Congressman Already Claims That He Needs To Overturn Supreme Court Ruling In Kirtsaeng

from the and-off-we-go dept

We fully expected efforts in Congress to look to overturn the strong and important "first sale" ruling by the Supreme Court, and it looks like they're not wasting any time. Rep. Doug Collins has already put out a statement about how awful the ruling in Kirtsaeng is and how he'll look to remedy it.
“The Supreme Court's ruling in Kirtsaeng v. Wiley raises concerning questions about the future of U.S. copyright law,” Collins said. “Many industries and businesses in Georgia rely on strong copyright protections to create jobs and invest in our local economies, including the established and exclusive right to import in to the United States. When a U.S. business harnesses innovation and creativity to develop a product, they should have certainty their copyrighted work will be protected against unauthorized importation of foreign products.

“As a Member of the House Judiciary Committee, I look forward to discussing the need for strong copyright protections with the Register of Copyrights at a subcommittee hearing tomorrow afternoon.”
No, actually, it doesn't raise any serious questions. It confirms a basic principle that "you own what you've purchased." It's amazing that a Representative who claims that he wants government to get out of the way and and that "the private sector is best at generating economic growth" would suddenly pipe up in favor of centralized monopolies handed out by the federal government. Furthermore, it's ridiculous, wrong and misleading to argue that Kirtsaeng is somehow antithetical to "strong copyright protections." The first sale doctrine has existed in the US for ages and nothing in it goes against "strong copyright protections." The Supreme Court decision standing up for first sale is hardly an attack on copyright. Even the claim about "being protected against unauthorized importation of foreign products." That's not a copyright issue, but an import issue. Here, again, Collins, who pretends to be for free trade, appears to be arguing that the US should have tariffs. It's funny what copyright will do to politicians -- including highlighting their own hypocrisies.


Reader Comments (rss)

(Flattened / Threaded)

  •  
    icon
    Ninja (profile), Mar 20th, 2013 @ 5:40am

    Can't he see the tremendous collateral damage this would cause? Suppose Kirstaeng had lost. If I were [insert any company here] I'd simply move my production abroad and voilá, no more used market and major blows tho the US economy.

    Sometimes I get this feeling your representatives actually want to break the country if it means they'll make tons of money in the process. Wake up America, take these morons out of the Govt.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

    •  
      icon
      Jeremy2020 (profile), Mar 20th, 2013 @ 7:21am

      Re:

      He can't see past the wheelbarrows of cash from special interests

       

      reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

    •  
      identicon
      The Real Michael, Mar 20th, 2013 @ 8:26am

      Re:

      This is a serious threat to our nation from within. Destroying us economically would result in far worse damage than occurred on 9/11. We're talking massive layoffs, protests, looting, widespread violence and poverty, eventually culminating in massive civil war. All because of politicians like this guy who seek to destroy us from within.

       

      reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

    •  
      identicon
      Anonymous Coward, Mar 20th, 2013 @ 9:36am

      Re:

      Of course he can see that. He just doesn't care. His job (what he gets paid for) is to further his corporate backers' interests, and that means putting away the lube and fucking the american people in the ass.

       

      reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

    •  
      identicon
      TimothyAWiseman, Mar 20th, 2013 @ 10:26am

      Re:

      Personally, I think that the Kirtseang case was well decided and that Congress should not attempt to alter the matter now.

       

      reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

    •  
      identicon
      TimothyAWiseman, Mar 20th, 2013 @ 10:26am

      Re:

      Personally, I think that the Kirtseang case was well decided and that Congress should not attempt to alter the matter now.

       

      reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

    •  
      identicon
      ICUC, Mar 22nd, 2013 @ 3:05am

      Re:

      Yup, they don't give a F about American jobs or American consumers. However, helping American corps price discriminate that's the job of the Copyright Law ? And if the cost of enabling price discrimination is the movement of even more production overseas. F the workers.

       

      reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

  •  
    icon
    silverscarcat (profile), Mar 20th, 2013 @ 6:29am

    No wonder he said this...

    He's from Georgia.

    Suddenly everything makes sense.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

    •  
      identicon
      Anonymous Coward, Mar 20th, 2013 @ 7:43am

      Re: No wonder he said this...

      Yep.

      Georgia has to make up to foreigners for briefly throwing the CEO of a foreign car manufacturer in jail for not carrying his passport on him. The CEO who opened several car factories in Georgia no less, creating hundreds of jobs in the state, the CEO was in Georgia on a business trip to visit those factories.

      What better way to make up for it then by giving him MORE reasons to manufacture his cars back in Europe where he came from by adding IP protections to foreign made goods?

       

      reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

    •  
      identicon
      Anonymous Coward, Mar 20th, 2013 @ 10:13am

      Re: No wonder he said this...

      Guam is capsizing too right?

      Gotta love the Georgia representatives.....

       

      reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

    •  
      identicon
      Anonymous Coward, Mar 20th, 2013 @ 12:31pm

      Re: No wonder he said this...

      As a resident of Atlanta, I cringe every time one of our Senators, or Reps from outside of Atlanta opens their mouth. I believe they must be having a contest with the Texas Delegation on who can utter the stupidest, most ignorant thing possible.
      With this statement, we may have taken back the lead.

       

      reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

  •  
    identicon
    Anonymous Coward, Mar 20th, 2013 @ 7:41am

    Apparently, in Georgia, stupidity is a prerequisite for the job of congresman...

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

    •  
      identicon
      Anonymous Coward, Mar 20th, 2013 @ 7:57am

      Re:

      Before calling others stupid, perhaps you should learn how to spell congressman.

       

      reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

    •  
      icon
      ltlw0lf (profile), Mar 20th, 2013 @ 12:30pm

      Re:

      Apparently, in Georgia, stupidity is a prerequisite for the job of congresman...

      For further support of your argument, I believe it was Hank Johnson (D-GA) who was worried Guam (an island) would capsize if 5,000 Marines were moved from Okinawa (another island) to Guam.

      However, I'd open up your argument in suggesting that it is all congresscritters, not just those from GA, who have a prerequisite for stupidity. In fact, I think it may be safe to say that it is a prerequisite for all public office.

       

      reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

    •  
      icon
      Niall (profile), Mar 21st, 2013 @ 8:53am

      Re:

      No worse that whichever of the Carolinas wants to legislate away sea level rise. Especially when there is a 'hot spot' of increased sea level rise on the East Coast...

       

      reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

  •  
    identicon
    Anonymous Coward, Mar 20th, 2013 @ 7:43am

    Can't wait to see the next congresman's special-interest induced, uninformed and damn-the-consequences rant against the Wiley-Kirtsaeng ruling.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

  •  
    identicon
    Anonymous Coward, Mar 20th, 2013 @ 7:45am

    "The first sale doctrine has existed in the US for ages..."

    Yes, but you see Mike, it had never interfered in the profits of the Mega-Corps.

    Now that it has, it must be removed.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

  •  
    identicon
    Anonymous Coward, Mar 20th, 2013 @ 7:47am

    Funny how the North never seems to understand the South.

    The assumption that a Southern Republican has the same values as a Northern or western is as comical as assertion that a Southern Democrats during the days of Jim Crow had the same values as a Northern one did but, some how they did work together despite what the pundits say.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

  • This comment has been flagged by the community. Click here to show it
     
    identicon
    out_of_the_blue, Mar 20th, 2013 @ 7:53am

    Mike favors grifters over publishers.

    This is NOT copyright, kids, it's international trade, which IS properly a concern of Congress. -- Wish they'd do more protectionism. -- And it's sheer arbitrage by a grifter who didn't actually produce anything.




    Take a loopy tour of Techdirt.com! You always end up at same place!
    http://techdirt.com/
    Where Mike "supports copyright" -- except when he supports some clever way to get unearned income by dodging it.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

    •  
      icon
      Ninja (profile), Mar 20th, 2013 @ 7:55am

      Re: Mike favors grifters over publishers.

      Guys, we found the new troll word of the month! And it is grifter! Whatever he thinks it means.

       

      reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

    • This comment has been flagged by the community. Click here to show it
       
      identicon
      out_of_the_blue, Mar 20th, 2013 @ 7:56am

      Re: Mike favors grifters over publishers.

      @Me: I disagree, though I am a huge fan of corporations with little to no foresight on the implications of their short term profiteering gags.



      Take a loopy tour of Techdirt.com! You always end up at same place!
      http://techdirt.com/
      Where Mike "supports copyright" -- except when he supports some clever way to get unearned income by dodging it.

       

      reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

    •  
      identicon
      Anonymous Coward, Mar 20th, 2013 @ 8:13am

      Re: Mike favors grifters over publishers.

      "And it's sheer arbitrage by a grifter who didn't actually produce anything."

      I had no idea Rep. Doug Collins was a grifter!
      Thanks for pointing that out, OooB!
      You've actually done some good, for once!

       

      reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

    •  
      identicon
      Anonymous Coward, Mar 20th, 2013 @ 8:14am

      Re: Mike favors grifters over publishers.

      "And it's sheer arbitrage by a grifter who didn't actually produce anything."

      Ok, now I'd like you (or anyone else) to explain to me why buying low and selling high is such a bad thing.

      The guy is taking advantage of price differences in different markets. If I am not mistaken, that's what's been done in business since, like, forever.

      Why is that, suddenly, grifting?

       

      reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

      •  
        identicon
        Anonymous Coward, Mar 20th, 2013 @ 8:30am

        Re: Re: Mike favors grifters over publishers.

        It isn't suddenly grifting buying low and selling high has always been grifting. Some grift is considered legitimate and some is punished by law. This is why people often struggle to see any important differences between legitimate businessmen and criminals as the only real difference in some cases is the acceptance of asserted legitimacy. Nonetheless if buying and selling is accepted as legitimate then there is no excuse to pretend to draw a distinction between Kirtsaeng and any other trader.

         

        reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

        •  
          identicon
          Anonymous Coward, Mar 20th, 2013 @ 8:34am

          Re: Re: Re: Mike favors grifters over publishers.

          "Some grift is considered legitimate and some is punished by law."

          Please show an example of buying low through legitimate means (as Kirtsaeng did) and selling at a profit is illegal, if you can, boy.
          I won't hold my breath waiting.

           

          reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

          •  
            identicon
            Beech, Mar 20th, 2013 @ 9:08am

            Re: Re: Re: Re: Mike favors grifters over publishers.

            I am fairly certain scalping tickets is considered illegal, at least in some states.

            Also, I suppose insider trading is, at it's heart, buying low/ selling high.

             

            reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

            •  
              identicon
              Anonymous Coward, Mar 20th, 2013 @ 10:28am

              Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Mike favors grifters over publishers.

              "I am fairly certain scalping tickets is considered illegal, at least in some states."

              Scalping is buying at market rate and selling for a vastly-inflated price due to scarcity.

              Not the same as legally-buying below the established price and selling still BELOW the established price, as Kirtsaeng did), with scarcity NOT being an issue.
              There were plenty of copies of the books available, just at a price students didn't want to (or couldn't) pay!
              Try again, boy.

               

              reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

              •  
                identicon
                Beech, Mar 20th, 2013 @ 12:52pm

                Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Mike favors grifters over publishers.

                Huh? Scalping is buying something for a "lower price" than what you end up selling it for. Scarcity is a part of economics...like, most of economics (at least until the internets rolled around).

                I wasn't saying scalping was the same as what Kirstaeng did, because I don't think it is. I was playing a game, a game called "provide the example" where YOU said "show an example of buying low...and selling at a profit is illegal." I DID EXACTLY THAT.

                Buy ticket at market value = legal
                Sell at higher price = illegal

                You didn't say anything about "scarcity" or "being more than what (someone) wanted to pay" in your initial request for an example. So don't blame me because YOU didn't sufficiently narrow YOUR request for an example. Dumbass.

                 

                reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

            •  
              icon
              Mark Harrill (profile), Mar 20th, 2013 @ 10:30am

              Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Mike favors grifters over publishers.

              Scalping is generally legal, see StubHub, TicketCity, etc...

              Insider Trading may be buying low and selling high but its based on information that isn't available to everyone else which makes it illegal and not a legitimate market transaction.

              Count is 0-2...

               

              reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

              •  
                identicon
                Beech, Mar 20th, 2013 @ 1:02pm

                Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Mike favors grifters over publishers.

                From wikipedia:

                "In the United States, ticket resale on the premises of the event (including adjacent parking lots that are officially part of the facility) may be prohibited by law, although these laws vary from state to state and the majority of U.S. states do not have laws in place to limit the value placed on the resale amount of event tickets or where and how these tickets should be sold. Ticket resellers may conduct business on nearby sidewalks, or advertise through newspaper ads or ticket brokers. Some U.S. states and venues encourage a designated area for resellers to stand in, on, or near the premises, while other states and venues prohibit ticket resale altogether. Resale laws, policies and practices are generally decided, practiced and governed at the local or even venue level in the U.S. and such laws and or interpretations are not currently generalized at a national level."

                So, scalping is kinda sorta sometimes illegal depending on what state you're in. Good to know. (Couldn't look it up at work and I wasn't totally sure, that's why I used all those hedging words "fairly certain," "at least in some states.")

                And, I am aware that insider trading should certainly be illegal. But that's not what Mr. AC-that-says-boy-far-too-often asked for. The only thing he asked for was an example of buying low/selling high that is illegal. Not where buying low/selling high SHOULD be illegal, or rightfully is illegal, or only "legitimate market transactions" where it's illegal. So based on the criteria dude gave, insider trading qualifies.

                I'll agree with you that I don't get a point for scalping, but I'm gonna stick with my guns and give myself a point for insider trading, so I'm 1-1.

                 

                reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

            •  
              icon
              AdamF (profile), Mar 20th, 2013 @ 11:07am

              Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Mike favors grifters over publishers.

              Scalping is buying at a regulated price and then selling at the market price.

               

              reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

          •  
            identicon
            Anonymous Coward, Mar 20th, 2013 @ 10:43am

            Re: Re: Re: Re: Mike favors grifters over publishers.

            You do realize that every time you say "boy" you give everyone the impression you're the racist owner of a plantation?

             

            reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

            •  
              icon
              Rikuo (profile), Mar 20th, 2013 @ 10:53am

              Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Mike favors grifters over publishers.

              No, he gives everyone the distinct (and correct impression) that the guy he's talking to is either, or has the mentality of, a pre-teen boy, one who doesn't think logically at all.

               

              reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

          •  
            identicon
            Anonymous Coward, Mar 21st, 2013 @ 10:42am

            Re: Re: Re: Re: Mike favors grifters over publishers.

            Sheesh, that's pretty much the point the difference between criminality and legitimate business is fundamentally the assertion and acceptance of legality.
            If a law is passed to prevent a trade it doesn't change the fundamental morality or lack of morality inherent in business.
            Many people became immensely wealthy engaging in legal business activities that were subsequently made illegal, they were at all times legitimate business people.
            But what you want is an example of a legal activity that was, at the time it was legal,illegal and expect that people might struggle to give you such an example. Well duh!

             

            reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

    •  
      identicon
      Anonymous Coward, Mar 20th, 2013 @ 8:26am

      Re: Mike favors grifters over publishers.

      Your statement is wrong because if Mike would have favoured the "grifters" as you put it, he would've been in favour of Wiley.

      If you'd have more experience in international trade than only staring at the foreign stock listings in the WSJ, you would know that it is actually illegal to put restrictions on products you've sold. It is fully legal for companies to make use of price differences in different countries, just as it is legal to have different price levels.

      If I told my boss I was trying to prevent our customers in country X from selling to county Y (or messing with their prices to make it less attractive for them) he would fire me on the spot because it is against the law and a guaranteed way to end up in court.

      Then again, I work for a company that tries to be ethical and transparent in it's approach to the market. Perhaps you should try working for one too.

       

      reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

    •  
      identicon
      Anonymous Coward, Mar 20th, 2013 @ 8:27am

      Re: Mike favors grifters over publishers.

      "This is NOT copyright, kids"

      Doug Collins appears to disagree with you.

       

      reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

      •  
        identicon
        Anonymous Coward, Mar 20th, 2013 @ 8:35am

        Re: Re: Mike favors grifters over publishers.

        "This is NOT copyright, kids"

        "Doug Collins appears to disagree with you."

        Doug Collins is an idiot.

         

        reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

    •  
      icon
      Gwiz (profile), Mar 20th, 2013 @ 8:36am

      Re: Mike favors grifters over publishers.

      And it's sheer arbitrage by a grifter who didn't actually produce anything.


      Tune in next week when Blue labels your neighborhood Girl Scouts as "grifters" for selling cookies they didn't make themselves.

       

      reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

      •  
        identicon
        JEDIDIAH, Mar 20th, 2013 @ 2:12pm

        Re: Mike favors grifters over publishers.

        I'm just waiting for him to be consistent and call mortgage derivatives traders grifters.

         

        reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

      •  
        icon
        RadialSkid (profile), Mar 20th, 2013 @ 7:29pm

        Re: Re: Mike favors grifters over publishers.

        I just sold a used truck recently. Obviously I'm a grifter as well.

         

        reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

        •  
          identicon
          Anonymous Coward, Mar 21st, 2013 @ 10:54am

          Re: Re: Re: Mike favors grifters over publishers.

          That depends, did you sell it for more than it was worth to you. A standard most would consider unreasonable but not completely invalid
          How about did you sell it for more than it was worth to the purchaser.
          You could argue here that the purchaser with perfect knowledge is in the best position to determine what its worth to them but does that require you to try to inform the purchaser of every relevant piece of information.
          What if the law doesn't require you to make certain information you have available to the purchaser but you know it would affect the price the purchaser is willing to pay.
          Knowing that most people do sell, especially second hand vehicles for as much as they possibly can while doing their best to hide or minimise any issues chances are anyone selling their second hand vehicle will be a grifter but it is possible that you specifically are not.

           

          reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

    •  
      identicon
      Anonymous Coward, Mar 20th, 2013 @ 9:15am

      Re: Mike favors grifters over publishers.

      The actual issue is that it would result in the immediate de facto end of the First Sale doctrine. If imported goods can't be resold, then all goods would be imported.

       

      reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

      •  
        identicon
        Anonymous Coward, Mar 20th, 2013 @ 9:48am

        Re: Re: Mike favors grifters over publishers.

        Well it could be argued that if imported goods can't be resold, then companies cannot import goods for resale.

         

        reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

        •  
          identicon
          Anonymous Coward, Mar 21st, 2013 @ 2:01am

          Re: Re: Re: Mike favors grifters over publishers.

          If they can't get permission from the copyright owner, then that would functionally be the case, yes.

           

          reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

    •  
      identicon
      Anonymous Coward, Mar 20th, 2013 @ 9:24am

      Re: Mike favors grifters over publishers.

      Ahhh, so you have an official response from the Commerce Dept, specifically the International Trade Administration backing up your point.

      OR did you just bend over and pull that statement

      out_of_your_butt

       

      reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

    •  
      identicon
      Anonymous Coward, Mar 20th, 2013 @ 9:44am

      Re: Mike favors grifters over publishers.

      OOTB picked up a new word, from whren I defines it yesterday. However he does not understand that arbitrage is not grifting. As for non production, most publishers produce nothing as the contract out the actual work of printing and distribution. They also rely on the work of others for content. Publishers are the grifters when it comes to textbooks.

       

      reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

    •  
      identicon
      Mason Wheeler, Mar 20th, 2013 @ 10:35am

      Re: Mike favors grifters over publishers.

      Yes, it is arbitrage. Why is that a bad thing?

      This looks like a win-win situation to me. Kirtsaeng gets some money in his pocket, the students he was selling to save some money on the monstrously exorbitant costs of textbooks, and the parasites lose out on an opportunity for ill-gotten gain. Everyone's happy.

      ...except the parasites, of course.

       

      reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

  •  
    icon
    gorehound (profile), Mar 20th, 2013 @ 7:56am

    Rep. Doug Collins another Republican who is Supposed to Stand for Liberty,Freedom From Government, and Less Regulations/Smaller Government show just how much of a Hypocrite he is.As well as being another Clueless Bought Already Politician.

    I Buy Something I Fucking Own It A-Hole ! And if not then I intend on stopping my Buying of all things I can find elsewhere for Free.Or I will just enjoy the huge Library and huge Documentary Films I own.

    I hate these Clueless Moronic Politicians.Probably got himself a Vote because he said Jesus in a Speech, Dislikes LGBT, and is a Southern Far Right Conservative.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

    •  
      identicon
      Anonymous Coward, Mar 20th, 2013 @ 2:43pm

      Re:

      Not about R or D, it's about being a tool for others. Some refuse and others get down on their knees.

      No matter how bad you think this guy is, Chris Dodd is 10 times worse in his hypocrisy.

       

      reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

      •  
        identicon
        Anonymous Coward, Mar 20th, 2013 @ 5:02pm

        Re: Re:

        Chris Dod is an industry representative, it's not hypocritical for him to represent the industry. It's his job and it's to be expected and is consistent with his position of industry representative.

        Congressmen, OTOH, are supposed to represent the public and so when they seek to represent corporate interests instead that's different.

         

        reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

        •  
          identicon
          Anonymous Coward, Mar 21st, 2013 @ 10:00am

          Re: Re: Re:

          You clearly don't remember what Dodd said and did for the industry he now represents when he was "a public representative".

          Dodd was the BIGGEST censoring prick out there...

           

          reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

  •  
    identicon
    Anonymous Coward, Mar 20th, 2013 @ 8:00am

    Uh oh. When the MAFIAA finds out people are boycotting them by buying used. They are going to use their lobbying might to ban used sales or at least get a cut.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

  •  
    identicon
    Anonymous Coward, Mar 20th, 2013 @ 8:07am

    I can't wait for all these people to die of old age (any time now), so I can become old and unreasonable in their place.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

  •  
    identicon
    trish, Mar 20th, 2013 @ 8:18am

    dumbbutt

    do we really need copuright on 'art' that consists entirely of a logo placed on a product for the sole purpose of getting copyright coverage? That;s just hilarious, til you realize that the government wants to take away the people's rights and hand them to corporations... Next we'll hear about people goin to jail for a long time for importing goods they legally purchased...

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

  •  
    identicon
    Beech, Mar 20th, 2013 @ 9:16am

    The amazing thing is the speed with which this politician's opinion was purchased. Only a day? To convince a highly placed lawmaker first sale rights are bad when a border is involved? Money talks I suppose.

    My favorite part is the rhetoric about Georgia relying on copyright etc. This case is exclusively about made in places OTHER THAN Georgia! It's helping businesses STAY in country(/ Georgia) where they are rather than moving overseas to avoid a used market! The critical thinking parts of his brain must have been overloaded by trying to comprehend all the 0s on his "campaign donation" check.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

    •  
      identicon
      Anonymous Coward, Mar 20th, 2013 @ 11:19pm

      Re:

      I agree, it's very difficult for the public to convince lawmakers to act in the public interest (ie: Make copy'right' lengths reasonable) but big corporations apparently have very fast strings when they want something done.

       

      reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

  •  
    icon
    Chosen Reject (profile), Mar 20th, 2013 @ 9:24am

    I've said it before and it remains true. Ask any one, be it economist, politicians, businessman, or layman, and they will tell you that monopolies are bad for the economy, for consumers, and for the free market. Change the word to copyright or patent and suddenly a lot of them will trip over themselves telling you how awesome and necessary they are, and how they are foundational properties of a free market.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

  •  
    icon
    Derek (profile), Mar 20th, 2013 @ 10:33am

    Costco

    IN an attempt to bring this conversation back on topic - what impact does this have on the Costco/Casio decision a while back? IIRC Casio sued Costco for selling watches that were meant ( & priced) for the European market. Casio claimed (and won) that Costco was infringing because of a small logo on the udnerside of the watch.

    Not sure any more if that was Copyright or Trademark but I thought it applied here.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

    •  
      icon
      James Burkhardt (profile), Mar 20th, 2013 @ 10:55am

      Re: Costco

      Well, prior to this (back in november) the lower courts ruled that the use of a logo was copyright misuse, i.e. that using the copyright of the logo to restrict the movement of the watch was outside of the bounds of the copyright assigned to the logo. Given that the logo was , by the companies own admission, only placed on the watch to restrict the movement of the watch, the court ruled against the watch manufacturer. I dont think it was Casio though.

       

      reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

  •  
    icon
    letherial (profile), Mar 20th, 2013 @ 10:58am

    anyone who thinks the right wing mantra of 'smaller goverment' is quite simply a idiot with no facts.

    What they realy mean is smaller government for the elite and huge gigantic government for everyone else.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

  •  
    identicon
    Anonymous Coward, Mar 20th, 2013 @ 11:18am

    Jeez! where do these morons get off? do they ever think about or realise what they are saying and how ridiculous it makes them look? a 10 year old has more savy than this Congressman. what a shame he doesn't check the facts before making himself look a complete plum!

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

  •  
    identicon
    Anonymous Coward, Mar 20th, 2013 @ 11:21am

    Sadly that's why Republicans have become now, and I could tell he was a Republican from the headline. They keep paying lip service to "freedom from government interference", but in reality the vast majority of Republicans are just pro-corporations these days - INCLUDING getting the government to support those corporations, either through lower taxes, subsidies or some kind of legal monopolies.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

  •  
    identicon
    Anonymous Coward, Mar 20th, 2013 @ 11:47am

    Since when has copyright given someone the "exclusive right to import"?

    Gives them the right to prevent others from making it, not to control resale/import/export right?

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

    •  
      icon
      Derek (profile), Mar 20th, 2013 @ 12:26pm

      Re: Right to import

      If the MAFIAA believed that copyright included a import/export right they would have never invented the region encoding on DVDs.

       

      reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

  •  
    identicon
    Special interest groups, Mar 20th, 2013 @ 2:10pm

    Pile of cash

    Well of course the Congressman would say this. Just like all US politicians, he is elected to serve his corporate interests first, then himself second, then his constituents somewhere around 10th in line. Follow the money trail back to the Congressman and you'll understand why they vote the way they do - they've been legally bribed.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

  •  
    identicon
    Anonymous Coward, Mar 20th, 2013 @ 4:54pm

    You may contact him here

    https://dougcollins.house.gov/email-me/

    Everyone should make it clear that he will lose his job if he continues his support for copy'right' and that we should make the rest of his life miserable if he gets a revolving door job afterwords. In fact, getting a revolving door after supporting IP laws should be illegal and subject to punishment far worse than infringement. This is an outrage that this revolving door problem goes unpunished while doing nothing wrong, like infringement, is subject to huge punishments.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]


Add Your Comment

Have a Techdirt Account? Sign in now. Want one? Register here
Get Techdirt’s Daily Email
Save me a cookie
  • Note: A CRLF will be replaced by a break tag (<br>), all other allowable HTML will remain intact
  • Allowed HTML Tags: <b> <i> <a> <em> <br> <strong> <blockquote> <hr> <tt>
Follow Techdirt
A word from our sponsors...
Essential Reading
Techdirt Reading List
Techdirt Insider Chat
A word from our sponsors...
Recent Stories
A word from our sponsors...

Close

Email This