The 18 Senators Who Approve Breaking The Internet To Protect Hollywood

from the not-cool dept

Last fall, we noted that the Senate Judiciary Committee had unanimously voted to approve COICA, a bill for censoring the internet as a favor to the entertainment industry. Thankfully, Senator Ron Wyden stepped up and blocked COICA from progressing. This year, COICA has been replaced by the PROTECT IP Act, which fixes some of the problems of COICA, but introduces significant other problems as well. A wide cross section of people who actually understand technology and innovation have come out against PROTECT IP as written -- including librarians, human rights groups, public interest groups (pdf) and various technology groups (pdf), including CEA, CCIA and NetCoalition. Most significantly, a group of internet/DNS specialists have made a strong case that this would break the internet in significant ways:
  • The U.S. Government and private industry have identified Internet security and stability as a key part of a wider cyber security strategy, and if implemented, the DNS related provisions of PROTECT IP would weaken this important commitment. DNS filters would be evaded easily, and would likely prove ineffective at reducing online infringement. Further, widespread circumvention would threaten the security and stability of the global DNS.
  • The DNS provisions would undermine the universality of domain names, which has been one of the key enablers of the innovation, economic growth, and improvements in communications and information access unleashed by the global Internet.
  • Migration away from ISP-provided DNS servers would harm efforts that rely on DNS data to detect and mitigate security threats and improve network performance.
  • Dependencies within the DNS would pose significant risk of collateral damage, with filtering of one domain potentially affecting users' ability to reach non-infringing Internet content.
  • The site redirection envisioned in Section 3(d)(II)(A)(ii) is inconsistent with security extensions to the DNS that are known as DNSSEC.
  • The U.S. Government and private industry have identified DNSSEC as a key part of a wider cyber security strategy, and many private, military, and governmental networks have invested in DNSSEC technologies.
  • If implemented, this section of the PROTECT IP Act would weaken this important effort to improve Internet security. It would enshrine and institutionalize the very network manipulation that DNSSEC must fight in order to prevent cyberattacks and other malevolent behavior on the global Internet, thereby exposing networks and users to increased security and privacy risks.
So, with the people who actually understand this stuff pointing out that PROTECT IP would break the internet and go against various stated important priorities for the internet, you would think that the Senate Judiciary Committee might hold off before moving forward with such a poorly thought out bill.

But, you know, the Hollywood lobbyists want it. So, let's just ignore the people who actually understand this stuff and give Hollywood what they want.

This morning the Senate Judiciary Committee unanimously voted to move forward with PROTECT IP as is. It seems only fair to once again name the Senators who just voted (with a voice vote) to break the internet. Here's your list of technologically ignorant lawmakers of the day:
  • Patrick J. Leahy -- Vermont
  • Herb Kohl -- Wisconsin
  • Jeff Sessions -- Alabama
  • Dianne Feinstein -- California
  • Orrin G. Hatch -- Utah
  • Richard Blumenthal -- Connecticut
  • Chuck Grassley -- Iowa
  • Michael Lee -- Utah
  • Jon Kyl -- Arizona
  • Chuck Schumer -- New York
  • Lindsey Graham -- South Carolina
  • Dick Durbin -- Illinois
  • John Cornyn -- Texas
  • Tom Coburn -- Oklahoma
  • Sheldon Whitehouse -- Rhode Island
  • Amy Klobuchar -- Minnesota
  • Al Franken -- Minnesota
  • Chris Coons -- Delaware
Update: Oops. Pulled last year's list. Just corrected, removing Feingold, Specter and Cardin and adding in Lee and Blumenthal. Sorry, that was a dumb mistake.


Reader Comments (rss)

(Flattened / Threaded)

  •  
    identicon
    hegemon13, May 26th, 2011 @ 10:29am

    Leahy is a hypocrite

    Apparently, it's okay to grant unconstitutional powers to the government, as long as it benefits Hollywood. Within a few days hours, he loses the respect I had for his opposition to National Security Letters earlier this week. Clearly, it was neither the people, nor the Constitution that he was worried about.

     

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  •  
    icon
    Hephaestus (profile), May 26th, 2011 @ 10:34am

    I just finished reading that bill

    God, what a horrible piece of legislation.

     

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  •  
    identicon
    Josh Taylor, May 26th, 2011 @ 10:35am

    Until the next day, it will be okay to make it unconstitutionally mandatory to have DRM-thought police chips implanted in the brains of Americans just in case we try to criticize the govt or corporate businesses in real reality even if you're not on the internet.

    Repent and ask Jesus for forgiveness.

     

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  •  
    icon
    pixelpusher220 (profile), May 26th, 2011 @ 10:39am

    Talk about unconstitutional

    Russ Feingold voted for this thing today? He's not even in the Senate anymore... ;-P

     

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  •  
    identicon
    Anonymous Coward, May 26th, 2011 @ 10:40am

    Am I the only one here who notices that the US government is acting like malware?

     

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  •  
    icon
    Pickle Monger (profile), May 26th, 2011 @ 10:40am

    Feingold lost reelection and is therefore no longer a US Senator

     

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  •  
    identicon
    Eric Jaffa, May 26th, 2011 @ 10:41am

    That must be an old list of Senators.

    Russ Feingold isn't currently a Senator.

     

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    •  
      icon
      Mike Masnick (profile), May 26th, 2011 @ 10:50am

      Re:

      That must be an old list of Senators.

      Russ Feingold isn't currently a Senator.


      Yes, accidentally (and stupidly) pulled last year's list. Updated.

       

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    •  
      identicon
      Anonymous Coward, May 26th, 2011 @ 11:43am

      Re:

      Masnick got so upset about piracy legislation that in his rush to fear-monger, he couldn't even get the names of the Senators right.

      Classic.

      "break the internet"

      LOL.

      Really Masnick? Really? Break the internet?

      What a ginormous douchenozzle you are.

       

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      •  
        icon
        Josh in CharlotteNC (profile), May 26th, 2011 @ 12:08pm

        Re: Re:

        Masnick got so upset about civil rights violating unconstitutional legislation that in his rush to inform the public, he cut and paste the wrong list.

        FTFY.

        Break the internet?

        I suppose you know more about DNS than a group of people who work with it every day for a living?

        Authors: Steve Crocker, Shinkuro, Inc.
        David Dagon, Georgia Tech
        Dan Kaminsky, DKH
        Danny McPherson, Verisign, Inc.
        Paul Vixie, Internet Systems Consortium

        Your credentials? Put up or shut up.

         

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      •  
        icon
        techflaws.org (profile), May 26th, 2011 @ 11:26pm

        Re: Re:

        What a ginormous douchenozzle you are.

        It's like you don't even try anymore.

         

        reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

  •  
    identicon
    Jared Fulgham, May 26th, 2011 @ 10:42am

    Hatch

    I am sad and ashamed that Orrin Hatch represents my home state. What a mistake that he is still in. That won't last much longer though.

     

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    •  
      icon
      Keith (profile), May 26th, 2011 @ 11:25am

      Re: Hatch

      Me too. I have written him a few times about COICA and all he does is sight bogus numbers about job losses (more jobs were lost because of copyright infringement than when Geneva Steel shut down according to Hatch) and how he is protecting america. He makes me sick.

       

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  •  
    icon
    Derek Kerton (profile), May 26th, 2011 @ 10:43am

    On the Other Hand

    At last we have some bi-partisan cooperation!

     

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  •  
    icon
    Raphael (profile), May 26th, 2011 @ 10:44am

    This comment does not exist.

    I think this bill is [content filtered for national security reasons]. I also think that [content filtered for trademark reasons] is [content filtered for possible defamation reasons] and [content filtered for possible defamation reasons].

    Basically, what I mean is that if we don't [content filtered for national security reasons] we'll end up [content filtered for national security reasons] unless we immediately start [content filtered for national security reasons] with the services provided by [content filtered for copyright reasons].

     

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  •  
    identicon
    Anonymous Coward, May 26th, 2011 @ 10:47am

    They didn't vote to break the internet, they only voted on a law that would make you respect the law, online or not. The free lunch truck is driving away as we speak.

     

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    •  
      icon
      Raphael (profile), May 26th, 2011 @ 10:49am

      Re:

      Hi! My name is Raphael. You are...?

       

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    •  
      icon
      Steven (profile), May 26th, 2011 @ 10:52am

      Re:

      Yes, and what higher respect for the law could you possibly have than ignoring due process and treating free speech as acceptable collateral damage.

       

      reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

    •  
      icon
      Chris Rhodes (profile), May 26th, 2011 @ 10:55am

      Re:

      That "free lunch truck" is actually an NSA van, and the agents inside are currently sorting through your bank records and medical history trying to determine why you feel the need to post anonymously online.

      They say they're only doing it to fight copyright terrorism, of course, so you're probably okay.

       

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    •  
      icon
      senshikaze (profile), May 26th, 2011 @ 10:55am

      Re:

      in the words of Wikipedia:

      [Citation Needed]

       

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    •  
      identicon
      Jeff, May 26th, 2011 @ 10:57am

      Re:

      I missed a free lunch??!?! Oh noes!!! Where'd my free lunch goooooooo???????

      I'm sure you will be a good little soldier in the "War against Free Lunches", and line all of us freeloaders up against the wall to be shot. It is because of jackwagons such as yourself that we the people (sheeple) are steadily losing our 1st and 4th amendment rights to the corporate jackbooted thugocracy our once great and powerful nation has become. Enjoy your smug attitude while it lasts - they will be coming for you next...

       

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    •  
      icon
      Jay (profile), May 26th, 2011 @ 12:18pm

      Re:

      "They didn't vote to break religion, they only voted on a religion that would make you respect the religion, if you believe or not. The free lunch of fish and wine is walking away as we speak."

      FTFY

       

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    •  
      icon
      techflaws.org (profile), May 26th, 2011 @ 11:28pm

      Re:

      they only voted on a law that would make you respect the law

      Dude, repeatin this over and over still won't make it true.

       

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  •  
    icon
    Aitala (profile), May 26th, 2011 @ 10:48am

    Specter

    Specter is gone too.

     

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  •  
    icon
    Aitala (profile), May 26th, 2011 @ 10:48am

    Specter

    Specter is gone too.

     

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  •  
    icon
    A.R.M. (profile), May 26th, 2011 @ 10:49am

    No worries now!

    Ars Technica just received a letter from Senator Ron Wyden's office they'll be putting a hold on this bill as well.

    A floral basked is in order. That's 2-0 for the side of common sense (0 to Disneywood).

    *pops cork

     

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  •  
    identicon
    Donnicton, May 26th, 2011 @ 10:50am

    California? Illinois? Alabama?

    I'm sorry, but your shocked expression is in another castle.

     

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  •  
    identicon
    EF, May 26th, 2011 @ 10:58am

    afews

     

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  •  
    icon
    E. Zachary Knight (profile), May 26th, 2011 @ 11:02am

    I already wrote Coburn about this

    I wrote Senator Coburn about this earlier in the week. It is disappointing to see him vote for this. I just wrote him again. After this and his vote for the PATRIOT Act the other day, he will not be getting my vote ever again.

     

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  •  
    identicon
    MRK, May 26th, 2011 @ 11:02am

    Wrote a letter to my Senator about this (C. Grassley). He was kind of enough to inform me the opinions of the unwashed masses don't matter, and would I kindly contribute to his reelection campaign.

     

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  •  
    icon
    Phillip (profile), May 26th, 2011 @ 11:03am

    Why did we re-elect Lindsey Graham

    He seems to have no backbone and is always voting on the wrong side.

    Sadly, when I was in college I volunteered to hand out some pamphlets door to door for him when he was 1st running for office, and ever since then I've been wishing I hadn't.

     

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  •  
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    CommonSense (profile), May 26th, 2011 @ 11:12am

    Of course

    Dick Head Blumenthal is on that list... I'm still disgusted that he won the election.

     

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  •  
    identicon
    Anonymous Coward, May 26th, 2011 @ 11:22am

    Wait, Al Franken is *still* Hollywood?

    I'd have hoped that getting away from that and into a different environment might have opened his mind a bit. Guess not.

     

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  •  
    icon
    Tim K (profile), May 26th, 2011 @ 11:22am

    Arlen Spector also failed to win re-election. You probably should review the list....

     

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  •  
    icon
    Ron (profile), May 26th, 2011 @ 11:30am

    Money

    It would be nice to have beside their name how much money each of them got from the entertainment industry. Call them out for what they are crooks and lairs.

     

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  •  
    icon
    codeslave (profile), May 26th, 2011 @ 11:31am

    Experts

    Who needs the opinions of experts when lobbyists have truckloads of cash to hand out?

    Public financing of elections, blind trusts for their personal wealth and strict bans on hiring family members of politicians, lobbying by former politicians, or politicians retiring to join companies whom they had previously written laws governing (and the reverse, getting elected to assist your current employer) would help put a stop to some of this. There's way too much money and personal enrichment in US politics.

     

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  •  
    identicon
    Buck Lateral, May 26th, 2011 @ 12:23pm

    It's fun watching Masnick degenerate into maniacal nerd rage. I also love the dismissive comments about routing around this "speedbump" of a law, against the backdrop of hysterical warnings over "breaking the internet."

    This is why serious policy people who oppose this bill pretend they don't know who Masnick is. He's nuttier than squirrel shit on this issue and has the same political gravitas as the Larouche people or the group who warned the world would end on May 21st. Keep up the ravings though, it's great cut-and-paste fodder to send lawmakers to brief them on the position of opponents to the bill- and to give them a good laugh at Masnick's expense.

    I can hardly wait for cloture. Masnick will give new credence to the spontaneous human combustion people after he fulminates himself aflame.

     

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    •  
      icon
      Any Mouse (profile), May 26th, 2011 @ 2:57pm

      Re:

      So, you have nothing constructive to add to the discussion in favor of this bill? Instead you're going to resort to the sort of sophomoric attacks we've come to expect from the pro-ip crowd? It's a sad day for you, isn't it, that you can only come back in this sort of manner.

       

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    •  
      icon
      techflaws.org (profile), May 26th, 2011 @ 11:31pm

      Re:

      You're so desperate paintin him as something he's clearly not it's almost hysterical. At least you should be grateful he's allowing you to post on his blog without you taking your meds.

       

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    •  
      icon
      The eejit (profile), May 26th, 2011 @ 11:46pm

      Re:

      Good to see you went back to posintg anonymously. Again.

      What is this, the fifth time now? Grow up, and start doing something constructive.

       

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  •  
    icon
    Ron (profile), May 26th, 2011 @ 12:35pm

    Money List

    Patrick Leahy Received $381,456 since 2005 from the TV/Music industry

    Dianne Feinstein received $300,449 since 2005 from the tv/music industry

    This from opensecrets.org

     

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  •  
    identicon
    Peter S, May 26th, 2011 @ 12:50pm

    Gone and thankfully.

    Herb Kohl -- Wisconsin Is gone as well... he just gave up.

     

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  •  
    icon
    Overcast (profile), May 26th, 2011 @ 12:57pm

    So in otherwords, it's like shutting down Napster...

    New Peer-to-Peer file sharing technology in 3... 2... ...

     

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  •  
    identicon
    Anonymous Coward, May 26th, 2011 @ 1:33pm

    New World Order will fail

     

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  •  
    icon
    Thomas (profile), May 26th, 2011 @ 1:36pm

    Would be interesting

    if you could list the "campaign contributions" of the congressmen in favor of the measures. Of course this wouldn't show the under the table amounts that most Congressmen receive.

    Plain and simple: the TV/Movie industry pays Congress for favorable votes. In most countries this is called bribery.

     

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    •  
      icon
      The eejit (profile), May 26th, 2011 @ 11:47pm

      Re: Would be interesting

      Yes, but in America, it's called good business. Anywhere else, and you'd be at risk of being jailed. The US? Promoted.

       

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  •  
    identicon
    Anonymous Coward, May 26th, 2011 @ 2:18pm

    Feinstein...Blumenthal...Schumer...Franken. With names like that, does it come as any surprise?

     

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  •  
    identicon
    Anonymous Coward, May 26th, 2011 @ 7:49pm

    Route Around Damage

    If the top of the DNS hierarchy is being interfered with by the US government, then that constitutes damage. It does not matter what batty reason the US government may be giving for its vandalism. It is happening and it is not going to stop.

    The solution is to establish an independent top of the DNS hierarchy outside of US jurisdiction. It may reasonably be assumed that any jurisdiction which finds itself in possession of the top of the DNS hierarchy will attempt similar bad behavior as the US government. Venal politicians exist worldwide. Therefore, it needs to be a distributed system, capable of being moved from jurisdiction to jurisdiction at a moment's notice.

    The organization in charge has to assume it is going to be under attack at all times, like the Pirate Bay or Wikileaks. It needs to plan accordingly.

    Once an independent top of the DNS hierarchy exists, then the rest of the world can point their DNS resolvers at the new service and the US government can do as it pleases, without inconveniencing the rest of the world. Shame about the US residents, though, most of them will be stuck with the broken version of the DNS. The smart ones will be able to get out of it, but not poor old grandma.

     

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  •  
    identicon
    Anonymous Coward, May 27th, 2011 @ 9:56pm

    Any good article defines terms/ acronyms with the first use. I suppose we're just supposed to know what "DNS" means, eh?

    Its not as if three letter acronyms are common and likely to have multiple meanings, or anything.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

  •  
    identicon
    KenF, Nov 30th, 2011 @ 8:24am

    Another Law Written by People who Barely Understand Computers

    You know, I see about 4-5 of these “Good Ideas” come across the wire each year. The real issue is most of this legislation is pre-written by special interest for special interest (RE: RIAA). I have an idea, let’s ask a panel of industry and government IT leaders (note the IT part) to collaborate on a series of distinctions (regulations) and Laws (enforcement) that categorize content, place the ownership of illegal content identification on the content owners (where it belongs), and make blatant thief of copy written materials illegal. This would be an updated series of laws that supersede the Digital Millennium act and address the current sharing, fair-use, and transmission issues people are facing. We should absolutely hold the actual people responsible for theft of content accountable, not the hosts of websites or network provider they traverse.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]


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