhelp (profile), Jun 3rd, 2013 @ 2:58pm

    Re: Re:

    I smell a Photoshop project in the works.

     

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  8. This comment has been flagged by the community. Click here to show it
     
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    Anonymous Coward, Jun 3rd, 2013 @ 2:59pm

    I remember when Pirate Mike attacked Prof. Tribe because he thought SOPA/PROTECT IP didn't violate the First Amendment. What happened to all those personal attacks, Mikey? I thought this guy was an idiot since he couldn't match up to your super-awesome understanding of the First Amendment. LOL! ROFLMAO! Classic. Mikey thought he understood the doctrine better than Prof. Tribe. That was awesome!

     

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  9.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Jun 3rd, 2013 @ 3:00pm

    Manning is going to be convicted, not on evidence and not because he did anything like listed in the charges posted against him but because there are those that want him convicted. the hope, in my opinion, is to try to scare the living shit of everyone! no one is then supposed to tell the world about all the atrocities the USA always get accused of and often get found out as having done, usually to innocent civilians during what are supposedly times of war! the majority of the charges and evidence is as trumped up as the charges and evidence used by the entertainment industries in file sharing cases. the difference here being that this poor fucker will go to prison for life and get both rogered and beaten on an almost daily basis! i hope whoever it is that's responsible for the appalling way he has/is being treated is pleased with him/herself and sleeps soundly. whether it is the President or one of his so-called trusted supporters in charge of whichever security organisation behind it all, if/when the truth comes out, i hope they can still be held accountable! how can anyone condone this treatment of someone for making the world aware of the truth? had it been an incident that happened in somewhere like Iran or N.Korea, the papers would be full of condemnation! what a double standard world we live in. what a double standard set of values we live by. both good and bad at the same time, as long as we can use them in the way we want, when we want!

     

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  10.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Jun 3rd, 2013 @ 3:01pm

    Re:

    It's almost like rational people (hint: you are not one) can both agree and disagree with different positions other people take.

    This is amazing news!

     

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    Crashoverride (profile), Jun 3rd, 2013 @ 3:06pm

    I also heard they found a Google Map printout which showed where in New York the Twin Towers where.... Which begs the obvious question where does the line of something that Bin Laden reads while sitting on the toilet end and actually aiding him/terrorists begin???

     

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    Brent Ashley (profile), Jun 3rd, 2013 @ 3:13pm

    Comforting

    Time to indict the publishers of Bin Laden's extensive bookshelf full of "Chicken Soup for the Soul" books.

     

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  13.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Jun 3rd, 2013 @ 3:19pm

    Re:

    Politicians don't have standards, so they can't be accused of having double standards.

     

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  14.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Jun 3rd, 2013 @ 3:19pm

    Is it wrong...

    That my first reaction was "ooh BURN" just at the title?

     

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    Anonymous, Jun 3rd, 2013 @ 3:29pm

    Re:

    "Constitutional law" has become a contradiction.

     

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  16.  
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    That Anonymous Coward (profile), Jun 3rd, 2013 @ 3:48pm

    Re:

    because the DOJ grabbing reporters information for kicks wasn't enough of a message.

     

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    Mike Masnick (profile), Jun 3rd, 2013 @ 3:53pm

    Re:

    I remember when Pirate Mike attacked Prof. Tribe because he thought SOPA/PROTECT IP didn't violate the First Amendment. What happened to all those personal attacks, Mikey? I thought this guy was an idiot since he couldn't match up to your super-awesome understanding of the First Amendment. LOL! ROFLMAO! Classic. Mikey thought he understood the doctrine better than Prof. Tribe. That was awesome!

    http://www.techdirt.com/articles/20111208/15442917016/constitutional-scholars-explain-wh y-sopa-protect-ip-do-not-pass-first-amendment-scrutiny.shtml

    You're in such a blind rush to attack me that you're completely and totally wrong. Again.

    Laurence Tribe explained why SOPA violated the First Amendment, and we agreed with him.

    Please point us to where he said otherwise and where we issued "personal attacks" on him?

    Thanks.

     

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  18.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Jun 3rd, 2013 @ 4:45pm

    with Attorney General Eric Holder attacks on the press lately could the "classified enemy" be the press.

     

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  19.  
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    Rekrul, Jun 3rd, 2013 @ 5:05pm

    As The Guardian notes, Tribe taught Constitutional Law to President Obama when he was in law school.

    Obviously Obama slept through that class...

     

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  20.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Jun 3rd, 2013 @ 5:09pm

    As the only person on the courts martial is the judge which had to be at the request of Manning. I believe what comes out of the proceedings will if he is found guilty require remediation by the Supreme Court.

     

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    Anonymous Coward, Jun 3rd, 2013 @ 5:19pm

    As the only person on the courts martial is the judge which had to be at the request of Manning. I believe what comes out of the proceedings will if he is found guilty require remediation by the Supreme Court.

    Strike That No Supreme Court Review, the only thing that can save him is a pardon from a president.

     

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  22.  
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    Rex Rollman, Jun 3rd, 2013 @ 5:33pm

    Speaking as an ex-military member, I find Manning detestable and I believe he should be convicted. That said, I find the government's treatment of Manning since his arrest equally wrong.

     

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  23.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Jun 3rd, 2013 @ 5:46pm

    Re:

    Tribe is one of the foremost authorities on Constitutional law, period. Forget his politics or anything like that: the man is a walking, talking encyclopedia AND he understands it at a level that eludes even most of his peers.

    Think of him as the equivalent of Michael Jordan in his prime: yeah, others can play the game, but NOBODY can play it like this guy.

     

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  24.  
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    ScytheNoire, Jun 3rd, 2013 @ 6:41pm

    Give Back the Nobel Peace Prize

    Obama should give back the Nobel Peace Prize and apologize to everyone for having lied and made people believe he was something he is not.

     

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  25.  
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    horse with no name, Jun 3rd, 2013 @ 6:45pm

    In related news

    ... the sky is blue. In all of that, you will always be able to find one professor or one "educated" type who will say they are against something.

    Remember, it's 4 out 5 dentists, not all of them. There is always 1 that gets it wrong!

     

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  26.  
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    CapnObvious, Jun 3rd, 2013 @ 6:53pm

    Damning with faint praise

    The guy who taught Obama the constitution is your appeal to authority? Isn't that like talking your way out of a DUI by quoting the idiot at the DMV who approved Lindsay Lohan for a license?

     

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  27.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Jun 3rd, 2013 @ 6:53pm

    Re:

    I remember when Superman challenged FDR to a race around the world. FDR beat him by a furlong, or so the comic books would have you believe. The truth lies somewhere in between.

     

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  28.  
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    nasch (profile), Jun 3rd, 2013 @ 6:54pm

    Re: ARRRRRGGGGHHHHHH

    Are we to believe the 911 mastermind, and leader of the mighty alCIAda is that technologically clueless? Bin Laden didn't have whole disk encryption?

    Why are you sure he had whole disk encryption? Obviously he was very careful, but perhaps he figured if he was found he didn't really care what happened to his information since he would be a dead man anyway.

     

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  29.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Jun 3rd, 2013 @ 7:03pm

    I know that some people have pre-convicted Manning, but the charges here are simply crazy. He's already pled guilty to certain charges

    No, we have not pre-convicted him, we are simply agreeing to the self conviction from Manning.

    He's already pled guilty to certain charges

    That's the bottom line, we agree with Manning's assessment of his guilt.

    it's also not clear from what you have posted that Tribe has actually come out against it.

    Tribe is also clearly wrong about "breaking new ground" perhaps he good at constitution law, but not so hot on history.

    None of this is "new ground".

     

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  30.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Jun 3rd, 2013 @ 7:06pm

    Re: Re: ARRRRRGGGGHHHHHH

    from the reports of the people who conducted the raid, they said something like "he had hard drives everywhere, later we found none of it was encrypted"

     

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  31.  
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    Mike Masnick (profile), Jun 3rd, 2013 @ 7:18pm

    Re:

    None of this is "new ground".


    Actually it is. Very much. These kinds of charges, against this kind of action? Yes. If you knew your history you would know that it is absolutely extremely new ground.

     

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  32.  
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    Mike Masnick (profile), Jun 3rd, 2013 @ 7:20pm

    Re: Damning with faint praise

    The guy who taught Obama the constitution is your appeal to authority? Isn't that like talking your way out of a DUI by quoting the idiot at the DMV who approved Lindsay Lohan for a license?

    The guy is widely considered one of, if not the, best constitutional scholars around. You don't have to agree with everything he said, but just because he has a poor student, doesn't mean he's off-base.

     

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  33.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Jun 3rd, 2013 @ 8:41pm

    Re: In related news

    ""There is always 1 that gets it wrong!""

    If there is 1 that gets it wrong then that makes them in the minority and as you are in the minority on here in your opinion then that makes you opinion and comment in the wrong.

     

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  34.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Jun 3rd, 2013 @ 9:00pm

    But that's ridiculous. Under that theory, anyone reporting information that terrorists found useful would be guilty of violating the Espionage Act and could face the death penalty. As others in the article note, this would create a tremendous chill on investigative reporting.

    No. The person initially publicizing it on the internet for everyone to see and redistribute is guilty of violating the Espionage Act. The act of reporting on or reprinting what has already been globally distributed is a different matter entirely.

     

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  35.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Jun 3rd, 2013 @ 9:08pm

    Re: Re:

    Actually it was renown First Amendment scholar (and former Solicitor General) Floyd Abrams who Mike maintained "didn't know what he was talking about". Which, given Abrams celebrated career of First Amendment cases before the Supreme Court; is even more laughable than denigrating Tribe.

     

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  36.  
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    Karl (profile), Jun 3rd, 2013 @ 11:19pm

    Re: Re: Re:

    Actually it was renown First Amendment scholar (and former Solicitor General) Floyd Abrams who Mike maintained "didn't know what he was talking about".

    I looked at the Techdirt story about Abrams' SOPA analysis, and nowhere in there does he say that Abrams "didn't know what he was talking about."

    On the other hand, he does point this out:
    the MPAA is a client of Abrams, as are various other Hollywood trade groups. He didn't write the letter on his own behalf, but was paid by these groups to write the letter. As such, he's speaking as a paid advocate for them, not as an objective independent observer.

    After that, Mike went into a great amount of detail, showing the lack of merits of Abrams' position. No part of the article involved personal attacks, or the implication that Abrams "didn't know what he was talking about."

    If anyone was saying that Abrams "didn't know what he was talking about," it was Lawrence Tribe, Constitutional scholar, in the article that Mike linked to.

    So, the original A.C. (who is obviously Average Joe) not only got the whole thing completely wrong - but he accused Mike of doing precisely the thing that he, himself, did. After all, he is the one who called any First Amendment concerns about SOPA "FUD," and who actually implied that Tribe was shilling for Google.

    So, let's make his comment accurate:
    I remember when Average Joe attacked Prof. Tribe because he [Tribe] thought SOPA/PROTECT IP violated the First Amendment. What happened to all those personal attacks, Joey? I thought this guy was an idiot since he couldn't match up to your super-awesome understanding of the First Amendment. LOL! ROFLMAO! Classic. Joey thought he understood the doctrine better than Prof. Tribe. That was awesome!

     

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  37.  
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    Captain Obvious, Jun 3rd, 2013 @ 11:23pm

    Re: Re: Damning with faint praise

    Having a poor student is one thing... PASSING said student anyway with a grade high enough for him to be taken seriously as a teacher, is another matter entirely. I don't have to agree nor disagree with ANYthing as that would be entirely beside the point of my above simple musing. I, for one, have never been much impressed with either of them, but I'm glad to see we've progressed from argumentum ad verecundium to ad populum. What's next on the list of fallacies?

     

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  38.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Jun 3rd, 2013 @ 11:50pm

    the files were already leaked before Manning

    With over 200.000 soldiers having access to these files, every intelligence service round the world and their governments had already bought a copy. Its the fact that the Public got to see them that is the problem.

     

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  39.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Jun 3rd, 2013 @ 11:58pm

    Re:

    So you support what your Government was doing?

    Do you believe that what they were doing should have been made public or do you think that the Government should be un-accountable for their actions?

     

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  40.  
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    JMT (profile), Jun 4th, 2013 @ 3:52am

    Re:

    Where are all of your examples proving this is not new ground? You sound terribly sure of yourself so it should be easy to back up your claim..

     

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    The Real Michael, Jun 4th, 2013 @ 4:31am

    Re: the files were already leaked before Manning

    Naturally, because they don't want their actions being exposed to the American public, hence why they need to create a chilling effect by making an example out of Manning. All this is going to do is ensure that whistleblowers act anonymously, that's all.

     

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  42.  
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    btrussell (profile), Jun 4th, 2013 @ 6:01am

    Re: In related news

    When 4 out of 5 Surgeons prefer Camels, I'll side with the one who prefers women.

     

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  43.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Jun 4th, 2013 @ 6:05am

    When did Manning become an investigative reporter?

    While I don't particularly like the way Bradley Manning has been treated, I think that there's a basis for the charges against him. Whether what he did constitutes "aiding the enemy" is the question that is before the judge. I don't know the charges for which he has already plead guilty, so perhaps the rest of my thoughts on this are moot (at least in terms of his particular situation).

    First, his role as an active duty member of the military, did not somehow qualify him as an investigative reporter. Rather, while in that role, he was expected to follow certain protocols regarding the dissemination of information. And while WikiLeaks may be considered a form of journalism, there is no basis, that I am aware of, for treating Bradley Manning as a reporter for that organization.

    Second, there are mechanisms within the military and the government for exposing the bad things that are done. They don't always work the way we would like, but they are there as a means to at least make the attempt. Maybe Bradley Manning tried going down those paths first, although I don't recall seeing any indication that he did so. Instead, it seems that the approach he took in "whistleblowing" was to decide on his own what documents should be handed over to an outside organization. In that, he became judge, jury and executor of the entire affair.

    To put it in a different perspective...
    Let's say that some person, in your inner circle, with whom you've entrusted a secret about yourself. Maybe the secret isn't something that will absolutely cause you to be jailed, but it will probably keep you from getting any job that you want to have. Would it be right for that person to decide that your secret should be exposed to the world? Should that person be held responsible for telling your secret to the world? Or should they be held up as an example of good investigative reporting?

     

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  44.  
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    Ron, Jun 4th, 2013 @ 9:13am

    Re: Re:

    Don't let this dip shit get to you, Mike. He is like the only asshole in the comedy club that heckles the comedians because he thinks he is more funny than they are. We all know he is a tool and he looks more dumb when you don't respond to his stupidity.

     

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    AJS (profile), Jun 4th, 2013 @ 11:10am

    What about the other things found in Bin Laden's compound?

    Also found, according to Wikipedia, in Bin Laden’s compound:
    …Cheap foam mattresses, central heating, old televisions, a whiteboard, markers, textbooks, dates, nuts, eggs, olive oil, rabbits, 100 chickens, a cow, and medicines…
    Death to bedding manufacturers, HVAC contractors, electronics stores, school suppliers, textbook publishers, grocers, farmers, and pharmaceutical companies!

     

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  46.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Jun 4th, 2013 @ 12:01pm

    Re: When did Manning become an investigative reporter?

    AC @ Jun 4th, 2013, 6:05 AM:

    While there seems to be a lot of rhetoric supporting Manning, yours is the first comment addressing some of the downsides of what Manning did, and I believe you are on point with your comments.

    Some things Manning did trouble me significantly. I have read that Manning released something on the order of 700,000 classified documents to Wikileaks, and supposedly those documents could not cause harm to the U.S. So, Private Manning reviewed all 700,000 documents and decided all on his own that none of these documents would compromise any field operations or put any soldiers at risk? Private Manning reviewed those documents in view of all other intelligence and considered whether any of these documents could be combined with other intelligence to put soldiers into harm's way? If Manning took these actions, I am impressed and in awe. Clearly Private Manning is a genius and an intelligence expert ready to be inducted into the highest tiers of an intelligence organization, if he could keep his mouth shut.

    Manning also claimed that his purpose was to spark a debate about how Iraqi citizens were being treated. I wonder that 700,000 documents cover poor and possibly illegal treatment of Iraqi people. I guess someone in the government has way too much time on their hands if they can document treatment of Iraqi citizens in 700,000 documents. Of course, if many of the documents, perhaps the vast majority, do not cover treatment of Iraqi citizens, then maybe Manning was just ignoring the oath he took to safeguard classified data for his own purposes.

    Documents are generally classifed because they include operational information, which puts people into danger and if provided to an enemy are direct aid to an enemy, because they include information that can provide a link to an information source, which is direct aid to an enemy, or because they include capabilities, such as number of men, when and where they are going, etc., which would also be direct aid to an enemy. I struggle to believe that Private Manning was so skillful that he was able to leak only those documents that did not fall into those categories.

    Private Manning's heart may have been in the right place, but he went about it in the wrong way. Releasing 700,000 classified documents seems to me much like shooting a mouse with a machine gun. I have to wonder why anyone would do anything so ridiculous, unless they were fundamentally irresponsible or just did not know what they were doing. It seems to me that Manning could have released specific documents documenting the abuses of Iraqi citizens. Even more effective would have been documents documenting the abuse that appear to have been classified ONLY because of the documented abuse.

    I was in the military some time ago. I took my oath to safeguard classified documents and equipment seriously. I recognized that leaks of certain information could, and did, lead to intelligence sources being discovered and murdered. I did sometimes wonder why certain documents were classified, and probably many documents were classified needlessly, but without perfect knowledge, and I certainly did not have perfect knowledge, I was not in a position to challenge the classifying authority. I do not believe Private Manning was in such a position either.

     

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    nasch (profile), Jun 4th, 2013 @ 6:50pm

    Re: Re: When did Manning become an investigative reporter?

    Documents are generally classifed because they include operational information, which puts people into danger

    IIRC one of the things we learned here is that they are often classified to avoid embarrassment.

     

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  48.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Jun 4th, 2013 @ 9:48pm

    Re: Re: Re: When did Manning become an investigative reporter?

    I have seen hundreds of classified documents, all of which were classified either because of the nature of the classified material, or the source of the classified material. Out of all of those documents, I have yet to see even one where the classification was made to avoid embarrassment. However, once you provide an example, I will be convinced.

     

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  49.  
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    Niall (profile), Jun 5th, 2013 @ 6:04am

    Re:

    Convicted of what? Breaking security is one thing - but this prosecution is so far beyond that it's not funny.

    That's a bit like saying an army guy stole another army guy's gun, and now he deserves life imprisonment or the death sentence, as that 'helped the enemy'.

     

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    Anonymous Coward, Jun 5th, 2013 @ 8:27am

    Re: Re:

    Actually, depending on the circumstances, it is more like telling a gang that one of its members is a police informant, and they murder the person. He does deserve life imprisonment if any of the 700k documents he released have endangered people.

     

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  51.  
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    nasch (profile), Jun 5th, 2013 @ 10:47am

    Re: Re: Re: Re: When did Manning become an investigative reporter?

    Out of all of those documents, I have yet to see even one where the classification was made to avoid embarrassment. However, once you provide an example, I will be convinced.

    http://www.presstv.com/detail/228484.html
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Contents_of_th e_United_States_diplomatic_cables_leak_%28analysis_of_individual_leaders%29

    "However, other governments' reactions were considerably milder concerning the possible impacts of the leaks. According to US Defense Secretary Robert Gates the leaks were embarrassing but he estimated that they would only have "modest" consequences for US foreign policy"

    http://www.ifla.org/publications/what-is-the-effect-of-wikileaks-for-freedom-of-informati on

    'As for the diplomatic cables, Manning said that the more he read them, the more he came to the conclusion that the cables should be made public. He said he didn’t believe that it would damage the United States, but that it might be embarrassing, “since they represented very honest opinions and statements behind the backs of other nations and organizations.”'

    http://www.theepochtimes.com/n3/88402-why-bradley-manning-leaked-classified-docu ments-to-wikileaks/

    I'm not going to try to go through the hundreds of thousands of documents to pick one out, but it certainly seems at a bare minimum fishy to me, and at worst completely corrupt. Also, given the millions and millions of classified documents that exist, your viewing of a non-random selection of a few hundred of them is not statistically meaningful. There could easily be huge numbers of inappropriately classified documents without you having seen any of them.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  52.  
    identicon
    Anonymous Coward, Jun 5th, 2013 @ 11:33am

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: When did Manning become an investigative reporter?

    nasch:

    So, you have proven beyond question that Manning's supposed motivation, the release of documents regarding the treatment of Iraqi citizens, was clearly a blatant lie. I appreciate you clearing that up.

    Behind the scenes analysis of individuals is nearly always classified. Admittedly, the reason for the classification is that it is a summary of informed opinions of other leaders, and perhaps even domestic leaders, but everyone does exactly the same thing. What people would rather not do is have that summary out there for a multitude of reasons. I doubt there was all that much embarrassment over the analysis of the the various foreign leaders (more stuff that Manning revealed that directly related to the harsh treatment of Iraqi citizens), because all governments and many corporations do the same thing. All those documents are classified because while such analyses exist, it is considered gauche to reveal them.

    As for my viewing of "non-random" classified documents, I was once tasked to perform an analysis, and as part of that task I perused hundreds of document randomly (pre-computer days) to determine the scope of knowledge available. Of course, my analysis was technical rather than diplomatic, so none of the stuff you linked to would have been available to me.

    Thus far, I have seen nothing that I would describe as corrupt, except Manning's actions in violating a contract and an oath. I guess Manning does not hold his word in very high esteem.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  53.  
    icon
    Gwiz (profile), Jun 5th, 2013 @ 3:41pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: When did Manning become an investigative reporter?

    ...except Manning's actions in violating a contract and an oath.



    Isn't the foremost part of the military oath to "support and defend the Constitution of the United States against all enemies, foreign and domestic; that I will bear true faith and allegiance to the same"?

    I would argue that section takes precedence over the rest of the oath due to it's placement. Therefore, if the action was founded in preserving the rights protected by the Constitution, even violating the UCMJ wouldn't break that oath.

    Not saying that is the case here. Just saying.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  54.  
    identicon
    Anonymous Coward, Jun 5th, 2013 @ 6:35pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: When did Manning become an investigative reporter?

    Yes, IF Manning could prove that his actions were taken to "support and defend the Constitution," then he may have an argument that his actions were justified. However, in order for that to be the case, Manning would have to prove that all 700,000 documents supported that position. Conversely, if even one document compromised fellow soldiers or did not support that position, then the argument fails.

    My guess: Manning was not selective in what he released, and while some of the documents might support that position, many will not.

    We also need to remember that he has already pled guilty to charges that could land him in prison 20 years or more, so that part is a done deal. Among the charges to which he pled guilty are those which would have bolstered his argument that he released the documents to "support and defend the constitution." Since he has already essentially given up that position with his guilty plea, I think the "support and defend" argument is pretty much a dead end.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  55.  
    identicon
    Anonymous Coward, Jun 6th, 2013 @ 7:01am

    Re: Re:

    You're in such a blind rush to attack me that you're completely and totally wrong. Again.

    Laurence Tribe explained why SOPA violated the First Amendment, and we agreed with him.


    I stand corrected. I was thinking of Abrams. See, it's simple to admit a mistake.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]


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