CISPA Passes The House, As 288 Representatives Don't Want To Protect Your Privacy

from the all-the-others-are-just-14-year-olds-in-their-basement dept

This is not wholly surprising, but after some debate and some half-hearted attempts at pretending they care about the public's privacy rights, the House has passed CISPA, 288 votes against 127. The vote breakdown did not go fully along party lines, though it was clearly Republican driven. 196 Republicans voted for it, while just 29 voted against it (despite numerous conservative groups coming out against the bill). The Democrats split down the middle. 92 Dems voted for it and 98 against. If you compare this to last year, it looks like a lot more Democrats went from opposing to being in favor of trampling your privacy rights. Last year, 140 Dems voted against CISPA and only 42 for it. Either way, this seems like a pretty bi-partisan decision to shaft the American public on their privacy rights. That said, there is still the threat of a Presidential veto (though, with the vote today, the House is close to being able to override a veto). The bigger question is now the Senate, which couldn't agree on a cybersecurity bill last year, and has shown no signs of improvement this year. If you want to protect your privacy, it's time to focus on the Senate, and make sure they know not to pass a privacy-destroying bill like CISPA.


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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 18th, 2013 @ 10:28am

    That's it, FUD Boy! Congress hates our privacy! They're all dishonest douchebags, just like you!

     

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    Zakida Paul (profile), Apr 18th, 2013 @ 10:30am

    Looks like the President may have to put his money where his mouth is.

     

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      Anonymous Coward, Apr 19th, 2013 @ 5:06am

      Re:

      "Looks like the President may have to put his money where his mouth is."

      That would be preferable to the President putting his mouth where his money is, which is usually the case in this administration.

       

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    AWarnock, Apr 18th, 2013 @ 10:32am

    And I was more than a little miffed to find that the representative for my district voted for this.

     

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      E. Zachary Knight (profile), Apr 18th, 2013 @ 11:38am

      Re:

      Really? My Representative has a long and deep history of voting for crap like this yet I still can't get him voted out of office.

       

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    Rex Rollman, Apr 18th, 2013 @ 10:44am

    Republicans: they care about you before you are born, but after that, they don't give a fuck.

     

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    AC Unknown, Apr 18th, 2013 @ 10:44am

    We can only hope that this travesty of a bill is stopped dead in its tracks in the Senate. History is repeating itself.

     

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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 18th, 2013 @ 10:47am

    288 of 'em. Every single one hates our privacy. There is no other explanation. Anyone who disagrees with Mike's personal view about CISPA hates our privacy. There is no middle ground! Either you agree with Mike or you hate America! Yeah!

     

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      silverscarcat (profile), Apr 18th, 2013 @ 10:49am

      Re:

      Oh, do be quiet.

      It's better to remain quiet and thought a fool than open your mouth and remove all doubt after all.

       

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      Anonymous Coward, Apr 18th, 2013 @ 12:15pm

      Re:

      No not all 288 of them hate privacy. Some have been bought and paid for. Others do not understand what they are doing, a good number are probably old, a few years from death, and just don't care. Finally, at least a couple probably do hate privacy.

      None of them have any business running a country.

       

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        Anonymous Coward, Apr 18th, 2013 @ 12:39pm

        Re: Re:

        Old people in the pocket of the special interests! All of 'em! Only Mike Masnick represents truth! Sure, he didn't launch the cat signal. But he could have! And "the internet" would have won the day! I am Techdirt! I never forgive. I never forget. I am "the internet."

         

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          Anonymous Coward, Apr 18th, 2013 @ 1:25pm

          Re: Re: Re:

          If you hate Mike that much, then why are you reading his blog?

          Do something else, like go outside, have a beer, get high, whatever.

          I encourage everyone else in this thread, do not respond to this idiot, he clearly has issues, just report his posts, all of them...

           

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      Anonymous, Apr 18th, 2013 @ 2:26pm

      Re:

      How about those of us who agree with Mike AND hate America?

       

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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 18th, 2013 @ 10:52am

    You guys put out the cat signal and everything. Well, Mike didn't launch it on his site for some reason... Maybe that's why you guys failed. It's Mike's fault! Mike hates our privacy! He hates America (that's actually not a joke, since he really does). He hates us all!

     

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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 18th, 2013 @ 10:53am

    so, i wonder how many of that 288 will get voted back into office next election? knowing the way we forgive and ignore everything that is used to shaft us, probably 289!! i really wonder why the hell we are so fucking thick??

     

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      Anonymous Coward, Apr 18th, 2013 @ 11:11am

      Re:

      It's because people don't actually follow their representatives' records and go on thinking that the rest of Congress is the problem. It's everyone else that's causing trouble not Sweet Lil' Senator Bobby Joe from down the street and Hometown Hero Representative Davie

       

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      Suzanne Lainson (profile), Apr 18th, 2013 @ 12:37pm

      Re:

      so, i wonder how many of that 288 will get voted back into office next election? knowing the way we forgive and ignore everything that is used to shaft us, probably 289!!

      This has never been a big issue to most voters so I don't think it will have much to do with who gets re-elected. Most voters are much more concerned about other issues and if they vote on the issues, the ones more important to them will sway their votes.

       

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    ShellMG (profile), Apr 18th, 2013 @ 11:11am

    In case you missed it, here's the clerk's list:

    http://clerk.house.gov/evs/2013/roll117.xml

    Sadly, my congressman voted for it.

     

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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 18th, 2013 @ 11:25am

    So if this goes on past the Senate and Prez, and doesn't get shot down by the SC, where is the actual profit in this bill?

    We know that supporters are willing to spend hundreds of millions "lobbying" for the bill, and noone with money spends money without seeing more money or even greater loss on the horizon.

    Is the biggest profit in the ability for 'participating companies' to sell or wrongfully divulge information with complete immunity from prosecution?

    Is it in thousands of pork-barrel no-show "cyber-defense" contracts on the horizon? (I'm guessing this... nothing says profit like a huge contract with no defined goals or milestones)

    Or is it in the governments ability to better support the profit-by-litigation business model being used to prop up old-guard dying industries?

    We know we've been sold out by the HoR, but for what exactly?

     

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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 18th, 2013 @ 11:45am

    I can't believe Mike let us all down like this. If only he'd launched that cat signal. All 288 members would have seen the light--literally. But as it is, all 288 hate our privacy. Anyone who disagrees is just wrong. Only Mike Masnick speaks the truth. He'd never lie or spread FUD or do anything bad. He is my idol.

     

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    CN, Apr 18th, 2013 @ 1:00pm

    Privacy is a thing of the past, sadly.

    Even kids shows are prepping them for the future.

    "Special Agent OSO" has little bug shaped spy drones watching children all the time, transmitting to an overhead satellite.

     

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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 18th, 2013 @ 1:29pm

    I feel a bit better knowing that my rep voted Nay... only a bit...

     

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    barryvm, Apr 18th, 2013 @ 3:19pm

    Does this bill also apply to data from foreign customers of us companies (or even foreign companies with data centers in the us) ? This is obviously a disaster for businesses as I can see them losing a lot of clients this way. Not to mention the outrageous impact on privacy and judicial safeguards. I don't know if I would trust any us based company or institution with any personal info now. It's overly broad spy bills like these which diminish respect for the law and destroy any confidence in government institutions and democratic decision making.
    A victory for fear mongering and corrupt politics over rational thought and the rule of law. Sad.

     

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    barryvm, Apr 18th, 2013 @ 3:31pm

    Does this bill also apply to data from foreign customers of us companies (or even foreign companies with data centers in the us) ? This is obviously a disaster for businesses as I can see them losing a lot of clients this way. Not to mention the outrageous impact on privacy and judicial safeguards. I don't know if I would trust any us based company or institution with any personal info now. It's overly broad spy bills like these which diminish respect for the law and destroy any confidence in government institutions and democratic decision making.
    A victory for fear mongering and corrupt politics over rational thought and the rule of law. Sad.

     

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      Suzanne Lainson (profile), Apr 18th, 2013 @ 3:46pm

      Re:

      I don't know if I would trust any us based company or institution with any personal info now.

      I'm curious. Why did you trust them before? Have you been sure how your personal info is being used?

       

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    alanbleiweiss (profile), Apr 18th, 2013 @ 3:45pm

    Senator Feinstein Supports Full Immunity

    Even if the White House threatens veto, it's possible Congress is going to shove this crap down our throats.

    I just got an email from California Senator Diane Feinstein:

    "As Chairman of the Senate Intelligence Committee, I will shortly be introducing a bill on information sharing which allows sharing of cyber intrusion data with the government with full immunity. In this way we hope to encourage a major effort between the public and private sector to share data so that cyber intrusion can be prevented."

    (emphasis added by me)

    Holy crap. I swear these wealthy, corporate shill people need to be thrown out on their asses. FULL IMMUNITY.

     

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      The Real Michael, Apr 19th, 2013 @ 7:33am

      Re: Senator Feinstein Supports Full Immunity

      Their timing couldn't possibly be better, what with all that's been going on in Mass. and Texas. Distractions.

       

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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 18th, 2013 @ 4:10pm

    "I wonder if we could use a kickstarter to buy back some of our representatives."
    -FoO, from a comment on the same story at Ars Technica

    http://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/2013/04/house-passes-controversial-cybersecurity-bill -cispa-in-288-127-vote/?comments=1

    This is so good I had to pass it along. The sad thing is, it might work. Maybe?

     

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    oktroellecomputer, Apr 18th, 2013 @ 5:58pm

    Don't think Obama is "protecting your freedoms and privacy" by threatening to veto CISPA. He's more interested in protecting the government's butt in terms of the fine print and legalities are concerned when knocking down you're door and confiscating you're personal electronic devices.

     

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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 18th, 2013 @ 11:25pm

    288 to 127 would be enough to override a presidential veto. That equals about 69 percent, and it only takes 2/3 of those voting. 288/415 = 69.3 percent.

    With 20 abstensions, a veto override could go either way, if all 435 members vote.

     

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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 19th, 2013 @ 9:08am

    So is Congress that easy to sway? One bomb and no more privacy. How many bombs will our freedom cost?

    Maybe we should not be allowed to make any new policy immediately after a disaster. That way we can reduce kneejerk reactions.

     

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      Anonymous Coward, Apr 19th, 2013 @ 9:59am

      Re:

      Well, if an EXplosion causes massive support of CISPA, maybe well-placed implosions will counteract that support? I can check my pantry for some kind of cookware that can create a singularity to counteract the explosions.

       

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