Speak Out Against CISPA: Join The Twitter Campaign And Contact Your Representative

from the get-involved dept

On Friday, the House Intelligence Committee released a new draft of CISPA, the dangerous cybersecurity bill that threatens to give the government access to huge amounts of personal data. Despite small improvements in some areas, the bill still has huge problems and lacks adequate privacy safeguards—and the House is going to vote on it next week. As part of a final push to let Congress know what people think of this bad legislation, several organizations have launched public action campaigns that you can get involved in.

Firstly, there is the Congress Wants Too Much Information campaign on Twitter. Multiple groups are asking you to tweet your thoughts on CISPA with the hashtags #CongressTMI and #CISPA. U.S. citizens can look up and tag their representatives' Twitter accounts—and you can also include @HouseIntelComm, the authors of the bill. The groups behind the campaign suggest pointing out examples of data that could, but shouldn't, be shared under CISPA, such as:

@Myrepresentative Does the FBI need to know what books I checked out from my local library? #CongressTMI Stop #CISPA

@Myrepresentative Does the military need to know I send my Mom lolcat pictures? #CongressTMI Stop #CISPA

@Myrepresentative Does the NSA need to know I watch Netflix from my work computer? #CongressTMI Stop #CISPA

Now is also the time to directly contact members of Congress by phone or by email. There are tools to make this easier from the ACLU, the EFF and Free Press.

Pressure is also increasing on the companies that back CISPA, especially those in the technology sphere. In addition to contacting Congress, you can send a message to CISPA's private supporters by signing AccessNow's petition to all of them, and Demand Progress' petition directed specifically at Facebook.

CISPA still enjoys a lot of support in Congress, but the growing public backlash means the bill's future is uncertain. With continued effort, Congress can be convinced to back off and work on crafting smarter, more narrowly tailored cybersecurity legislation that protects people's privacy.

Of equal importance is the bigger message this sends to lawmakers. There are many people who still think what happened with SOPA was a fluke, driven by the technology lobby and a few key tech companies. But the growing opposition to CISPA—a bill supported by many of the same tech giants that opposed SOPA—proves that it was something much more significant, and that the online community will not be ignored when it comes to decisions that govern the internet.



Reader Comments (rss)

(Flattened / Threaded)

  1.  
    icon
    DannyB (profile), Apr 16th, 2012 @ 10:03am

    How dare them!

    How dare the people of a democracy try to pressure their representatives to actually represent them by not backing legislation that is against the public interest and only in the interest of a few private individuals?

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  2.  
    identicon
    Anonymous Coward, Apr 16th, 2012 @ 10:06am

    So far, Chuck Grassley has responded with the letter P.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  3.  
    identicon
    Anonymous Coward, Apr 16th, 2012 @ 10:13am

    Give Microsoft and Facebook HELL for supporting CISPA. Why is it that everytime there's one of these terrible bills that affect Internet freedom, Microsoft is supporting it?

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  4.  
    icon
    :Lobo Santo (profile), Apr 16th, 2012 @ 10:21am

    Re: Microsoft Basterds...?

    So they can later bend their friends and the laws in their favor.

    Hadn't you heard about that stupid "secure BIOS" bullshit Microsoft was trying to pull? "Secure" in this instance means only Microsoft products are allowed.

    They hate sharing and open-source (except when they're copying the features from various Linux distros for their next Windows version) and want control. Why wouldn't Microsoft go along with this??

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  5.  
    icon
    Pwdrskir (profile), Apr 16th, 2012 @ 10:21am

    Internet Community Lobby - ICL

    Why hasn't the ICL posted their own bill and pitched it like the countless lobbies in DC do every day?

    Why do we wait for these asses to post the bill and play defense? Offence is the best defense!

    EFF, TechDirt, FreePress, etc need put together a bill that strictly PROHIBITS the kind of crap these asses keep pushing because sooner or later, they will sneak one by.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  6.  
    icon
    Pwdrskir (profile), Apr 16th, 2012 @ 10:27am

    Re: Internet Community Lobby - ICL

    Offense was my intention, but it kind of works the other way too.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  7.  
    identicon
    Anonymous Coward, Apr 16th, 2012 @ 10:28am

    Re:

    Boycott Google too for their support.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  8.  
    icon
    Keii (profile), Apr 16th, 2012 @ 10:33am

    This bill is ++ungood.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  9.  
    identicon
    Anonymous Coward, Apr 16th, 2012 @ 10:42am

    Typo

    "by singing AccessNow's petition"
    Or 'signing' perhaps?

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  10.  
    icon
    Leigh Beadon (profile), Apr 16th, 2012 @ 10:44am

    Re: Typo

    well, I was thinking that if everyone sang loud enough, Congress couldn't possibly ignore it. But your idea is admittedly better - post updated ;)

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  11.  
    icon
    silverscarcat (profile), Apr 16th, 2012 @ 11:20am

    What do you do when your congressman doesn't have Twitter?

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  12.  
    identicon
    Anonymous Coward, Apr 16th, 2012 @ 11:43am

    A petition directed at Facebook?

    What an amazingly stupid idea. Facebook will do whatever the hell it likes, and what it likes is "whatever makes money for Facebook". Unless there is a sudden, permanent, mass exodus -- which is very unlikely -- they have absolutely no reason to pay the slightest attention to this or any other petition.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  13.  
    icon
    harbingerofdoom (profile), Apr 16th, 2012 @ 11:46am

    whats twitter?

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  14.  
    identicon
    Anon, Apr 16th, 2012 @ 12:00pm

    #YouAreOver ( only thing they are scared of )

    @Myrepresentative
    Do you know 91% disapprove of congress #CongressTMI Stop #CISPA

    @Myrepresentative
    91% KNOW 4 FACT congress are corrupt #CongressTMI Stop #CISPA or #YouAreOver

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  15.  
    identicon
    Anonymous Coward, Apr 16th, 2012 @ 12:05pm

    What do you do when your congressman doesn't have The Twitter?

    Fixed.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  16.  
    icon
    Ninja (profile), Apr 16th, 2012 @ 12:07pm

    Re: Re: Typo

    Aw, I thought we'd finally hear the CISPA rap by Marcus =/

    You, sir, broke the heart of an AC =(

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  17.  
    identicon
    Anon, Apr 16th, 2012 @ 12:11pm

    Re: How dare them!

    Fox News now classify it as terrorism.


    _____Jeopardy_____

    The terrorist attacks by ... Anonymous / Privacy / Freedom / Iraq / FileSharing etc...

    ANS: ....what are we being protected from ?

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  18.  
    icon
    Leigh Beadon (profile), Apr 16th, 2012 @ 12:12pm

    Re: Re: Re: Typo

    Heh. That, my friend, is a tempting idea... but I don't think I could ever match Dan Bull's ability to write lyrics about politics.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  19.  
    identicon
    Anonymous Coward, Apr 16th, 2012 @ 12:16pm

    That whole library example is a non-issue. Ever since the Patriot Act required libraries to share patron records the vast majority of libraries in the US have switched to systems that no longer record your check-out history.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  20.  
    identicon
    Idwal, Apr 16th, 2012 @ 12:18pm

    Re:

    Find their email address and sign them up for Techdirt, Demand Progress, Access Now and EFF updates?

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  21.  
    icon
    Ninja (profile), Apr 16th, 2012 @ 12:18pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Typo

    Give Cesar what belongs to Cesar and leave the rap to Dan Bull. 100% agreed. But you certainly made at least one of yur AC fans frustrated today.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  22.  
    identicon
    Idwal, Apr 16th, 2012 @ 12:22pm

    Re: A petition directed at Facebook?

    The idea is to *threaten* a sudden permanent mass exodus to see if they'll remove their support.

    As it is, the moment facebook starts voluntarily handing out my private information without my sayso or a warrant, I will exit, and I will take everyone I can with me.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  23.  
    identicon
    Idwal, Apr 16th, 2012 @ 12:24pm

    Re:

    Yeah. That was such a weird coincidence. I wonder why they did that.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  24.  
    icon
    gorehound (profile), Apr 16th, 2012 @ 12:27pm

    Re: Internet Community Lobby - ICL

    So, how many Millions do we need to Raise to buy some Politicians ?

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  25.  
    identicon
    Anonymous Coward, Apr 16th, 2012 @ 12:46pm

    Re: Re:

    What? Nice sourcing job you did for the readership.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  26.  
    identicon
    Anonymous Coward, Apr 16th, 2012 @ 12:47pm

    Re: Re:

    What? Nice sourcing job you did for the readership.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  27.  
    identicon
    Micah Lee, Apr 16th, 2012 @ 1:56pm

    Use EFF's Twitter look-up tool to Tweet at Congress

    EFF made a website that lets you check to see if your representative in the House uses Twitter and helps you draft a Tweet to them: https://cyberspying.eff.org/

    If you're not sure if your rep uses Twitter (or even who your rep is), use this tool. If your rep doesn't use Twitter you can always Tweet directly to the House Intelligence Committee, @HouseIntelComm.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  28.  
    identicon
    Anonymous Coward, Apr 16th, 2012 @ 2:46pm

    Re: Re: Re:

    https://www.popvox.com/bills/us/112/hr3523

    Google's a member of 3 of the 8 organizations listed as endorsing CISPA: TechAmerica, CTIA, and Information Technology Industry Council.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  29.  
    identicon
    Pixelation, Apr 16th, 2012 @ 8:46pm

    Call me an idiot...

    but I don't get how this isn't a total violation of the 4th amendment.
    "The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects..."

    I don't even know how to articulate how disturbing this is to me.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  30.  
    icon
    Drew (profile), Apr 17th, 2012 @ 3:17am

    Does the FBI need to know I love lesbian porn?

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  31.  
    identicon
    Anonymous Coward, Apr 17th, 2012 @ 1:59pm

    Re: Re: Re:

    http://thehill.com/blogs/hillicon-valley/technology/221977-gop-chairman-google-supportive-of-controv ersial-cybersecurity-bill-cispa

    Google has been working behind the scenes with lawmakers in the House on a controversial cybersecurity bill, Rep. Mike Rogers (R-Mich.) told The Hill.

    Rogers, the chairman of the House Intelligence Committee, said Google has been “supportive” of his Cyber Intelligence Sharing and Protection Act (CISPA), which has angered some of the same Internet activists who joined with Google to defeat the Stop Online Piracy Act (SOPA).

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  32.  
    identicon
    Rwolf, Apr 27th, 2012 @ 1:05pm

    ISPA Legislation Is Disguised—Fascism

    CISPA the Cyber Intelligence Sharing and Protection Act if signed into law will allow——the military and NSA warrant-less spying on Americans’ confidential electronic Communications; any transmitted private information circumventing the fourth amendment. CISPA will allow any self-protected cyber entity to share with the Feds any person’s private information that might allegedly relate to a cyber threat or crime. Considering the U.S. Government’s current business relationship with telephone and Internet companies, it should be expected the feds would use CISPA to gain unprecedented access to lawful Americans’ private electronic communications. Almost every week news media reports corrupt police arrested for selling drugs, taking bribes and perjury. It is foreseeable that broad provisions in CISPA that call for private businesses / cyber entities to share with Spy Agencies confidential information will open the door for corrupt government and police to sell a corporations’ confidential information to its competitors, foreign government and others. CISPA provides insufficient safeguards to control disposition of (shared) confidential corporate / cyber entity information, including confidential information shared by spy agencies with private entities derived from spying on Americans.

    The recently House Passed Cyber Security Bill overrides the Fourth Amendment. Government may use against Americans in Criminal, Civil and Administrative courts (any information) derived from CISPA warrant-less spying. CISPA will open the door for U.S. Government spy agencies such as NSA; the FBI; government asset forfeiture contractors, any private entity (to take out of context) any innocent—hastily written email, fax or phone call to allege a crime or violation was committed to cause a person’s arrest, assess fines and or civilly forfeit a business or property. There are more than 350 laws and violations that can subject property to government asset forfeiture. Government civil asset forfeiture requires only a civil preponderance of evidence for police to forfeit property, little more than hearsay.

    CISPA (warrant-less electronic surveillance) will enable the U.S. Justice Department to bypass the Fourth Amendment, use information extracted from CISPA electronic surveillance) of Americans’ Web Server Records, Internet Activity, transmitted emails, faxes, and phone calls to issue subpoenas in hopes of finding evidence or to prosecute Citizens for any alleged crime or violation. If the current CISPA is signed into law it is problematic federal, state and local law enforcement agencies and private government contractors will want access to prior Bush II NSA and other government illegally obtained electronic records to secure evidence to arrest Americans; civilly forfeit their homes, businesses and other assets under Title 18USC and other laws. Of obvious concern, what happens to fair justice in America if police become dependent on “Asset Forfeiture” to help pay their salaries and budget operating costs?

    Note: the passed “Civil Asset Forfeiture Reform Act of 2000” (effectively eliminated) the “five year statue of limitations” for Government Civil Asset Forfeiture of property: the statute now runs five years (from the date) police allege they “learned” an asset became subject to forfeiture. If CISPA takes affect, allows (no warrant) electronic government surveillance of Americans, it is expected CISPA will be used by government not only to thwart cyber threats, but to aggressively prosecute Americans and businesses for any alleged crime: U.S. Government spy and police agencies; quasi government contractors for profit, will relentlessly sift through Citizen and businesses’ (government retained Internet data), emails and phone communications) to discover possible crimes or civil violations. A corrupt U.S. Government Administration too easily use CISPA no-warrant-seized emails, faxes, Internet data and phone call information) to target, blackmail and extort its political opposition; selectively target any Citizen, corporation and others in the manner Hitler used his Nazi passed legislation that permitted no-warrant Nazi police searches and seizure of Citizens and businesses or to extort support for the Nazi fascist government. Hitler Nazi Laws made it possible for the Nazi’s to strong-armed German parliament to pass Hitler’s 1933 Discriminatory Decrees that suspended the Constitutional Freedoms of German Citizens. History shows how that turned out.

    CISPA warrant-less electronic surveillance) has the potential of turning America into a similar Fascist Police State.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  33.  
    identicon
    Rwolf, Apr 30th, 2012 @ 8:36am

    CISPA Legislation Is Disguised—Fascism

    CISPA the Cyber Intelligence Sharing and Protection Act if signed into law will allow——the military and NSA warrant-less spying on Americans’ confidential electronic Communications; any transmitted private information circumventing the fourth amendment. CISPA will allow any self-protected cyber entity to share with the Feds any person’s private information that might allegedly relate to a cyber threat or crime. Considering the U.S. Government’s current business relationship with telephone and Internet companies, it should be expected the feds would use CISPA to gain unprecedented access to lawful Americans’ private electronic communications. Almost every week news media reports corrupt police arrested for selling drugs, taking bribes and perjury. It is foreseeable that broad provisions in CISPA that call for private businesses / cyber entities to share with Spy Agencies confidential information will open the door for corrupt government and police to sell a corporations’ confidential information to its competitors, foreign government and others. CISPA provides insufficient safeguards to control disposition of (shared) confidential corporate / cyber entity information, including confidential information shared by spy agencies with private entities derived from spying on Americans.

    The recent House Passed Cyber Security Bill overrides the Fourth Amendment. Government may use against Americans in Criminal, Civil and Administrative courts (any information) derived from CISPA warrant-less spying.

    CISPA will open the door for U.S. Government spy agencies such as NSA; the FBI; government asset forfeiture contractors, any private entity (to take out of context) any innocent—hastily written email, fax or phone call to allege a crime or violation was committed to cause a person’s arrest, assess fines and or civilly forfeit a business or property. There are more than 350 laws and violations that can subject property to government asset forfeiture. Government civil asset forfeiture requires only a civil preponderance of evidence for police to forfeit property, little more than hearsay.

    CISPA (warrant-less electronic surveillance) will enable the U.S. Justice Department to bypass the Fourth Amendment, use information extracted from CISPA electronic surveillance) of Americans’ Web Server Records, Internet Activity, transmitted emails, faxes, and phone calls to issue subpoenas in hopes of finding evidence or to prosecute Citizens for any alleged crime or violation. If the current CISPA is signed into law it is problematic federal, state and local law enforcement agencies and private government contractors will want access to prior Bush II NSA and other government illegally obtained electronic records to secure evidence to arrest Americans; civilly forfeit their homes, businesses and other assets under Title 18USC and other laws. Of obvious concern, what happens to fair justice in America if police become dependent on “Asset Forfeiture” to help pay their salaries and budget operating costs?

    Note: the passed “Civil Asset Forfeiture Reform Act of 2000” (effectively eliminated) the “five year statue of limitations” for Government Civil Asset Forfeiture of property: the statute now runs five years (from the date) police allege they “learned” an asset became subject to forfeiture. If CISPA takes affect, allows (no warrant) electronic government surveillance of Americans, it is expected CISPA will be used by government not only to thwart cyber threats, but to aggressively prosecute Americans and businesses for any alleged crime: U.S. Government spy and police agencies; quasi government contractors for profit, will relentlessly sift through Citizen and businesses’ (government retained Internet data), emails and phone communications) to discover possible crimes or civil violations.

    A corrupt U.S. Government Administration too easily use CISPA no-warrant-seized emails, faxes, Internet data and phone call information) to target, blackmail and extort its political opposition; target any Citizen, corporation and others in the manner Hitler used his Nazi passed legislation that permitted no-warrant Nazi police searches and seizure of Citizens and businesses or to extort support for the Nazi fascist government. Hitler Nazi Laws made it possible for the Nazis to strong-arm German parliament to pass Hitler’s 1933 Discriminatory Decrees that suspended the Constitutional Freedoms of German Citizens. History shows how that turned out.

    CISPA warrant-less electronic surveillance) has the potential of turning America into a Fascist Police State.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]


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