Public Interest Groups Speak Out About Next Week's Secret Meeting In Hollywood To Negotiate TPP (Think International SOPA)

from the speak-up dept

We've been pointing out all week that the anti-SOPA folks who just discovered ACTA shouldn't stop there, but should pay close attention to what's happening with the TPP (Trans-Pacific Partnership). That's the agreement that the entertainment industry is betting on to get SOPA-like laws introduced around the globe. And, if you thought that ACTA was negotiated in secret, you haven't seen anything. Rather than learn their lesson from the excessive and damaging secrecy around ACTA, it appears that the USTR has decided that the lesson to learn is "we can be as secret as we want... and we still win." Of course, this seriously underestimates the mood of the public towards backroom deals on IP laws that will benefit a few large industries at the expense of the public (in a big, big way).

To show just how ridiculous this is, it has been leaked out that next week there will be a negotiation over TPP. Unlike ACTA, where at least the negotiators would admit where and when negotiations were happening (though, not always with much time for others to get there in time), the TPP negotiations are kept entirely in the dark from the public. However, it has leaked out that the next negotiation is happening from January 31st through February 4th... in West Hollywood (where else?). A bunch of public interest groups are speaking out against this super secret process, and will be hosting an event in LA the day before these negotiations, to educate people on just how bad TPP is. If you're in the area, it'll be worth attending (details at the link above).


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  1.  
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    Trails (profile), Jan 26th, 2012 @ 11:05am

    Keep on Wailin' on 'em

    Keep on em Mike.

     

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  2.  
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    TaCktiX (profile), Jan 26th, 2012 @ 11:06am

    Here's hoping the ball of active participation by the public in issues that heavily affect the public keeps on rolling. I'd love to have all of extremely-powerful-and-drunk-on-it folks wake up to realize that the "idiot" public is no longer so idiotic.

     

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  3.  
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    Skeptical Cynic (profile), Jan 26th, 2012 @ 11:06am

    DAMN THE INTERNET!@!!!#!@#!$

    In this day and age of the internet how the heck are we suppose to hold our backroom meetings without people knowing about them??????

    We can't get anything done in secret anymore!!!!

    Ban the INTERNET!!!

     

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  4.  
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    TDR, Jan 26th, 2012 @ 11:14am

    "You fell victim to one of the classic blunders, the most famous of which is, never get involved in a corporate war in America! But only slightly less well known is this: never go in against Hollywood when freedom is on the line! AHAHAHAHA! AHAHAHA—" *thunk*

     

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  5.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Jan 26th, 2012 @ 11:14am

    OT: MEP quits ACTA 'charade' in protest at EU signing

    https://www.laquadrature.net/wiki/ACTA_rapporteur_denounces_ACTA_mascarade

    Kader Arif, rapporteur for ACTA in the European Parliament quit his role as rapporteur saying:

    ”I want to denounce in the strongest possible manner the entire process that led to the signature of this agreement: no inclusion of civil society organisations, a lack of transparency from the start of the negotiations, repeated postponing of the signature of the text without an explanation being ever given, exclusion of the EU Parliament's demands that were expressed on several occasions in our assembly.”

    “As rapporteur of this text, I have faced never-before-seen manoeuvres from the right wing of this Parliament to impose a rushed calendar before public opinion could be alerted, thus depriving the Parliament of its right to expression and of the tools at its disposal to convey citizens' legitimate demands.”

     

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  6.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Jan 26th, 2012 @ 11:20am

    What we need are (perhaps constitutional) laws that more specifically limit copy protection laws (ie: lengths).

     

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  7.  
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    :Lobo Santo (profile), Jan 26th, 2012 @ 11:21am

    Re: OT: MEP quits ACTA 'charade' in protest at EU signing

    I had to look it up, so in case anybody else would need to:
    Rapporteur (derived from French) is used in international and European legal and political contexts to refer to a person appointed by a deliberative body to investigate an issue or a situation.

     

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  8.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Jan 26th, 2012 @ 11:29am

    What I don't get

    Conspiracy theories are fun and all, but being a sane person, I tend to believe that the MPAA's and RIAA's of the world are doing what they genuinely feel is right for their constituents.

    So what I don't get is why all the secrecy? I mean if I'm doing , and I truly believe that it's in the best interest of those I represent, I'm not going to be all that secretive about the process. Sure I may be a little under-handed about not getting everyone at the table because I'd like to keep the discussions one-sided, but straight-up cloak-and-dagger secrecy?

    That implies to me that the sponsors of this type of thing are either 1) clinically mentally unstable (of the paranoid schizophrenia type) or 2) they are completely aware that what they are doing is morally wrong.

     

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  9.  
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    Hephaestus (profile), Jan 26th, 2012 @ 11:29am

    A while back i pointed out, the harder they push the more light would be shined on these agreements. With the way that they are pushing these forward, with no regard for what is right and wrong or public opinion, is just showing the public at large how corrupt they are. This is going to snowball into something much larger than a simple protest against SOPA, PIPA, ACTA, and the TPP.

     

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  10.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Jan 26th, 2012 @ 11:30am

    Re: What I don't get

    Sorry - the angle brackets broke this sentence:

    I mean, if I'm doing [insert activity here], ...

     

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  11. This comment has been flagged by the community. Click here to show it
     
    identicon
    Anonymous Coward, Jan 26th, 2012 @ 11:37am

    TPP (Think International SOPA

    International SOPA? That must be terrible. I hate it! And I don't need to know anything else about it! Rabble! Rabble!

    Way to motivate the troops, Mike.

     

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  12.  
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    Rikuo (profile), Jan 26th, 2012 @ 11:42am

    Re:

    Why not? Two words that sum up TPP very well.

     

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  13.  
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    deadzone (profile), Jan 26th, 2012 @ 11:43am

    Re:

    You guys really are getting desperate huh? I guess it's all part of the long process of adjusting to reality that your kind is going through...

     

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  14.  
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    Skeptical Cynic (profile), Jan 26th, 2012 @ 11:50am

    Re:

    Your right the name "Trans-Pacific Partnership" is so descriptive.

     

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  15.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Jan 26th, 2012 @ 11:50am

    So this is what its gonna come down to, passing laws under the rader, before the public has a chance to review the affects of the law and able to form an honest opinion on it.

    Would'nt be to bad, if we the people had the power to retract said law after the fact, nope, that would make to much sense and alot of companies just a little less rich

     

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  16.  
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    Skeptical Cynic (profile), Jan 26th, 2012 @ 11:59am

    Re:

    So this is what its gonna come down to, passing laws under the rader, before the public has a chance to review the affects of the law and able to form an honest opinion on it.

    Nothing new here. The difference is that with the internet it is just getting harder for them to hide it.

    Which is why there is more and more attention on cracking down on the internet. Of course in the name of stopping all kinds of bad things from happening like they always do.

    Our Liberty and Freedom were not seized from us but eroded away one tiny law at a time

     

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  17.  
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    Franklin G Ryzzo (profile), Jan 26th, 2012 @ 12:05pm

    Re: What I don't get

    Conspiracy theories are fun and all, but being a sane person, I tend to believe that the MPAA's and RIAA's of the world are doing what they genuinely feel is right for their constituents


    I believe you are correct, but the question is who are these constituents they represent? It has been shown time and time again that those they claim to represent (content creators) are not the ones that benefit from their ever expanding purchase of legislation. The true constituents that benefit from these things are the legacy gatekeepers who are obsessed with controlling distribution to keep from having to change a dead business model. It's only a conspiracy theory if it doesn't represent reality.

     

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  18.  
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    bob, Jan 26th, 2012 @ 12:08pm

    Are they really in the public's interest?

    I love the idea that the folks on the side of Big Search, Big Piracy and Big Hardware are also "public interest", but the folks on the side of Big Content are just evil.

    The EFF is funded by Google's charity. I'm sure many of these so called "public interest" groups are also heavily funded by copyright haters.

    The fact is that the public is filled with people who are glad that copyright protects their creations. They may be indifferent about actually paying for other people's works, but they love the fact that the law is on their side when they create something.

    The CC license or any open source license get their strength
    from copyright.

    That's why I say people like me are really working in the public's interest. And this is why reputable newspapers look for neutral descriptions to avoid loaded phrases like 'public interest.'

    The folks who hate copyright and pay for this astroturfing are the ones who hate to give any more to creators.

     

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  19.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Jan 26th, 2012 @ 12:08pm

    If you live in the area you should soooo go and protest...

     

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  20.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Jan 26th, 2012 @ 12:11pm

    Didn't MPAA just say they want to have an open discussion now? So once again they are lying, huh?

     

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  21.  
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    hothmonster, Jan 26th, 2012 @ 12:15pm

    Re: Are they really in the public's interest?

    "grumble grumble paywall grumble mumble lawn grumble grumble damn kids"

    ftfy

     

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  22.  
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    Skeptical Cynic (profile), Jan 26th, 2012 @ 12:20pm

    Re: Are they really in the public's interest?

    I don't want to waste time by pointing out the many, many things wrong with your comment. I am just going to say one thing.

    Even if everything you say is true, do you really want to live in a world where laws are decided on in secret?

     

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  23.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Jan 26th, 2012 @ 12:23pm

    Re: Are they really in the public's interest?

    "I likes them BIG."

    -paywall bob

     

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  24.  
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    kirillian (profile), Jan 26th, 2012 @ 12:25pm

    Re: Re: Are they really in the public's interest?

    People like you are working for Big Content. Just because we happen to be real people who are innovating and happen to agree with the EFF's stance or just because Google also agrees doesn't make these "public interest groups" astroturfing. It means that the public is upset about the privileges that Big Content has enjoyed and abused for so long. The public isn't happy that copyright is around for 150 years after death. Big Content is. Sure you can find anecdotal evidence of a couple people that are happy with it, but the evidence points to the fact that society is fed up with it. Piracy is only a part of that evidence. The public outcries against SOPA only showed that Big Content had overextended itself too far. There is a lot of evidence to show that, well...you're just full of bullshit.

     

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  25.  
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    Mike42 (profile), Jan 26th, 2012 @ 12:37pm

    Re: Are they really in the public's interest?

    Then why hide behind closed doors? Get public input on everything! You have nothing to hide.

     

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  26.  
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    btrussell (profile), Jan 26th, 2012 @ 12:37pm

    "US Copyright Lobby Wants Canada Out of TPP Until New Laws Passed, Warns of No Cultural Exceptions"
    http://www.michaelgeist.ca/content/view/6243/125/

    Thankfully!

    Let's hope enough up here rally to stop our representatives? from caving.

     

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  27.  
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    ken (profile), Jan 26th, 2012 @ 12:42pm

    Nothing in the public interest is ever done in secret.

     

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  28.  
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    Dan (profile), Jan 26th, 2012 @ 12:45pm

    The industy's assertion isn't wrong...unfortunately

    "we can be as secret as we want... and we still win."

    This is true. Obama signed the thing, after all. Looks like they were right.

     

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  29.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Jan 26th, 2012 @ 12:52pm

    Re: The industy's assertion isn't wrong...unfortunately

    "we can be as secret as we want... and we still win."
    "This is true. Obama signed the thing, after all. Looks like they were right."

    What "thing" was that, boy?

     

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  30.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Jan 26th, 2012 @ 12:53pm

    USTR Out Of Control

    The USTR appears to have shaken off all political control and any accountability to the public. It is now the very embodiment of "regulatory capture". Which minister is supposed to be in charge of the USTR? How about holding the minister accountable? How about some very public sackings of senior USTR bureaucrats?

     

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  31.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Jan 26th, 2012 @ 1:06pm

    Re: Are they really in the public's interest?

    Bob,

    You say you are working in the public interest, but your definition of public and my definition are quite dissimilar. Following a meme from an above thread, I do not think it means what you think it means. I, for one, go back to this pesky document that you and your ilk absolutely hate. It is called the US Constitution.

     

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  32.  
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    Rikuo (profile), Jan 26th, 2012 @ 1:08pm

    Re: Re: Are they really in the public's interest?

    Wish I could Insight vote your comment +1000 times.

     

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  33.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Jan 26th, 2012 @ 1:11pm

    Re: Re: The industy's assertion isn't wrong...unfortunately

    I'm guessing ACTA

     

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  34.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Jan 26th, 2012 @ 1:16pm

    So if the agreement is totally being negotiated in secret, how do you know it's not the international version of Wyden's OPEN Act? How do you even have any idea of what it says? Your Keystone Kops hysterics are certainly entertaining. You have no idea what is says, but by God your against it. Try a thicker tinfoil hat you fucking wing nut.

     

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  35.  
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    Rekrul, Jan 26th, 2012 @ 1:17pm

    Rather than learn their lesson from the excessive and damaging secrecy around ACTA, it appears that the USTR has decided that the lesson to learn is "we can be as secret as we want... and we still win."

    Damaging secrecy? Damaging to whom? Not to them, since they got Obama to sign ACTA, and that's really all that matters to them. The last part of the line is absolutely correct. What they learned is that if you keep the details as secret as possible, you head off much of the public outcry and it's much easier to get governments to illegally sign.

     

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  36.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Jan 26th, 2012 @ 1:25pm

    Re: Re: OT: MEP quits ACTA 'charade' in protest at EU signing

    Rapporteur = Reporter one that reports something or about something.

    That is what I always thought it meant, now I will go take a look at the dictionary to see what it really means LoL

     

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  37.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Jan 26th, 2012 @ 1:27pm

    Re: Re: OT: MEP quits ACTA 'charade' in protest at EU signing

     

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  38.  
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    jupiterkansas (profile), Jan 26th, 2012 @ 1:29pm

    Re: Are they really in the public's interest?

    Bob, I happen to be a creator, and I love copyright when it benefits the creator. I don't really see the point of protecting something 70 years after I'm dead. Perhaps it would be in the public interest to come up with reasonable copyright law that we can all respect.

    At what point does Big Content say "Enough, we have plenty of incentive to create and profit from our work." My guess is that will never happen.

    And there's no such thing as Big Search or Big Piracy, and I'm not sure what Big Hardware is or what it has to do with this.

     

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  39.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Jan 26th, 2012 @ 1:29pm

    Re: What I don't get

    3) both, they are mentally unstable crooks.

     

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  40.  
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    Richard (profile), Jan 26th, 2012 @ 1:32pm

    Re: Are they really in the public's interest?

    The CC license or any open source license get their strength
    from copyright.


    They are only needed because of copyright!

    Plus, as it says in the Bible, men only do things in secrecy because they know their deeds are evil.

    If the copyright lobby really believed that their case had morality behind it they woukd not feel the need for secrecy.

     

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  41.  
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    Richard (profile), Jan 26th, 2012 @ 1:34pm

    Re:

    I think the thing they learnt was that they weren't quite secret enough to avoid the thing being watered down (which it was to some extent). So they resolved to make sure nothing leaked out next time.

     

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  42.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Jan 26th, 2012 @ 1:43pm

    "For example, IP holders could restrict or stop importers from shipping merchandise such as DVDs and other related goods related to an anime or manga property into one country to protect local distribution of licensed merchandise already in the country via local licensors..." http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trans-Pacific_Strategic_Economic_Partnership#Controversy_over_Intellect ual_Property_.28IP.29_provisions

    There's your under 35 voters call to arms - "don't mess with my anime". This is a perfect example how these laws intend to control all creative content by not allowing "just anyone" to take part in creation. They want us to be couch potatoes.

    You Tube's biggest threat is it allows anyone to be creators. If I were given a choice between 100,000 videos that people voluntarly make to share vs. Hollywood's 10 block busters - I'll take You Tube. I doubt if I'm alone in that decision.

     

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  43.  
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    Loki, Jan 26th, 2012 @ 1:56pm

    Re:

    Now why would they pass an international version of OPEN, when the were unwilling to even discussion or consider OPEN itself?

    As for having some idea what it might say?
    Oh, I dunno.
    DCMA
    Pro IP
    SOPA
    PIPA
    ACTA

    Maybe, because, you know, they've established a precedent?

    Thank you for playing, but you earn a FAIL!

     

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  44.  
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    Loki, Jan 26th, 2012 @ 1:58pm

    Any rules negotiated in secret, without my awareness, ability to be represented, or ability to voice dissent, are not rules I feel any obligation to follow.

     

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  45.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Jan 26th, 2012 @ 2:11pm

    Re: Re: What I don't get

    To use special symbols you can use any of the various forms of UNICODE or HTML Entities(Web Browser agreed universal UNICODE symbols).

    Hexadecimal notation:
    &#x003c; = < (Less than sign)

    Decimal notation:
    &#60; = < (Less than sign)

    By name:
    &lt; = < (Less-then sign)

     

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  46.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Jan 26th, 2012 @ 2:14pm

    Re:

    People already know what they need.

    a) It comes from a deceptive bunch.
    b) Is about a monopoly control system(i.e. copyright and patents).
    c) It is being hidden from the public.
    d) Access to it is being denied.

     

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  47.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Jan 26th, 2012 @ 2:16pm

    Re: Are they really in the public's interest?

    What does any monopoly protects?

     

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  48.  
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    Mat, Jan 26th, 2012 @ 2:28pm

    Secret dealings:

    A basic rule of thumb:

    If you feel that you can't do it in the full view of the public, then you are feeling shame. Either because society thinks what you are doing is wierd...

    or what you are doing is wrong. I think I know which this qualifies as.

     

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  49.  
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    ChronoFish (profile), Jan 26th, 2012 @ 2:33pm

    I wonder if THIS is really it?

    You may have nailed it.

    Sure IP protection is part of it... but maybe it's really about creation. The Internet has become the distribution channel that anyone can utilize for virtually pennies. (probably 100% free if you tried hard enough).

    It may not be a truly concerted effort, but listen to how media "controllers" have tried to stem their "members" from using Twitter and keeping reporters from "blogging" (See MLB, NFL, Reuters, AP, etc).

    The democratization of publication is the real threat. Performers making (real) money without the need for record contracts or multi-million dollar tours / ad campaigns - wow - if that's not a threat to the recording industry.....

    Plus honest reviews, people getting what they want, when they want it - wow again. The media strong hold is really losing control. They can't control the message, the merchandise, nor the content. What is their reason for being? No wonder they are freaked out.

    -CF

     

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  50.  
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    The eejit (profile), Jan 26th, 2012 @ 2:49pm

    Re: Are they really in the public's interest?

    Says the guy who claims that everything's a paywall and that democracy is only for him when he wants it to be.

    There are a broad spectrum of opinions about IP laws: however, the MAFIAA and the IFPI have done more to harm that in the public eye than Google and TPB could in decades.

    When people fell entitled to money they shouldn't and take it, that's theft. That's happened in Canada for sure, and is winding its way through a number of other countries (through a "you must be a criminal" tax on blank media).

    Moreover, the EFF gets some money from Google, but it also gets money from the Bill Gates' Foundation, some from Apple and some from a lot of other companies. I'm pretty sure that all of Silicon Valley isn't the hive of scum and villainy you assume it to be.

     

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  51.  
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    The eejit (profile), Jan 26th, 2012 @ 2:54pm

    Re: Secret dealings:

    IT's weird and wrong. Like gore images.

     

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  52.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Jan 26th, 2012 @ 2:59pm

    Re:

    That would be great. But you are going to need a new species to accomplish that.

     

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  53.  
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    Dan (profile), Jan 26th, 2012 @ 3:58pm

    Re: Re: Re: The industy's assertion isn't wrong...unfortunately

    Ding! Ding! Ding! 1 smart point for AC #2

     

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  54.  
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    jlf65 (profile), Jan 26th, 2012 @ 4:48pm

    Re: Re: Secret dealings:

    Images of Al Gore as weird and wrong? I better take down my poster then.

     

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  55.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Jan 26th, 2012 @ 5:40pm

    What we should do

    So, any chance we can organize a large protest around the building beginning before the negotiations start, so that every negotiator entering can see?

    Simply ensure that the main protested point is the lack of transparency, and see if that weighs on their minds enough to get one of them to leak the proceedings.

     

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  56.  
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    That Anonymous Coward (profile), Jan 26th, 2012 @ 6:36pm

    Re: Re: Are they really in the public's interest?

    the name stuck! WOOT!

     

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  57.  
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    That Anonymous Coward (profile), Jan 26th, 2012 @ 6:40pm

    Re: Are they really in the public's interest?

    I'm sorry you said reputable newspapers... please provide evidence of this existing.

    I'm supposed to be getting paid for debunking you? WTF... MIKE WHERE'S MY MONEY!!!!!!!

    The interests of the public can not and will not be served when the machinations to meddle with them are done behind closed doors with no input from the public subject to the decisions.

    1/10 Paywall Bob gets points for spelling, now go play... in traffic.

     

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  58.  
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    That Anonymous Coward (profile), Jan 26th, 2012 @ 6:41pm

    Re: Re: Re: Secret dealings:

    No images of Tipper, rabidly foaming at the mouth trying to bite the 2 Live Crew.

     

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  59.  
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    That Anonymous Coward (profile), Jan 26th, 2012 @ 6:42pm

    Re: What we should do

    I'm sure they are prepared to have ICE agents move all of the protestors down to the Castro where the "Free Speech Zone" for this event has been designated.

     

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  60.  
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    rubberpants, Jan 26th, 2012 @ 6:51pm

    Re: Re: Are they really in the public's interest?

    Thanks for that.

    These people lost the ability to think about questions like that a long time ago though I'm afraid.

     

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  61.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Jan 26th, 2012 @ 7:03pm

    Re:

    So, what's in it then?

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  62.  
    identicon
    Rekrul, Jan 26th, 2012 @ 8:10pm

    Re: Secret dealings:

    If you feel that you can't do it in the full view of the public, then you are feeling shame.

    The entertainment industry doesn't feel shame. They hide these agreements because they feel that the public is made up of filthy thieves who would object to their absolute right to demand new laws that benefit only themselves.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  63.  
    identicon
    Anonymous Coward, Jan 26th, 2012 @ 8:15pm

    Re:

    Just read the IFPI wish list and you see why people should be worried specially when it is being done in complete secret without the input of affected parties like I dunno the public.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  64.  
    identicon
    Anonymous Coward, Jan 26th, 2012 @ 8:17pm

    Re: Re: What we should do

    Is a fucking shame that "free-speech zones" exist!

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  65.  
    icon
    LC (profile), Jan 26th, 2012 @ 8:26pm

    "Conspiracy theories are fun and all, but being a sane person, I tend to believe that the MPAA's and RIAA's of the world are doing what they genuinely feel is right for their constituents"

    While I don't believe that 9/11 was an inside job.
    While I don't believe UFOs and aliens are studied in Area 51.
    While I don't believe international banking corporations are behind a massive push for universal communism
    While I don't believe vaccines give people autism/allow governments to control your thoughts/whatever.
    While I don't believe chemtrails contain chemicals/biological agents purposely sprayed on the population by governments or other authorities.
    While I don't believe President Obama isn't a US citizen.
    While I don't believe the Moon Landing was done in a Hollywood studio.
    While I don't believe HIV/AIDS was created by the CIA in a laboratory
    I do believe that, if by "constituents" you mean the artists themselves, you couldn't be more wrong. The MPAA and the RIAA and their never ending expansion of copyright laws have not benefited artists in the slightest. Instead, they have only benefited themselves and an elite few big-wigs in Hollywood and the Recording Industry, not only through extra profits and bonuses to high ranking members such as Chris Dodd, but also by not having to update their redundant business models. In fact, the MPAA at least has been guilty of failing to protect the artists by sitting by silently and allowing dodgy Hollywood accounting to continue unchallenged.
    The **AA's are only in it for themselves. They are legalized protection rackets, nothing more.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  66.  
    identicon
    Anonymous Coward, Jan 26th, 2012 @ 10:34pm

    Re: What I don't get

    These bureaucracies always follow who is in power. Once they realize their current masters no longer have the power, the internet (democracy) does, they will come begging, just praying they keep their jobs.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  67.  
    identicon
    Anonymous Coward, Jan 26th, 2012 @ 10:41pm

    Re:

    Wake up and smell the internet.

    It's like that first whiff of coffee in the morning...

    That pretty girl standing next to you...

    A cool breeze in autumn...

    I can positivity say it doesn't smell like some prick trying to shove his junk in your face.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  68.  
    identicon
    Anonymous Coward, Jan 26th, 2012 @ 11:03pm

    Re: Are they really in the public's interest?

    Your right "Big Content" isn't evil. They can't figure out how to take advantage of the most incredible technological innovation mankind has ever invented. The internet connects EVERY FUCKING HUMAN ON THE PLANET!

    That's why I'm voting for "Little Content"...

    Maybe jerboa content...

    Or content that involves the intricacies or why I can't find my keys in the morning...

    Or Green Lantern 2...

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  69.  
    icon
    Idobek (profile), Jan 27th, 2012 @ 1:02am

    Re: Are they really in the public's interest?

    Google made its money and gained its power by supplying a superior product and not relying on government protection. Google relied entirely on the market (i.e. giving the customer what they want).

    For the last thirty years Hollywood has made its money by asking the government to protect and enforce its business model. They have no confidence in their product to they use force to get people to buy it. They gave up on the market and demanded a government enforced (and, therefore, artificial) monopoly.

    The public decided that Google was in the public interest.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  70.  
    icon
    That Anonymous Coward (profile), Jan 27th, 2012 @ 2:29am

    Re: Re: Re: What we should do

    but but but you might hurt the Presidents feelings, or show dissent infront of a camera... we can have none of that in our "free"* democracy.

    *free with purchase of 14 Congresscritters

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  71.  
    identicon
    Anonymous Coward, Jan 27th, 2012 @ 6:10am

    Re:

    You sir, are a true patriot to your government......its a shame your a traitor to its people

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  72.  
    identicon
    t.ferree, Jan 28th, 2012 @ 10:40pm

    Here's another conspiracy theory for you...

    I wouldn't be one bit surprized if Big Media have 15-20 of these "laws", "negotiations", "treaties", et al, national and international, sitting in a fat file somewhere, hoping 1 or 2 make it through.

    And, no, they are NOT protecting creators. After Ruppert Murdoch made his infamous tweets, someone replied asking if Mr. Murdoch would send artists, directors, and screen writers some of those jobs and money their way.

    I'm seeing more and more creators turn to the internet to make the money Big Media are not paying them. Louis CK is one. James Altucher on Techcrunch just posted how he self-published his second book, selling on Amazon. So, if you think of it that way, I could see how they might be worried.

    Except that they are making sooooo much money without these laws, despite people using the internet, that it DOESN'T make sense.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  73.  
    icon
    Karl (profile), Jan 29th, 2012 @ 1:56pm

    Re: Are they really in the public's interest?

    The EFF is funded by Google's charity.

    The EFF predates Google by nearly a decade. The EFF was founded in 1990, Google in 1998.

    Furthermore, the EFF's Annual Report (PDF) lists a number of companies and foundations that gave them money (on page 15). Google is not among them. In fact, not a single search engine is, as far as I can tell.

    Their funding sources, from greatest to least, are: membership income; foundation grants; individual major donations; corporate contributions; and litigation. (There are more, but these are the only sources that gave the EFF more than $100,000.) Total corporate contributions account for less than 15% of the EFF's funding.

    The idea that the EFF is a "front" for Google (or any other "Big Search" company) is an outright, bald-faced lie. You should be ashamed of yourself.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]


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