Reporter Claims TSA Agent Would Speed People Through Security For $10

from the feeling-safer dept

Phil Mushnick at the NYPost has an article telling about his own recent experience flying out of Newark, in which a TSA agent appeared to let people cut to the front of the security line for a "tip" of around $10. The actual amount wasn't entirely clear, other than that she got quite upset -- publicly -- when only given $5. Basically, she walked around offering people a wheelchair, which she would use to bring them to the front of the line, the whole time letting them know that she expected something in return.

Of course, the TSA at Newark has a bit of a history of problems. In just the past two years, a TSA agent was arrested for avoiding security. A TSA supervisor was arrested for working with another TSA agent to steal money from passengers, and just a few months after that, another TSA agent was arrested for stealing $500 from a wheelchair-bound passenger.

All of this makes you wonder if the TSA is really making us safer... or exactly the opposite. If TSA agents are looking for the next opportunity to make or steal a dollar, rather than keeping people and planes safe, it would suggest that we've got a problem.


Reader Comments (rss)

(Flattened / Threaded)

  1.  
    icon
    The eejit (profile), Sep 13th, 2011 @ 8:23am

    And we thought the Russians were corrupt.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  2.  
    identicon
    HothMonster, Sep 13th, 2011 @ 8:54am

    This is fine, Terrorists do not have the means to acquire 10 dollars or bribe people, security theater works damnit.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  3.  
    identicon
    RD, Sep 13th, 2011 @ 8:55am

    Good Ol' Newark

    Good ol' Newark. Thats New Jersey for you, the armpit of America. Only Detroit is worse, and even then sometimes they flip flop for #1 and #2 worst places in America.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  4.  
    identicon
    Anonymous Coward, Sep 13th, 2011 @ 9:02am

    Appropriate sentence

    In a sane world —in a sane America— this corruption would be stopped. This —small middle-aged woman— would be tried and convicted. And sentenced.

    What would be an appropriate sentence?

    Ten years in jail seems utterly out-of-line. That's crazy. It's out of proportion to what she did.

    Six months in jail seems about right to me. Not over a year. In other words, a misdemeanor.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  5.  
    identicon
    Anonymous Coward, Sep 13th, 2011 @ 9:13am

    Check Out

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  6.  
    icon
    davebarnes (profile), Sep 13th, 2011 @ 9:16am

    The T in TSA

    stands for Trailer Trash.
    What do you expect?

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  7.  
    identicon
    Anonymous Coward, Sep 13th, 2011 @ 9:17am

    One bad apple, let's get out the broadbrush and get to work.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  8.  
    icon
    PlagueSD (profile), Sep 13th, 2011 @ 9:18am

    Re: Appropriate sentence

    Accepting bribes to bypass airport security could be seen as an act of treason by some over-zealous lawyers. What's the penalty for treason again??

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  9.  
    icon
    fogbugzd (profile), Sep 13th, 2011 @ 9:18am

    Being a TSA agent is a really rotten job. As an actor in the great Security Theater production the agents are forced to inflict demeaning, intrusive, and mostly meaningless procedures on their fellow citizens. And for that they get paid as little as the TSA can get away with paying.

    My solution would be to implement a rational and effective screening system. Among other benefits, it would cut down greatly on the amount of time it takes to screen passengers and that would allow TSA to not hire as many agents. They would also be able to get rid of a lot of expensive hardware like body scanners that are not really very effective. TSA probably wouldn't actually have to lay off any agents because the turnover is extremely high. TSA could use the money saved to increase the salaries of the remaining personnel to a living wage.

    If TSA agents felt like they were doing something useful and if they were receiving reasonable wages they would not be as likely to risk their job for a $10 tip.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  10.  
    icon
    Bob V (profile), Sep 13th, 2011 @ 9:20am

    Re: Re: Appropriate sentence

    or sadly just business as usual in new jersey. The culture of corruption runs deep at all levels of the government through out the state.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  11.  
    identicon
    Nom, Sep 13th, 2011 @ 9:22am

    You know, most of the time I find that Mike Masnick makes good points, and I am not a fan of the TSA's "security". But I feel a need to call Mike out on this one.

    Stop using a fallacy of composition.

    Let me break this down, if for nothing else than to make both my argument, and your potential fallacy clear:

    All of this makes you wonder if the TSA is really making us safer... or exactly the opposite. If TSA agents are looking for the next opportunity to make or steal a dollar, rather than keeping people and planes safe, it would suggest that we've got a problem.


    The fallacy that I am seeing is that you are apparently attributing the misdeeds of the TSA in Newark to that of the whole of the TSA.

    I can agree that the TSA at Newark are a problem as they have repeatedly shown this unscrupulous behavior, however that does not necessary extend to all areas in which the TSA operate.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  12.  
    identicon
    James Whiteside, Sep 13th, 2011 @ 9:24am

    Re: Check Out

    Wow buddy, you're going to get in trouble now. That document you linked to stinks of sedition. I believe under today's laws you are guilty of treason. The FBI or Homeland Security will soon be at your house. RUN! GET AWAY! RUN!

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  13.  
    identicon
    Zot-Sindi, Sep 13th, 2011 @ 9:31am

    T.S.A. = Terrorist Squad of America

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  14.  
    icon
    Harrekki (profile), Sep 13th, 2011 @ 9:31am

    Re:

    this would be a valid point..... if there haven't been other issues with TSA at other airports. I'd love to see a report on how many actual "events" the TSA have stopped.

    If you claim that the enhanced security that the TSA provides is to deter people from thinking about attacks, that's fine. But that's security theater. Call it as it is. Say that security theater makes you feel safer, and you think it's enough of a cozy feeling to violate passengers privacy.
    It's not a bad thing, but just say it. People need to stop pretending that the prevention of imaginary events have a valid point in this discussion.

    I would also like to know if by placing people of a non-disabled nature in a wheelchair, they violated some kind of ADA - anti abuse measure? I imagine with so many people complaining about people abusing ADA laws that there has to be some kind of penalty for taking money in an official position to fake an allowance give to those with disabilities.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  15.  
    icon
    Sage (profile), Sep 13th, 2011 @ 9:31am

    Re:

    And how many "exceptions" does it take to become the "rule"?

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  16.  
    identicon
    Anonymous Coward, Sep 13th, 2011 @ 9:41am

    Re:

    Right. But it's the fact that if the corruption occurs at Newark's TSA it could be present elsewhere (unless you think there's something in Jersey's air/water that encourages corruption). I believe he's pointing to the fact that it exemplifies the fact that it is security theater. If I can get one agent to let me cut to the front of the line there could be another agent that's on harder times that would let my bag go around the scanner. It could be horrible and treasonous, and very unlikely. But we're putting all of our faith in a government organization that appears to have communication problems (such as stating one thing and doing another) and potential/historical questionable actions.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  17.  
    identicon
    Lord Binky, Sep 13th, 2011 @ 9:42am

    It doesn't matter if it was just one person.

    The whole purpose of all the extra procedures is for "increased security" or the appearance of it to some special people. When you have problems with your security this blatant, it is akin to having a 10 meter thick brick wall that disappears into the sky, while leaving an entrance open with a single guard that is asleep. For security, one opening compromises the entirety, so for a security agency, one bad checkpoint compromises the entire system, which does not get fixed by ratcheting up security everywhere excluding your problem areas.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  18.  
    identicon
    Anonymous Coward, Sep 13th, 2011 @ 9:42am

    Re: Re:

    Mike likes to play the broadbrush game when it suits him, and this is a great example.

    TSA has thousands of agents in airports all over the city. The corrupt actions of a single agent in Newark are not an indication of the standards and practices of the rest of them. IN fact, I would say it's pretty insulting to the rest of the agents to get this sort of a broadbrush.

    I am actually starting to wonder if Mike isn't trying to bait someone from the TSA into a lawsuit, because his comments are starting to get awfully close to the line.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  19.  
    identicon
    Anonymous Coward, Sep 13th, 2011 @ 9:44am

    Re: Re: Appropriate sentence

    What's the penalty for treason again??


    Incomplete, but fun information from Wikipedia --

    In English law, high treason was punishable by being hanged, drawn and quartered (men) or burnt at the stake (women), or beheading (royalty and nobility).


    Separately, in the U.S. --

    "whoever, owing allegiance to the United States, levies war against them or adheres to their enemies, giving them aid and comfort within the United States or elsewhere, is guilty of treason and shall suffer death, or shall be imprisoned not less than five years and fined under this title but not less than $10,000; and shall be incapable of holding any office under the United States."

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  20.  
    icon
    DH's Love Child (profile), Sep 13th, 2011 @ 9:45am

    Re:

    If you don't see how a SERIOUS breach of security at a major airport doesn't translate to TSA making us all less safe, you're either an idiot or an apologist.

    So, I'll spell it out for you: Once they know they can bribe TSA at this airport, they can get their bombs, etc to ANY other airport. This little insignificant detail makes air travel less safe for everyone due to the actions of the TSA. Get it now?

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  21.  
    icon
    ChurchHatesTucker (profile), Sep 13th, 2011 @ 9:48am

    Re:

    The fallacy that I am seeing is that you are apparently attributing the misdeeds of the TSA in Newark to that of the whole of the TSA.

    You're right. Newark's TSA has a lot of catching up to do.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  22.  
    icon
    Jay (profile), Sep 13th, 2011 @ 9:48am

    Re:

    Have you read some of the older stories about the TSA security theater?

    The problem is with a federalized group that have a lot of incentives to impede on people's civil rights. It doesn't matter if they're the elderly or a child

    They ignore actual security protocols to grope you, trying to take their theater nationwide

    This isn't just a problem in only Newark, it's a problem with the system.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  23.  
    identicon
    Anonymous Coward, Sep 13th, 2011 @ 9:50am

    Re: Re: Check Out

    It's Ok, I'm visiting friends in China.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  24.  
    icon
    Dark Helmet (profile), Sep 13th, 2011 @ 9:58am

    Re: Re: Appropriate sentence

    "What's the penalty for treason again??"

    I'm pretty sure the penalty is a position as Vice President, judging by how the last several administrations have handled it, but I could be wrong....

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  25.  
    identicon
    Nom, Sep 13th, 2011 @ 9:58am

    Re: Re:

    Technically? A majority (>50%), that is when the exceptions become attempting to protect the people instead of extorting them. Ideally, the problem with various TSA groups should be dealt with before it gets close to that point. Hopefully, by internal regulation that carries strict punishment for abusing members.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  26.  
    icon
    Dark Helmet (profile), Sep 13th, 2011 @ 10:03am

    Re: Re: Re:

    "Hopefully, by internal regulation that carries strict punishment for abusing members."

    Uh huh. This is a government job and I believe the TSA are unionized, so best of luck on that one....

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  27.  
    identicon
    Nom, Sep 13th, 2011 @ 10:07am

    Re: Re:

    I am well aware that the TSA will violate people's civil rights, as well as the shortcomings of the system they are using. However, both those things are outside the scope of this argument. This argument is focused on TSA extorting people for personal gain.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  28.  
    icon
    Harrekki (profile), Sep 13th, 2011 @ 10:07am

    For the record, the FBI is now saying that a TSA screener worked with police from New York, Florida, and Connecticut to ship tens of thousands of Oxy pills.
    http://www.courant.com/community/stamford/hc-stamford-tsa-drug-arrests-0914-20110913,0,29224 80.story

    So, still think it's just Newark who has security issues? there's 3 different airports, in different states, who have a security issue.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  29.  
    identicon
    Keep It Simple Stupid, Sep 13th, 2011 @ 10:11am

    stereotyping

    There's an issue with TSA Newark (albeit again) and suddenly TSA everywhere else is to blame? Are you freaking kidding me?

    So if one teacher is charged with child molestation, does that mean all teachers get blacklisted as child molestors? If one caucasian male kills his coworkers and eats their remains, does that mean all caucasian males are closet-cannibals? If one Chinese person is a Communist, does that mean anyone Chinese is a Communist?

    Let's not be so irresponsible (and ignorant) to go so far as to generalize things into stereotypes. Keep this sh!t simple. Apparently, there are issues with some of the employees at TSA Newark.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  30.  
    identicon
    Anonymous Coward, Sep 13th, 2011 @ 10:13am

    Re:

    One bad apple? He gave three other examples. Talk about distorting numbers. From four to one. Nice try troll.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  31.  
    icon
    Berenerd (profile), Sep 13th, 2011 @ 10:15am

    Re:

    Umm...so the fact that several proven corrupt has come from that airport, means its just 1 bad apple? Who is the bad apple? The head of the TSA? Who ever is hiring these people?

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  32.  
    icon
    ComputerAddict (profile), Sep 13th, 2011 @ 10:31am

    I think just about everyone missed the boat on this one. The $10 did not get you PAST security, I merely bumped people to the front of the line. The people that paid STILL WENT THROUGH SECURITY.

    Other than that the arguments seem to be on target that TSA as a whole fails to accomplish anything. Wake me up when Someone bribes TSA to SKIP security

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  33.  
    icon
    ComputerAddict (profile), Sep 13th, 2011 @ 10:35am

    Re:

    In this case, It's like having Priority Boarding, just instead of getting on the plane, your getting into the gate.

    It's not right, but it doesn't make us 'less' safe. I think TSA already hit bottom on that one.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  34.  
    identicon
    Nom, Sep 13th, 2011 @ 10:40am

    Re: Re:

    My my, what a nasty tone. I'm not sure to what I would be an apologist. I wonder why you hold such venom. Oh well.

    I am not trying to downplay the seriousness of this kind of breach. The seriousness is obvious. This is in addition to several other security problems the TSA has. The fact is that these kinds of problems need to be addressed.

    What I am doing is pointing out a fallacy in Mike's argument which inherently weakens it.

    While multiple TSA agents in Newark have repeatedly shown themselves to take money from passengers, this does not show that this corruption is inherent to the TSA as a whole.

    Likewise, just because I can bribe a few police of a certain town, that does not mean that the police in every town in the state will accept bribes.

    In both scenarios, the offending parties need to be punished, and the abusers purged from the system.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  35.  
    icon
    DH's Love Child (profile), Sep 13th, 2011 @ 10:45am

    Re: Re: Re: Appropriate sentence

    I'm not sure whether to vote funny or insightful on this one.. so I went with both.

    Well done father!

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  36.  
    identicon
    rubberpants, Sep 13th, 2011 @ 11:02am

    Re: Re: Re:

    The next time you bring out your push broom I'll be sure to remember this. Cheers!

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  37.  
    icon
    Atkray (profile), Sep 13th, 2011 @ 11:04am

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Appropriate sentence

    The lack of an "Oh smeg" button strikes again.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  38.  
    icon
    NSILMike (profile), Sep 13th, 2011 @ 11:04am

    TSA officers arrested on drug charges in Conn.

    From bad to worse...

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  39.  
    icon
    Atkray (profile), Sep 13th, 2011 @ 11:06am

    Re: Re:

    I thought the bad apple was across the Hudson river...

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  40.  
    icon
    Rikuo (profile), Sep 13th, 2011 @ 11:08am

    Re: Re: Re:

    Why not bait them into a lawsuit? He coined the term Streisand Effect after all...might as well use it.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  41.  
    icon
    Rikuo (profile), Sep 13th, 2011 @ 11:11am

    Re: stereotyping

    "So if one teacher is charged with child molestation, does that mean all teachers get blacklisted as child molestors?"

    Just like when that law was introduced a few weeks back banning teachers from friending students on Facebook?

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  42.  
    identicon
    MM_Dandy, Sep 13th, 2011 @ 11:15am

    Re: Re: Appropriate sentence

    The wording used in the article was "moving them to the front of the line." I'm not sure that is the same as 'bypassing security.'

    However, it does beg the question: if $10 is enough to get me to the front of the line, what does $100 get me?

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  43.  
    icon
    BeeAitch (profile), Sep 13th, 2011 @ 11:24am

    Re: Re: Re: Re:

    ...and I was expecting a joke about "abusing members"...

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  44.  
    identicon
    MM_Dandy, Sep 13th, 2011 @ 11:33am

    Re: Re: Re:

    The article makes it pretty clear that this wasn't a single agent acting alone. Nearly all the action took place in view of other agents, who did nothing, and appeared to behave as though it were normal.

    And, as others have pointed out, this is hardly an isolated incident - I think we're well past the point where anyone might argue that it's a "few bad apples." It's a broken system that needs to be fixed.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  45.  
    identicon
    Anonymous Coward, Sep 13th, 2011 @ 12:12pm

    Re:

    You see corruption is something that tarnishes the whole of an institution not only the corrupt people and if it becomes endemic you can bet that it will fall sooner or later.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  46.  
    identicon
    Anonymous Coward, Sep 13th, 2011 @ 12:14pm

    Re: Re: Re:

    There is no fallacy, if the grunts that do all the real work are not doing their work people are not safe, besides this is not an isolated case, maybe it is very visible only there but if you look elsewhere there are other problems.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  47.  
    identicon
    Anonymous Coward, Sep 13th, 2011 @ 12:16pm

    Re: Re: Re:

    Don't try to limit the problems that the TSA has to only one point, corruption is clear at this time and in other places there are very serious problems with procedure.

    Which translates to a crystal clear picture to everybody who wants to see it.

    The TSA management can't manage anything.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  48.  
    identicon
    Anonymous Coward, Sep 13th, 2011 @ 12:22pm

    TSA or as I like to say "Tough Shit Asshole"

    Problem Number One, Low pay with poor training.

    Problem Number Two, Federalized Employees.

    Problem Number Three, They are unionized.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  49.  
    icon
    btrussell (profile), Sep 13th, 2011 @ 12:23pm

    Re: Re: Re:

    "Likewise, just because I can bribe a few police of a certain town, that does not mean that the police in every town in the state will accept bribes."
    http://boingboing.net/2011/09/13/tsa-workers-trafficked-oxycontin-other-illegal-prescripti on-drugs-for-cash.html?

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  50.  
    identicon
    Anonymous Coward, Sep 13th, 2011 @ 12:28pm

    Re: Re: Re: Appropriate sentence

    what does $100 get me?

    A (not) free hand job.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  51.  
    icon
    el_segfaulto (profile), Sep 13th, 2011 @ 12:42pm

    Re: Re: Re:

    Just because I find a few termites in my crawlspace doesn't mean my entire house is riddled with them...but I still have to behave as though they were and deal with the problem by calling in an exterminator.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  52.  
    identicon
    Anonymous Coward, Sep 13th, 2011 @ 1:21pm

    Re: Re: Re:

    The corrupt actions of a single agent in Newark are not an indication of the standards and practices of the rest of them.

    TSA corruption hasn't been limited to a single agent in Newark, my little apologist friend. Even in this particular case, one has to wonder why the other TSA in the area let it go on. It really makes you wonder if maybe they were all taking turns at it.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  53.  
    identicon
    Anonymous Coward, Sep 13th, 2011 @ 1:27pm

    Re: Re: Re: Appropriate sentence

    An "enhanced" pat-down

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  54.  
    icon
    John Fenderson (profile), Sep 13th, 2011 @ 1:29pm

    Re: Re:

    Say that security theater makes you feel safer, and you think it's enough of a cozy feeling to violate passengers privacy.
    It's not a bad thing, but just say it.


    But it IS a bad thing, and this is the heart of how the TSA actually makes us much less safe. Any security professional will tell you of one of the fundamental truths of the game: the illusion of security puts you in more danger than the obvious lack of security does. If you think you're safe, you aren't on your guard. Therefore if you think you're safe when you're not, you are at even greater risk.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  55.  
    identicon
    Anonymous Coward, Sep 13th, 2011 @ 1:41pm

    Re: Re: Re: Appropriate sentence

    The wording used in the article was "moving them to the front of the line." I'm not sure that is the same as 'bypassing security.'

    TSA agents supposedly observe and scrutinize people while standing in line. Less time in line means less scrutiny.


    However, it does beg the question: if $10 is enough to get me to the front of the line, what does $100 get me?

    Don't know, but $150 per year will get you a membership in TSA's Trusted Traveler Program and let you "officially" bypass the long lines.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  56.  
    identicon
    Michael, Sep 13th, 2011 @ 1:46pm

    Wow I got screwed. I paid $20 at New Orleans.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  57.  
    identicon
    Anonymous Coward, Sep 13th, 2011 @ 1:52pm

    Re: Re: Re:

    Likewise, just because I can bribe a few police of a certain town, that does not mean that the police in every town in the state will accept bribes.

    Exactly, and a few more examples. Just because some Mexican police and other officials may be corrupt, that does not mean that corruption is rampant in Mexico. Or just because some Nazis were bad, that does not mean they all were. Same thing with members of various gangs. People should stop using such broad brushes.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  58.  
    identicon
    Anonymous Coward, Sep 13th, 2011 @ 1:57pm

    Re: Re: Re:

    My my, what a nasty tone. I'm not sure to what I would be an apologist. I wonder why you hold such venom. Oh well.

    If you go around acting and sounding like an apologist, don't be surprised if someone thinks you are one.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  59.  
    identicon
    Anonymous Coward, Sep 13th, 2011 @ 2:05pm

    Re:

    I think just about everyone missed the boat on this one. The $10 did not get you PAST security, I merely bumped people to the front of the line. The people that paid STILL WENT THROUGH SECURITY.

    Standing in line is part of the security process where TSA agents can scrutinize people's behavior while waiting in line. Bypassing the line is bypassing part of the security process.

    Wake me up when Someone bribes TSA to SKIP security

    Wake up.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  60.  
    identicon
    Anonymous Coward, Sep 13th, 2011 @ 2:09pm

    Wheelchair?

    Why would someone in a wheelchair get to go to the front of the line? They're already sitting down.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  61.  
    identicon
    Anonymous Coward, Sep 13th, 2011 @ 2:16pm

    Re: stereotyping

    Let's not be so irresponsible (and ignorant) to go so far as to generalize things into stereotypes. Keep this sh!t simple. Apparently, there are issues with some of the employees at TSA Newark.

    Agreed. Everyone, please ignore this story. One turd in the punch bowl doesn't ruin the whole bowl.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  62.  
    icon
    DH's Love Child (profile), Sep 13th, 2011 @ 2:26pm

    Re:

    But if they take a bribe to get someone through security faster, how do we know they got any kind of actual scrutiny when they went through? maybe their bags went right through the scanner without so much as a glance

    Just because they went through security, doesn't mean they got any sort of screening.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  63.  
    identicon
    mesome, Sep 13th, 2011 @ 2:37pm

    Fact checking?

    Well over at the TSA Blog they're saying it wasn't one of their agents.

    "I and others more familiar with airports and checkpoint security instantly knew this wasn’t a TSO, but to be sure, we reviewed the video. What we found was that the person he wrote about was a skycap. Skycaps are porters who assist passengers, some often in wheelchairs. They work for tips and their uniforms do not resemble those of a TSO. In fact, many skycaps wear hats as TSOs do not."

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  64.  
    identicon
    ddd, Sep 13th, 2011 @ 2:40pm

    How could have forgotten about this Newark airport Klepto?

    http://www.nypress.com/article-22424-to-serve-to-protect-andto-steal.html

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  65.  
    identicon
    Anonymous Howard, Cowering, Sep 13th, 2011 @ 2:54pm

    Re: AC #7

    One bad apple, let's get out the broadbrush and get to work.

    That's exactly the reaction Al-Qaeda got ten years ago.
    And what the wanna-be shoe- and underwear-bombers got after their otherwise ineffective attempts.

    Are you saying the U.S. Government is WRONG?!?

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  66.  
    identicon
    Anonymous Coward, Sep 13th, 2011 @ 3:12pm

    TSA says woman is not TSA employee

    The TSA states on their TSA blog that the “small middle-aged woman wearing a TSA (Transportation Security Administration) uniform” reportedly accepting bribes was not a TSA employee.

    No Scams Here, Just a Technical Foul

    A sports columnist recently wrote that a Transportation Security Officer (TSO) was offering to take people to the front of the checkpoint line via a wheelchair for a fee. Of course, his story picked up a bit of attention on the ol’ intertubes.

    I and others more familiar with airports and checkpoint security instantly knew this wasn’t a TSO, but to be sure, we reviewed the video. What we found was that the person he wrote about was a skycap. Skycaps are porters who assist passengers, some often in wheelchairs. They work for tips and their uniforms do not resemble those of a TSO. In fact, many skycaps wear hats as TSOs do not.

    [...more...]


    Via “TSA Debunks Scam Reported By New York Post Columnist”, by Carlton Purvis, Security Managment, Sept 13, 2011.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  67.  
    identicon
    Anonymous Coward, Sep 13th, 2011 @ 4:42pm

    Re: Fact checking?

    According to Phil Mushnick's New York Daily Post story, the woman was very definitely wearing a TSA uniform.

    Paragraph 4:
    a small middle-aged woman wearing a TSA (Transportation Security Administration) uniform

    Paragraph 8:
    the woman in the TSA uniform

    Paragraph 11:
    It was clear: I was paying off a uniformed TSA worker officer for privileged access.


    Paragraph 13:
    As we stepped through the scanner, our TSA wheel-woman was waiting on the other side.


    Page 2:

    Paragraph 15 (continuing numbers from page 1):
    this one TSA servicewoman


    Paragraph 16:
    TSA woman, her uniform, her position and the public trust


    Paragraph 17:
    uniformed airport security officer


    Further, at several points in the story, Mushnick refers to other uniformed TSA personnel. That is, he should be able to contrast this woman's uniform with the uniform of the other screeners.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  68.  
    identicon
    Michael, Sep 13th, 2011 @ 4:47pm

    Re:

    He actually pointed out several bad apples, and he isn't even digging into the pile of crap that has surfaced in the TSA lately.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  69.  
    icon
    btrussell (profile), Sep 14th, 2011 @ 2:32am

    Re: TSA says woman is not TSA employee

    I understand OxyContin can dim your vision.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  70.  
    identicon
    AJBarnes, Sep 14th, 2011 @ 6:48am

    Those..

    Those who would trade security for freedom deserve neither.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  71.  
    identicon
    MM_Dandy, Sep 14th, 2011 @ 9:58am

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Appropriate sentence

    TSA agents supposedly observe and scrutinize people while standing in line. Less time in line means less scrutiny.

    I disagree. If this were true, we'd see levels of screening based on behavior and appearance. Instead, we see children and elderly subjected to the same screening as everyone else.

    And in this case, all of the action took place in view of other agents. An obvious act of bribery should have raised red flags and they should have been treated as suspicious individuals. Yet, the agents showed no signs of even acknowledging the bribery, and they were subjected to the same screening to which everyone else in line was subjected.

    ...$150 a year will get you a membership in TSA's Trusted Traveler Program and let you "officially" bypass the long lines.

    If I'm going to be up to no good, I wouldn't sign up for the program, anyway. I'd just bribe one or more TSA agents for the same or better benefit without having to subject to the background check.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  72.  
    identicon
    msmii, Sep 15th, 2011 @ 7:42am

    Alright, so they are NOT what was intended. How many billions of dollars go into this sluggish, nepotistic, thieving, and jackbooted wanna-be agents each year? According to a Homeland Security Newswire article the 2011 proposed budget was $43.6 BILLION dollars. No terrorist acts caught at the gate for a price tag of $43.6 billion dollars just this year and our personal as well as national dignity is all it costs.
    http://msmignoresit.blogspot.com/2011/09/airport-screening-statistics.html

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  73.  
    identicon
    Adam V, Sep 15th, 2011 @ 8:02am

    Re: Fact checking?

    Easy to fix - post the video evidence on YouTube and let us decide for ourselves.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  74.  
    identicon
    Ryan Tuscano, Oct 1st, 2011 @ 1:41am

    This article is completely false, I work as Air Marshall at EWR The person who push the wheelchair to front of the line was a skycap. TSA is require my law to allow disables to cut the line mandate by disables rights act. Here's link to back story up. http://www.securitymanagement.com/news/tsa-debunks-scam-reported-new-york-post-columnist-009018

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  75.  
    identicon
    Letting Agents Middlesbrough, Nov 17th, 2011 @ 1:20am

    What is the full form of TSA?

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]


Add Your Comment

Have a Techdirt Account? Sign in now. Want one? Register here
Get Techdirt’s Daily Email
Save me a cookie
  • Note: A CRLF will be replaced by a break tag (<br>), all other allowable HTML will remain intact
  • Allowed HTML Tags: <b> <i> <a> <em> <br> <strong> <blockquote> <hr> <tt>
Follow Techdirt
A word from our sponsors...
Essential Reading
Techdirt Reading List
Techdirt Insider Chat
A word from our sponsors...
Recent Stories
A word from our sponsors...

Close

Email This