Mexico's IP Office Surprised Its Congress By Signing ACTA, And Now Hopes To Win Their Support

from the good-luck-with-that dept

Right after the EU Parliament somewhat emphatically rejected ACTA, there was a report saying that ACTA was pretty much dead in Mexico as well -- especially since the Congress there had been against ACTA since before it was "cool" to be against ACTA. However, the very next day, the Mexican government surprised an awful lot of people by signing ACTA anyway.

Of course, the agreement still needs ratification, and that seems like an uphill battle. However, the Mexican IP Office -- major backer of ACTA -- is now claiming that it believes that the Mexican legislature can be convinced to sign on. Of course, it would help if the Mexican IP Office was even the slightest bit intellectually honest. For example, in explaining its reasons for signing on, it points out that the EU signed on -- which is kind of funny coming so soon after the EU Parliament's wholesale rejection of ACTA. Seems like that would be a point worth mentioning, rather than implying that ACTA was going to be implemented in the EU. This move still has the US's fingerprints all over it. The US needed some sort of "win" for ACTA these days, and coming so soon after the US allowed Mexico to enter TPP negotiations, it's hard not to think that there was some horse trading going on here.


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    Ron, Jul 16th, 2012 @ 10:17am

    Bridge

    ".. it points out that the EU signed on ..."

    So, if the EU Parliament jumped off a bidge, then Mexico's Legislature should as well?

     

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    Anonymous Coward, Jul 16th, 2012 @ 10:22am

    I won't be surprised that when the treaty is rejected, Mexico will find itself outside negotiations once again.

     

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    Anonymous Coward, Jul 16th, 2012 @ 10:26am

    There is only one relevant political person in Mexico and that is the president. All others will do exactly as instructed.

     

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    Anonymous Coward, Jul 16th, 2012 @ 10:35am

    how long we got to wait now to see it Mexico is run by the Mexican govt, the US govt or perhaps, the EU Commission? if they think they will get the chance to have input for the TPP by doing this, they are mistaken!

     

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    ChurchHatesTucker (profile), Jul 16th, 2012 @ 10:58am

    The US needed some sort of "win" for ACTA these days, and coming so soon after the US allowed Mexico to enter TPP negotiations, it's hard not to think that there was some horse trading going on here.

    Yeah, I wonder what we gave away to get them to support this monstrosity.

     

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    Loki, Jul 16th, 2012 @ 11:16am

    Massive public protests cause SOPA to collapse. Next day US government makes high profile seizure of MegaUpload.

    Massive rejection of ACTA by EU Parliament. Next day high profile signatory of Mexico to ACTA.

    In a day and age where information can spread to hundreds of millions of people in a matter of minutes, does the US government really think nobody is going to notice their attempts at bait and switch?

     

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    Anonymous Coward, Jul 16th, 2012 @ 11:18am

    considering Mexico's Congress had rejected ACTA, what right did the IP Office have to sign it anyway? how can them signing ACTA have any validity when not authorised to sign anything on Mexico's behalf?

     

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      Mason Wheeler, Jul 16th, 2012 @ 11:24am

      Re:

      The same way as President Obama can illegally sign ACTA and get away with it.

       

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      TtfnJohn (profile), Jul 16th, 2012 @ 12:42pm

      Re:

      I don't think they'd rejected it yet and the Mexican Congress is vastly more independent of the Mexican president that at least one poster here seems to think.

       

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        Anonymous Coward, Jul 16th, 2012 @ 3:31pm

        Re: Re:

        Good, it looks like the Mexican congress still doesn't like ACTA, so this was a waste of time for the US (if it really was it's idea. We can't be entirely sure)

         

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    gorehound (profile), Jul 16th, 2012 @ 12:31pm

    I am not fooled by the things our US Government is doing.I would love to see both Democrats & Republicans out of Office.
    And I would love to see Big Content go the way of the Dinosaurs.Adapt or go Extinct !

     

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    Jay (profile), Jul 16th, 2012 @ 12:54pm

    Wait... Is the IP office in Mexico a part of the executive branch?

     

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      mematematica (profile), Jul 16th, 2012 @ 3:36pm

      Re:

      Yes, it's called IMPI (Instituto Mexicano de la Propiedad Industrial) and it's an arm of the secretary of commerce, which its in turn dependent of the president. All of those are the executive branch.

       

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    Anonymous Coward, Jul 17th, 2012 @ 10:50am

    The Mexican election is suspicious as well, with the winning canidate favoring U.S. corporations.

    How'd that "war on drugs" work out? It seems we have entered another "war" on IP now. Stupid.

     

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