If You're Arguing That Someone 'Deserves' Copyright, Your Argument Is Wrong

from the it's-not-about-what-anyone-deserves dept

For many years, we've explained why the debate about copyright is not a moral issue at all. Yet, whenever we get into discussions on it, sooner or later, someone makes an argument about how this or that creator "deserves to make a living" from their art. There are two things wrong with this statement. First, it assumes, incorrectly, that the way you make a living is from copyright. It is not. In fact, much of what we discuss on this blog are ways in which artists might be better off by not enforcing all of the privileges copyright grants them. But, more importantly, the use of the word "deserves" is especially problematic.

Julian Sanchez, who has been doing excellent work on copyright issues of late, has a nice post about how such arguments are totally irrelevant to copyright policy. He notes that it's no surprise that artistic and creative people want greater copyright privileges, and fewer exceptions such as fair use, but that's meaningless:
These will often be wonderful, likeable, creative people, and the correct policy response to these objections as such is: Cry me a fucking river; now piss off.
And the reasoning why is that copyright policy is not about what someone deserves or about rewarding people based on some moral grounding. Its purpose is and has always been clear: to provide incentive to promote progress. There are tradeoffs in these policies, and the end argument should never be about what someone deserves, but about what is the best net result for society on that progress bar. As Sanchez explains:
Wise assessment of copyright policy should have nothing to do with how you feel about the person or entity who holds the right at any particular time, because copyright policy is not about identifying wonderful and meritorious people and ensuring--certainly not as an end in itself, anyway--that their income is proportioned to their intrinsic moral desert--or lack thereof. We are all the massive beneficiaries of millennia of accumulated human scientific knowledge and cultural output, and not one of us did anything do deserve a jot of it. We're all just extremely lucky not to have been born cavemen. The greatest creative genius alive would be hard pressed to create a smiley faced smeared in dung on a tree trunk without that huge and completely undeserved inheritance.

So banish the word "deserve" from your mind when you think about copyright. Nobody "deserves" a goddamn thing. (I say this, for what it's worth, as someone who makes his living entirely through the production of "intellectual property.") The only--the only--relevant question is whether a marginal restriction on the general ability to use information incentivizes enough additional information production over the long run to justify denying that marginal use to every other human being on the planet, whether for simple consumption or further creation.
Exactly right. Yet, somehow, I get the feeling that people will continue to toss out moral arguments. They can't resist... and since they tend not to have the empirical data to support their position, it always gets reduced to irrelevant moral arguments.


Reader Comments (rss)

(Flattened / Threaded)

  1.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 8th, 2011 @ 8:13pm

    I think people simply expect that if they offer something for sale, that if people want it to consume it, they have to pay for it.

    If they don't want to consume it, walk away and don't pay anything.

    But don't think you're entitled to the benefits of having something that you didn't pay for.

    This is a simple and moral concept that I never see addressed here. I wonder why.

     

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    Nicedoggy, Apr 8th, 2011 @ 8:16pm

    Re:

    Did you pay your dues to the creators of your car, house and furniture already, if not you don't deserve the use of those and you are a low life thief who deserves no respect.

    This is a simple and moral concept that I never see you address here. I wonder why.

     

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    Chuck (profile), Apr 8th, 2011 @ 8:19pm

    Re:

    "But don't think you're entitled to the benefits of having something that you didn't pay for."
    So, have you started paying your parents back?

     

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  4.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 8th, 2011 @ 8:20pm

    Yes, I purchased my car, home and furniture. I did not take them without paying.

    Are you saying you think it's ok to take something that is for sale without paying and without permission?

     

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    Nicedoggy, Apr 8th, 2011 @ 8:26pm

    Re:

    Copyright people think they have a right to defraud the public in the biggest theft ever committed in human history.

    If anybody tried to claim that you didn't buy something but rented after it they were told what they bought was a real sale anyone would call the other guy a thief, still somehow it is ok to let artists rent things and call them sales I wonder why that is?

    If anybody sold me a house and comeback to me and told me I couldn't profit from it without paying him more or I couldn't rent the house to others without asking for permission I would say to him to sod off and still somehow art is different.

    I don't see those people addressing those really serious concerns and I wonder why.

     

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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 8th, 2011 @ 8:26pm

    Re: Re:

    What did my parents offer for sale that I took without paying?

     

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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 8th, 2011 @ 8:28pm

    Re: Re:

    I see you have no answer or defense to the simple question I asked, and felt the need to change the subject.

     

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    Nicedoggy, Apr 8th, 2011 @ 8:28pm

    Re:

    Copyright can also be used to create monopolies for other industries like ink cartridges, Sony, Microsoft and other have been trying real hard to do recently.

    There could be a time where you washing machine would not accept "unauthorized" detergent brands, or it could tweet to the police if an unauthorized technician tried to open it.

    Those things the crazy defenders of copyright never address and I wonder why.

     

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  9.  
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    Nicedoggy, Apr 8th, 2011 @ 8:31pm

    Re:

    How many payments did you pay exactly.

    The creator of your car have the right to be paid every time you use your car, you can't lend it without paying the creator. The creator of your car also have a legitimate claim to your earnings since you use it to make a profit right?

    Do you pay the car creator every time you use their property to make money?

     

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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 8th, 2011 @ 8:37pm

    Re: Re: Re:

    How did I change the subject, you are claiming that it is perfectly normal to charge people over again and again and again even after you told them they "bought" something, that is fraud to me, or do you think it is ok to say that you sold somebody something and come asking for money if they make use of it in some manner?

    If car companies started charging cabs because they make a living out of the creators cars would that be ok?

    Would it be ok if you bought a house and the creator of the house charged you because you rented the house to someone else?

    You claim copyright is fair, how that is fair? How that is morally justifiable when no one else could possibly do such things and be called and honest person, but somehow artists apparently live in another reality where that is perfectly normal and I wonder why.

     

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    blaktron (profile), Apr 8th, 2011 @ 8:37pm

    No law should be a moral argument. Because morality isnt absolute. Even the law against murder isnt about morality, but about safety. You give up your 'right' to murder me, i give up my 'right' to murder you. Thats what's known as balance in law. When people talk about balance in copyright, they are usually talking about something else entirely.

    Mike usually has it right, in saying that a balanced copyright would balance the creator against society as a whole, not the creator against an infringing party.

     

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    blaktron (profile), Apr 8th, 2011 @ 8:40pm

    Re:

    And if you wanted to, you could sell your car, home and furniture, correct? THAT is the difference, so you've clearly missed the point...

     

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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 8th, 2011 @ 8:44pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re:

    My post said nothing about copyright. I asked a simple question that you don't want to answer.

    Everyone knows why, too.

     

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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 8th, 2011 @ 8:46pm

    Re:

    Did you paid the creator of the instruments you use for every use you made out of that? Do you send them your part of their due cut when you play something and make money out of it?

    Oh that is right only you have the right to molest others about those things because somehow you are more important than the rest of society and you deserve the right to charge for every use of your work but others don't.

    I wonder why.

     

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    Chosen Reject (profile), Apr 8th, 2011 @ 8:50pm

    Re:

    Here is a lady who is claiming ownership of the sun. She is offering the use of it for sale. Morally, she has as much right to be paid as anyone who is selling "intellectual property". Legally she is in a bit of a bind, but morally, she stands on the same non-existent ground.

    Just because you offer something for sale doesn't mean anyone has to pay you for it. Now if someone takes it away from you without paying for it, that's theft and we consider that to be wrong, both legally and morally. However, if someone acquires what you have without taking it away from you and still doesn't pay for it, that's not theft and there is nothing morally wrong with that. Due to copyright laws, there may be legal consequences, but there is nothing morally wrong with it.

    Can you refute that?

     

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    Nicedoggy, Apr 8th, 2011 @ 8:51pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    Answer what the absurd insinuation you made?

    You above all should not be the one trying to make a moral claim, because copyright is so absurd and proof of that is that you wouldn't find it fair if the creators of the instruments you use to make a living come calling you asking for more money because they feel entitled to the money you make with their "property" that they "created".

    That is how absurd your position is, that is how everybody sees it except you and your gang apparently.

     

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    James, Apr 8th, 2011 @ 8:59pm

    Length matters

    It's not just whether copyright is fair or not, they've been extending the length of time works are covered by it to unreasonable periods. 75 years is way too long. If you can't make your money off an idea or song in 10 years, too bad. It belongs to everyone now.

     

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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 8th, 2011 @ 9:00pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    You seem to be making assumptions about who I am; perhaps you should sign in so everyone can see that you are indeed who we suspect...

    you wouldn't find it fair if the creators of the instruments you use to make a living come calling you asking for more money

    You seem to have jumped ahead a few too many steps. I didn't ask a question about copyright. I'm talking about taking something without paying; whether its copyrighted or not is irrelevant to that question.

     

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    Chosen Reject (profile), Apr 8th, 2011 @ 9:00pm

    Re:

    This post will cost you $5 to read. I am offering it for sale. By United States copyright law, this post is copyrighted to me. I own the copyright to this post. I am also offering it for sale for $5. Only $5 for this short amount of time. If you continue to read this post without paying me $5 then you are taking something that is for sale without paying and without permission. Therefore you are breaking the law AND being immoral.

    Can you look yourself in the mirror after stealing from me?

    If so, then feel free to download a bittorrent client of your choice and start torrenting any copyrighted movie of your choice. There really is no difference.

    If however, you do want to pay me for this post, please reply and we can work out the details of how to process that payment. If no payment is received and you still read this post, then you really are acknowledging that there really is nothing morally wrong with not paying someone for something they offer for sale and yet take it anyway.

    However, even if you find yourself realizing there is nothing morally wrong, you still legally owe me $5. I hope that clears up any confusion.

     

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    Nicedoggy, Apr 8th, 2011 @ 9:05pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    Nope you are the one making wrong assumptions, if you are a musician your instruments would be musical, if you are a software engineers your instruments would be software, computers, if you are a street vendor your cart would be your instrument.

    Well and if you are talking about taking something without paying you are in the wrong thread because I see nothing in the post that refers to that, care to point out where in that article it says it is ok to take something without paying?

    You can't and we all know why don't we?

     

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  21.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 8th, 2011 @ 9:07pm

    Re: Re:

    You'll have to talk to Mike about that, not me.

    I believe you waived that right when you posted here, but check his TOS if you're not sure.

     

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  22.  
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    Nicedoggy, Apr 8th, 2011 @ 9:09pm

    Re:

    What people don't expect is to be harassed and persecuted for something they already paid and accused of theft for not paying more because some crazy person feels entitled for more money.

    That you never address and I wonder why.

     

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    Chosen Reject (profile), Apr 8th, 2011 @ 9:10pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    I'll answer your "question". I only put it in quotes because I can't find you asking any question, but I think that you are asking the following question (correct me if I'm wrong):

    "Is it immoral to take something from someone without paying for it?"

    Here's my answer to that question (again, if that's not the question you are asking, correct me). I think it's morally wrong to take something from someone without paying them an amount that they agree to.

    However, morally speaking, I don't think there is anything wrong whatsoever to copy something that someone is selling. Legally speaking may be a different matter. But morally, I have no problem copying something that someone else has, even if they are offering it for sale. So the keyword here is take. So take without just compensation? Sure, that's morally wrong. Copy without any compensation? No. No moral objections whatsoever.

     

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    Capitalist Lion Tamer (profile), Apr 8th, 2011 @ 9:12pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    Anonymous Coward, Apr 8th, 2011 @ 9:00pm
    You seem to be making assumptions about who I am; perhaps you should sign in so everyone can see that you are indeed who we suspect...


    SRSLY?

     

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    Nicedoggy, Apr 8th, 2011 @ 9:13pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    There is a post in detention right now, that tries to answer your questions.

    Can you show us where in the article it says it is ok to take something without paying?

    All I see is something written clarifying how we should look at copyrights, but you don't answer that and I wonder why?

    Instead you jump to conclusions and go on a tangent trying to sense your way to try force a moral issue and when confronted goes running and trying to hide shame on you dude.

     

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  26.  
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    Chosen Reject (profile), Apr 8th, 2011 @ 9:16pm

    Re: Re: Re:

    There is no TOS here on techdirt that states that any comments are work for hire, so I still own the copyright. Let's be very serious here. I offered my post for sale, and you read it anyway without paying me. That means you have no moral problems "taking" something for your own consumption without paying for it even while it was being offered for sale. I'm being very serious here, by reading that comment and not paying for it, you really have shown that you have no moral problem with "taking" something that you didn't pay for. I even stated it upfront. I didn't hide it in the fine print at the bottom after you'd read it.

    As far as I know, you haven't illegally copied it, so legally you are in the clear. But this discussion isn't about legality. It's about morality. In that regard, you came in here trying to make a moral argument. By reading my post above without paying for it, you have failed.

     

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  27.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 8th, 2011 @ 9:21pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    So because technology has availed you to the ability to copy something you want for free, thus removing the need for you to purchase it, you're ok with doing that despite the fact the creator offered it for sale only?

     

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    blaktron (profile), Apr 8th, 2011 @ 9:21pm

    Re: Re:

    This is the best link I've seen an a while. Thank you from the bottom of my heart.

     

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  29.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 8th, 2011 @ 9:23pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re:

    There is no TOS here on techdirt that states that any comments are work for hire

    Then you just sent your comment into public domain, didn't you?

     

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    blaktron (profile), Apr 8th, 2011 @ 9:29pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    No, he published it on the internet (like an MP3) and you consumed it. Im not going to pay him, because I believe his information is freely shared, but you dont. So pay up.

     

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  31.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 8th, 2011 @ 9:29pm

    Re:

    "I think people simply expect that if they offer something for sale, that if people want it to consume it, they have to pay for it."

    People expect that if you don't want to allow others to copy your work, no one is forcing you to distribute it, but don't expect others or a government to enforce a monopoly for you if you choose to distribute it. Monopolies cost time and money to enforce, others have to spend the time and effort to determine what is and what isn't infringement and that time and effort is worth money you aren't entitled to the benefits of the time and effort spent to enforce your monopoly.

    "This is a simple and moral concept that I never see addressed here. I wonder why."

    No, it is addressed. If you don't want others to copy something you said or distributed, simply don't say it and don't distribute it. No one is forcing you to. But don't expect others to let you monopolize something that you choose to distribute. That's the moral of the story. Copy'right' isn't about making sure that people get paid, the founding fathers didn't intend for it to be. The founding fathers recognize that no one is entitled to a (free or non-free) monopoly. It's about promoting the progress.

     

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    Chosen Reject (profile), Apr 8th, 2011 @ 9:30pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    Absolutely. When/if Star Trek replicators come into existence, I will never pay for food again, no matter how much Kroger may want me to. If you feel that it is morally wrong, you are free to pay. I however, will feel no moral reason for paying if I have a replicator.

     

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    Chosen Reject (profile), Apr 8th, 2011 @ 9:35pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    Unfortunately, that post will not end up in the public domain for a very long time. In the US, all works are automatically copyrighted. I can't sue you until I register it, but I still own the copyright.

    Unfortunately for you, however, this wasn't a legal discussion but a moral one. You asked if it was "ok to take something that is for sale without paying and without permission". I didn't grant you permission. I offered it for sale. You didn't pay. Yet you seem to think that what you did was OK. So I ask you the same thing:

    Are you saying you think it's ok to take something that is for sale without paying and without permission?

     

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    Any Mouse (profile), Apr 8th, 2011 @ 9:36pm

    Re:

    I think, perhaps, you should come down off your moral high horse and stop asking loaded questions, then acting all superior and changing what your saying when someone responds to it. All this post of your's was is troll bait. Now, get back on topic.

    No, I didn't address your question, because it's a dishonest question.

     

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  35.  
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    Memyself, Apr 8th, 2011 @ 9:39pm

    Re: Re:

    Cars are cars. Houses are houses. Entertainment is entertainment. The terms of sale do not translate from one form of property over to another easily.

    To put it another way: A book might take a years worth of labor to write. What you pay for said book is a fraction of the cost as measured by labor. To make this system work, the purchase comes with specific limitations attached. Limited rights to distribution and reproduction. That way the cost of the book is spread out amongst many people.

    But when you buy a car? You pay the full price of materials and labor plus a heft percentage. Same with a house.

    Now, if you WANT to buy the equivalent rights to a book, if you want to own it fully, you often CAN. But the cost is higher. Just like when you want to own a house instead of renting one or own a car instead of renting one. You take that economic plunge, you can do with your property what you wise. Within reason, of course. Restrictions on rights of homeowners do still exist.

     

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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 8th, 2011 @ 9:40pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    The creator offered the original for sale only. If someone else offers a copy for free, there is nothing morally wrong with me making a copy, even if the creator doesn't like it. If the creator doesn't like it, no one is forcing him/her to create. He or she can find another job instead. But to force everyone else to go through the economic inefficiency necessary to enforce a monopoly (ie: it wastes everyone's time and effort to determine what is and what is not infringement before copying something) just because some creator wants to charge for copies that others may make is not a burden that any creator should be allowed to put on others. The creator can simply contribute to the economy elsewhere by finding another job and content will still be created without him/her.

     

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  37.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 8th, 2011 @ 9:40pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    The creator offered the original for sale only. If someone else offers a copy for free, there is nothing morally wrong with me making a copy, even if the creator doesn't like it. If the creator doesn't like it, no one is forcing him/her to create. He or she can find another job instead. But to force everyone else to go through the economic inefficiency necessary to enforce a monopoly (ie: it wastes everyone's time and effort to determine what is and what is not infringement before copying something) just because some creator wants to charge for copies that others may make is not a burden that any creator should be allowed to put on others. The creator can simply contribute to the economy elsewhere by finding another job and content will still be created without him/her.

     

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  38.  
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    Nicedoggy, Apr 8th, 2011 @ 9:41pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    Sure why not, I can copy the work done by photostands with Gimp(or Photoshop) now, should I be ashamed of it?

    Printers killed the market for instant photo revelation should I care about those business? nope

    Digital distribution killed CD's should I care about it? nope

    If some people want to get paid ask for the money before to create it and have no claims after that, you know work like others have to and be done with it.
    http://www.pledgemusic.com/

    Maybe the future of music is in pledge systems, live gigs and merch, but I'm certain copyrights will be changed sometime in the future, because it is so abusive right now.

     

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  39.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 8th, 2011 @ 9:45pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    Furthermore, if a creator doesn't want others copying his/her work, his/her music/movies shouldn't be broadcasted over broadcasting spectra that the government grants usage monopolies on. It displaces permissibly licensed content that others can freely copy and redistribute. Same thing goes for similarly monopolized cableco infrastructure. No government should ever grant a monopoly on both content and content distribution.

     

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    Brett (profile), Apr 8th, 2011 @ 9:51pm

    Yet, somehow, I get the feeling that people will continue to toss out moral arguments. They can't resist... and since they tend not to have the empirical data to support their position, it always gets reduced to irrelevant moral arguments.


    Blame it on human nature. A tentative privilege for utilitarian purposes in the first generation becomes perceived as an entitlement by the second generation who grew up with it, and a right by the third generation.

    Not to mention that people are really good with rationalizing their self-perceived self-interest with moral arguments. It's who we are.

     

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  41.  
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    Nicedoggy, Apr 8th, 2011 @ 9:51pm

    Re: Re: Re:

    Or we can just get rid of copyrights and make artists actually have to work for a living.

    They could just ask people to pay for the production of their work like in pledgemusic and have no further claims that would save millions in enforcement costs and liberate the courts to keep track of some serious crap that needs to be addressed like real criminals.

     

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  42.  
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    Brett (profile), Apr 8th, 2011 @ 9:53pm

    Re: Re: Re:

    Cars are cars. Houses are houses. Entertainment is entertainment. The terms of sale do not translate from one form of property over to another easily


    They are not the same, in the same way that copyright infringement is not theft because the original creator/owner is not deprived of anything other that artificially created rent. If I steal your shovel, you've lost a shovel. But if I make a copy of your shovel, you haven't lost anything.

     

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  43.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 8th, 2011 @ 9:54pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    While I think that your stance is immoral, at least you are man enough to say exactly what your beliefs are.

     

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    Nicedoggy, Apr 8th, 2011 @ 9:54pm

    Re: Re: Re:

    So now IP is different from real property right?

    LoL

    You guys crank me up.

    Even drugs has less protections and rights and they take decades and billions to produce but somehow copyrights are fine even though they can be used to protect real stuff in the real world that should not have those absurd protections.

     

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    Memyself, Apr 8th, 2011 @ 9:56pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    In most instances, what the creator actually offers for sale is a copy, not an original. The sale of the copy comes with limited ownership rights which is why the copy you can buy costs what it costs. Usually, full ownership (reproduction and distribution) rights are available at a much higher cost.

    Is it morally wrong to purchase an item under specific conditions and then violate the terms of the purchase? Morality is impossible to discern under the best of conditions. The real question whether or not sellers should be allowed to dictate terms of sale on products they create, and if those terms are legally binding when the agreement is entered into willingly by both parties. My personal opinion is - if you find the terms of sale constrictive or repugnant, don't buy what the seller is offering. But just because you disagree with the terms set should not give you a free license to break the terms once you have what you want.

     

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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 8th, 2011 @ 9:59pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    I'll tell you what, if you can show that your post makes any sense legally, I'll happily mail you 5 bucks.

     

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  47.  
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    blaktron (profile), Apr 8th, 2011 @ 9:59pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    So what about the person who doesnt buy? Hmm? The point about copyright law is that its all encompassing contract law that doesnt require agreement to be enforceable.

     

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    Chosen Reject (profile), Apr 8th, 2011 @ 10:00pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    I have no problem someone else thinking I'm immoral. So long as I don't do things that I think are immoral, I'm happy. However, I do have a problem with hypocrisy. Unless someone else is posting from the same IP address as you (and I admit it's possible) then either you owe me $5 so you can follow your own morals, or you can admit that you don't actually find it immoral to take something without paying the person who is selling it. Your read my post below. I stated upfront that you owe me $5 for doing so. Pay up and follow your morals, or admit you don't find it immoral.

     

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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 8th, 2011 @ 10:00pm

    Re: Re: Re:

    "To make this system work"

    People will write books without copy'right' so systems of writing books will continue without such copy'right' protections. Sure, you may argue that copy'right' can also participate in certain systems of writing books that "work" but that doesn't mean they "work" for the public good. A system where the government charges you $100 per glass of water may "work" but that's meaningless.

    Take textbooks as an example. They cost a fortune. If you look at a calculus book from one semester vs the next edition for the next semester, the only difference? The chapters were flipped around a bit, problems were changed a bit, etc... but because the publisher stopped making books for the last edition and the school needs to provide all students with textbooks, students are forced to buy new textbooks. The publisher makes a TON more money than the cost of making a new edition. Just like with the pharmaceutical industry, the costs are largely exaggerated. IP gives incentive for such exaggerations to attempt to justify the artificially high prices.

    If the books were allowed to go into the public domain within a reasonable period of time, the school can simply make its own copies of the old editions and sell them to students at a reasonable price. Students can also make their own copies. Then publishers will have to compete to sufficiently improve the content of their books in order to sell new ones. but even without copy'right' if publishers can produce books that are worth the additional cost, they can charge the school for the books ahead of time (the school can then roll over those costs into tuition. Either way, students are paying regardless, so I would much rather pay for my books and be able to copy them as well). Publishers can then initially sell them in huge bundles to make back their money and the school and others can then make as many copies as they like. Book creation will still continue. People will find alternative ways to fund the creation of books.

    But copy'right' encourages special interest groups to get involved in the political process of what set of books colleges buy and that causes the whole thing to become politicized in a way that isn't in the public interest.

     

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    DMNTD, Apr 8th, 2011 @ 10:04pm

    umm.

    How can you say "human nature" with what should be blamed and then go on ahead and admit its because of the civilization and how such "generations" go about learning from each other.

    Try again, its a bad statement and an affront to human nature.

     

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    Memyself, Apr 8th, 2011 @ 10:05pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re:

    Yeah. They're not the same. Isn't that what I just said?

    Yes, the "rent" IS artificially created. That's why the price is a fraction of the cost one would normally be expected to pay for a years worth of labor. Displacing the cost amongst many helps allow art to be sold at a price much lower than would normally be dictated according to labor involved. Trying to make the economics of art analogous to the economics of cars or houses or tangible property ignores the very real differences between these things.

     

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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 8th, 2011 @ 10:06pm

    This site has provided insightful commentary for a long time, but this is off the deep end. I write scientific research for a living. Those works are copyrighted. I deserve a reference if anyone uses my ideas and data, and I certainly deserve protection if someone tries to pass my ideas and data off as their own.

     

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    Memyself, Apr 8th, 2011 @ 10:08pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    If you want the good in question, and it is only available at a cost, and you circumvent the cost... what do you think? You've broken the conditions required to acquire the item in question.

    No one is forced into any form of copyright agreement. You are free to turn your back on any offering. Just because you disagree with the terms set should not give you a free license to circumvent the purchase price.

     

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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 8th, 2011 @ 10:11pm

    Re: Re:

    The creator of your car have the right to be paid every time you use your car, you can't lend it without paying the creator.

    If you lease your car, then the person that bought it outright does get paid effectively every time you use your car. Well, when you use the owner's car; you're only leasing it. If you use his car too much, you will pay him more.

    The creator of your car also have a legitimate claim to your earnings since you use it to make a profit right?

    And those payments will come out of your earnings.

    Do you pay the car creator every time you use their property to make money?

    If you are leasing your car, you pay the person who owns it every time you use it - to make money or not.

    If you license some content, then you pay whatever the terms of the license are. If you buy the copyright outright, then you can do whatever you want with it. You can do that, you know. Why don't you buy the copyrights from copyright holders?

    You don't expect that if you lease your car, you can sell it, right? Or that you'll get to keep it if you stop paying the owner, right?

     

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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 8th, 2011 @ 10:12pm

    Re: Re: Re:

    "To make this system work, the purchase comes with specific limitations attached."

    The problem is that you assume that these limitations are necessary for a system of book creation to "work" and that copy'right' is necessary for such a system to work. No, systems of book creation will work without copy'right', people will make books without such protections.

     

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    Nicedoggy, Apr 8th, 2011 @ 10:12pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    Well, so car creators should start selling cars with limited rights too, house creators, furniture creators they all have to get their rights too.

    Also my personal opinion on the fact that those restrictions are just ridiculous and impossible to enforce is that if somebody want to get paid they do what car manufactures do, they ask for an acceptable price and release that product to be used for whatever purposes others want to without further claims.

    If that is not acceptable nobody is forcing them to release anything they can just not produce and hope people will beg them to produce something and pay more upfront for it.

    Now creating absurd terms and expecting others to respect those term ain't happening, people told them loud and clear already that they won't respect crazy claims no matter how loud those people complain about it.

    Recently 12 years old girls all started taking pictures from the big screen, would anybody have the balls to send them all to prison, or initiate legal proceedings that would ruin their families financially?

    The day that happens is the day, artists will have to buy bullet proof armor because I doubt the ruined parents of those kids will take it kindly and that is how I know those laws are just crazy.

     

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    Nicedoggy, Apr 8th, 2011 @ 10:15pm

    Re: Re: Re:

    Quote:
    And those payments will come out of your earnings.


    As a percentage calculate in addition to renting the car?
    You know just like royalties are calculated.

    Also you do realize that if somebody tells you, that you are "buying" something that is not a lease right?

     

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    Memyself, Apr 8th, 2011 @ 10:16pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re:

    For the record, I believe that educational tools should not be held to the same restrictions as entertainment. Yes, the abuse you mention in regards to textbooks is atrocious.

    Outside of that: I never said there weren't other systems. You quote me referring to a specific and then point to a general? To what purpose? Yes, to make the specific system work, the one where books are often sold for under ten dollars, limited rights (no distribution or reproduction) help ensure that the artist in question can sell enough copies so that the cost of producing the work in question is recouped. That's the way the system under discussion works. This doesn't mean that other systems do not exist.

    That said: I don't find your promise that books will continue to be written sufficiently compelling on it's own. By all means, please expand on how exactly we can be ensured that the current artistic output would be maintained without copyright - assuming that tis what you are implying.

     

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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 8th, 2011 @ 10:17pm

    Re: Re:

    Did you paid the creator of the instruments you use for every use you made out of that? Do you send them your part of their due cut when you play something and make money out of it?

    It depends on how I acquired the instrument. If I acquired the instrument through an all-out sale, then I wouldn't have to pay anybody a cut. If I rented the instrument, and the terms of the rental said that I didn't have to pay anybody, then I wouldn't either. If I signed a contract with the renter that said I would pay them for every performance, I would have to pay him a cut.

    Copyright effectively sets the default terms of a contract between the owner and the users of content. Unlike a regular contract, you do not have to sign it because it's part of the law. Like a contract, the parties are free to negotiate alternative deals as they like.

     

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    Nicedoggy, Apr 8th, 2011 @ 10:18pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    Nobody is also forcing creators to sell limited rights too, if that doesn't work why not start asking for the entire cost up front, like I dunno everybody else in society does?

    Why can't they just ask for a 100K and when that is achieved put the work for the world to do whatever they want to and have no further claims just like everybody else in society?

    Why do they need to be different?

     

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  61.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 8th, 2011 @ 10:19pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    "Displacing the cost amongst many helps allow art to be sold at a price much lower than would normally be dictated according to labor involved."

    You incorrectly assume that copy'right' is the only way to recover the cost of art. No, art has been and will continue to be created without such laws. People will find other ways to recover the cost of art. The cost of the original art, for instance, is generally worth far more than the cost of a copy and in many instances collectors and museums are willing to pay that cost. They can then distribute those costs over to their visitors by charging them an entrance fee. Just because visitors may have copies of that art online doesn't mean no one will ever go to a museum and pay the entrance fee. If anything, those online pictures will often encourage more people to go see the original.

    There are many other ways people can recover the costs of creating art. Heck, many people who create art do it as a hobby out of enjoyment and they would be more than happy to release that art to the public to freely copy. Art will continue without these laws. Even if some won't create art without these laws, I'm fine with that, they can find other ways to contribute to the economy by finding other jobs instead. I don't want the government directing people to create art over the labor that people would otherwise produce elsewhere because that creates artificially less labor elsewhere in the economy.

     

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    Nicedoggy, Apr 8th, 2011 @ 10:20pm

    Re: Re: Re:

    No it doesn't, the creators have rights to their creations do they not?

    If you make money out of their creations they are entitled to have a cut of your earnings is that not right?

     

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    Memyself, Apr 8th, 2011 @ 10:21pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re:

    I made no such assumption and no such argument. You are assigning generic opinions to me that I did not advance. You can do better.

     

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    Chosen Reject (profile), Apr 8th, 2011 @ 10:24pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    You really are missing the point. This isn't a legal issue. You wanted a moral argument. That's what I'm making. You tried to state that it was immoral to take what someone was offering for sale. I offered my post for $5 (offer still stands), but you read it without paying for it. According to you, that's immoral. There's no legal compunction for you to pay. Only a moral one.

    There are no laws that say you have to do what is moral. If you want to be immoral, that's up to you. If you want to break the law, then the government will get involved, but feel free to be as morally bankrupt or upstanding as you see fit. Morals are all that's involved in this discussion and that's how you wanted it to be.

    You claim that it is immoral to consume without payment that which is offered for sale. You "consumed" my post that was offered for sale and you did so without payment. Therefore, you are immoral by your own standards. To get out of that conundrum, you can either pay me $5 to be back on your own moral high ground, or you can admit that you don't find it immoral. If you don't take either of those steps, you remain hypocritical and immoral by your own standards. So which is it? Is it immoral or not? Are you immoral or not? Simply answer the question. I did it for you above. Why do you find it so hard now?

     

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    Memyself, Apr 8th, 2011 @ 10:29pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    Car and house owners do exactly what you describe. It's called "renting". You get use of the property, but not full rights of ownership.

    There are many, MANY different kinds of transactions currently at play within our society.

    The problem with the "acceptable" price idea is that the cost of creating art and the value to the individual are rarely going to be in accord. A book might take a few days to read but more than a year to write. So in an effort to make a reasonable price available... we have the current system.

    The "nobody is forcing them to release anything" argument might hod value if it wasn't also true that nobody is forcing you to consume what the artists release. You think that people should be discouraged from releasing their endeavors into the public if they do not meet your specific expectations? To meet the specific demands of each person everywhere? Isn't it easier for you just not to participate?

    If you don't like the terms of sale - Walk Away.

     

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  66.  
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    Nicedoggy, Apr 8th, 2011 @ 10:29pm

    Re:

    When did you see anybody accept plagiarism protected or not?
    The only protection you need is from your peers that can blackball any bad actor not government protection.

     

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    Memyself, Apr 8th, 2011 @ 10:33pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re:

    As the anonymous poster stated: It depends on the terms.

     

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  68.  
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    Nicedoggy, Apr 8th, 2011 @ 10:34pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    How about writers start to ask for money in advance like everybody else do.

    Instead of asking to publisher they just need to go directly to the public and set a fixed price like everybody else do, and have no further claims on the final product like every other industry.

    Why can't that be done?

     

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  69.  
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    Memyself, Apr 8th, 2011 @ 10:35pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    I never stated that the method under discussion is the only way to recover production costs.

     

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    Memyself, Apr 8th, 2011 @ 10:42pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    Everyone else in society does NOT ask for 100% cost upfront from a single consumer. There are many forms of transactions that occur in society on a daily basis. In regards to this one - if you don't like the terms of sale, don't purchase the product. Saying that "Nobody is also forcing creators to sell limited rights" is akin to saying "why are you hitting yourself" when you are hitting someone with their own hand. Why should any seller not be free to set the terms of sale on their product? If the terms are disagreeable, don't participate.

    Basically you're asking why art should not be sold as if it weren't art. Because it's art. Not a car and not a house and not textbooks and not medicine. Not everything should be treated exactly the same in regards to economics.

     

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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 8th, 2011 @ 10:42pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    ok, if it's only a moral issue, post a link to something you create and offer it for sale. If if I take it without paying you I've lost moral ground.

    I read your post above in the same way I read all other posts here; since the owner has stated it is all free to disseminated as any one cares to.

    If attempting to trick me is the only way you feel you can bring me down to your moral standard, then you haven't done a very good job of it, have you?

     

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  72.  
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    Nicedoggy, Apr 8th, 2011 @ 10:44pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    Car owners sell cars and say they need to be paid for use of it?

    Car owners sell cars and charge you if you use it to make money off of it?

    Car creators hold rights to their cars after being "sold"?
    Car creators complain about all that money invested in R&D?

    Quote:
    You think that people should be discouraged from releasing their endeavors into the public if they do not meet your specific expectations? To meet the specific demands of each person everywhere? Isn't it easier for you just not to participate?


    You think car manufactures should sell their cars for $10 dollars and have claims over every penny you make?

    Why can't artists just ask for the money they need up front and have no further claims down the line just like every other industry?

     

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    Memyself, Apr 8th, 2011 @ 10:45pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    It can be. And it is. Just as some writers already distribute their works for free.

    Why should there be only one way? Why should every artists be required to sell according to your rules? Doesn't it make more sense to allow the seller to set their terms and then let the consumer decide on a case by case basis if those terms are reasonable?

     

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  74.  
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    Memyself, Apr 8th, 2011 @ 10:46pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    I don't think copyright works the way you seem to think it does.

     

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    Nicedoggy, Apr 8th, 2011 @ 10:49pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    Really?
    Who else do you know that sells anything below the cost of production?

    There is no such thing, either they give it away to make money elsewhere or they charge the full price of production of that item, why are artists any different from other industries?

    Why can't they make money from merch, live gigs or ask for people to give them money to directly produce and release that without further claims like every other industry out there?

     

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    Memyself, Apr 8th, 2011 @ 10:49pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    Rent a car. Rent a house. It's not fully analogous by any means, but it is you, paying money for something with a limited set of rights.

    Art is art. Trying to force it into the economic framework of something that is not art does not work.

     

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    Memyself, Apr 8th, 2011 @ 10:53pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    Do you pay the full for a car or a house when you rent it? No. When you get a haircut does the barber charge you the full cost of his business operations? Splitting the cost of business or goods amongst many consumers is a very common practice. You claiming otherwise does not change this.

     

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    Nicedoggy, Apr 8th, 2011 @ 10:54pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    Does not work? Says who?

    I see Sellaband working, I see PledgeMusic working, I see Jamendo working, I see Magnatune working, I see open source working, everywhere I look I see people making money directly or indirectly for art without the benefit of full copyrights and you are saying it does not work? are those people imaginary people like imaginary property?

    Even this blog has several examples of alternatives that work and you willfully ignore them why?

    Copyright need to change or go away.

     

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  79.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 8th, 2011 @ 10:55pm

    Yeah, no one deserves their work, inventions, or creations protected at all. Period. If you think they do, your argument is wrong. Because I said so. Yeah.

    Seriously Mike, you need to grow the fuck up, and realize you and the rest of the world can't freeload everything.

     

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  80.  
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    Chosen Reject (profile), Apr 8th, 2011 @ 10:56pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    Here is a link. Or are you arguing that I have to have an effective way to enforce payment prior to you having the content?

    If so, I counter with the ease of obtaining any copyrighted movie, show, book, video game, song, picture or other work. I can easily obtain Harry Potter (in book, movie, or video game form) from lots of places. Are you saying you shouldn't have to pay because the seller hasn't made it difficult enough to obtain it without payment?

    Again, if that is what you are saying, then you are also saying there is nothing morally wrong with using an adblocker to obtain content that is on sites whose business model includes advertising.

    Again, if that is what you are saying, then you are also saying that bypassing the New York Times paywall is morally OK.

    I could go on. The point is, of the above two, only one is illegal. But for the sake of this thread, we put aside legality and are only looking at morality, and we did so by your request. I posted a link to something I created. I am offering it for sale. You didn't pay for it, yet you read it. As for this statement of yours:
    I read your post above in the same way I read all other posts here; since the owner has stated it is all free to disseminated as any one cares to.
    It's correct that I didn't say anything in regards to the posts dissemination. You are free to copy it as you please. I only ask that you pay me for reading it. You read it. By your own claimed morals, you owe me for it.

    Again I'll state that you have no legal obligation to pay me, only your own moral obligation. Or you can admit that you don't find it immoral to do so. You've already lost moral ground. The only way to get it back is to admit that you don't find it immoral, or pay me $5.

     

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  81.  
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    Chosen Reject (profile), Apr 8th, 2011 @ 10:56pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    Where am I wrong?

     

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    Nicedoggy, Apr 8th, 2011 @ 10:58pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    Why should consumers have to fallow your rules?
    Why can't it be decided what people are willing to accept without the use of laws?

     

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    Nicedoggy, Apr 8th, 2011 @ 11:01pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    Here is a rewrite of your post:

    Quote:
    Why should there be only one way? Why should every consumer be required to buy according to your rules? Doesn't it make more sense to allow the consumer to set their terms and then let the seller decide on a case by case basis if those terms are reasonable?

     

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    Memyself, Apr 8th, 2011 @ 11:02pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    It's not your website. I don't believe you have the power to copyright material on it in any way that would prohibit access to others or that would allow you to monetize the site to your own benefit.

     

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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 8th, 2011 @ 11:02pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    I'll be honest with you, I didn't read your post all the way through the first time. I read the first line, chuckled and responded.

    Like I say, if you can provide a moral dilemma for me that doesn't involve tricking me, and I fail it, then I've lost the moral high ground.

    In the meantime, as I don't download copyrighted material without permission, and you, I gather, do, you're going to have a very difficult time saying I'm on the same moral ground as you.

     

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  86.  
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    Nicedoggy, Apr 8th, 2011 @ 11:03pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    Then why do you insist that copyright is the only way to make money?

    That is a one solution that is a problem for society right now and it will get changed.

     

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  87.  
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    Brendan (profile), Apr 8th, 2011 @ 11:05pm

    Re: Re:

    Could you please sign up for a real account and log in?
    Why does your ip keep changing on every damned comment? Browsing on td via tor? Please log in ffs.

     

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    Memyself, Apr 8th, 2011 @ 11:07pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    We're not talking about MY rules. We're talking about copyright law as it currently exists. Additionally, we're talking about those offering a service being allowed to set the terms of sale. You already have a right to deny participating in said transaction. Why should you be granted the right to further dictate terms in regards to the labor of another?

    Put it another way. Say you want to mow my lawn for 10 dollars. I tell you I will pay you 5 dollars. This isn't something you find agreeable. Should I be allowed to force you to work under my terms

    As for the question of abolishing law altogether? No thank you.

     

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  89.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 8th, 2011 @ 11:09pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    "I don't find your promise that books will continue to be written sufficiently compelling on it's own."

    So you don't think that books will continue to be written without copy'right'? I find that absurd.

    "please expand on how exactly we can be ensured that the current artistic output would be maintained without copyright - assuming that tis what you are implying."

    That's not what I said. Even if less content is created, those content creators still have to find other ways to contribute to the economy to make money and so they will find other jobs and hence contribute to the economy elsewhere. It's really not the governments job to subsidize content creation with these laws because that takes away from marginally (though not absolutely) more important activities elsewhere.

    Even if there are fewer jobs created as a result of abolishing these laws, job creation isn't an end in itself. Digging a hole and filling it back up is a job, but it doesn't necessarily add anything beneficial to the economy. The purpose of having an economy is to produce things and artificially diverting more labor towards content creation, for instance, isn't going to create more food (it may even divert labor away from food creation). It's not the governments job to artificially choose where labor should be diverted to. The free market is better at that.

    If the cost of creating a piece of content is worth the benefit of consuming it, people will find ways to fund its creation. Otherwise, the total cost of production is not worth the total benefit of production and so it should not be produced. Instead, the labor hours should go elsewhere in the economy. If you want the content created badly enough, you can fund it yourself and pay what you want.

    In the case of the existence of copy'right' the cost also includes the cost of enforcement, which adds economic inefficiency, an economic inefficiency that could otherwise divert resources towards more content creation or wherever else the economy demands labor to be diverted to if that inefficiency were eliminated. The cost also includes the economic inefficiency caused by the time and effort required by each person and entity to determine what is and what isn't infringement, and these days you often have to be a psychic to know. No, it's not worth it to me. My right to copy whatever I please as I please when I please without having to worry about such things (or to hire a psychic to tell me) is worth more to me than the cost of whatever content gets lost as a result of copy'right' abolition. I'm willing to take that risk and to deal with any doomsday consequences that one maybe speculating even in the highly unlikely event that any of them are true.

    The fact that people have to magically know what is and what isn't infringement encourages them to license content at a fee instead of obtaining permissibly licensed content because if they obtain permissibly licensed content and it turns out not to really be permissibly licensed, they can get sued. For example, see

    http://www.techdirt.com/articles/20110319/00355113560/if-you-think-writing-free-undermines-yo ur-profession-just-dont-do-it.shtml#c381

    This also discourages the production of freely available content since content production often require consumption and with less consumers you will have less producers (since many producers of freely available content can find other ways to fund their content, ie: perhaps via donations or charging for concerts or other things. but they can't as easily do that if everyone is afraid of consuming their content). This can also encourage people to nefariously upload content under a CC license and later sue those who consume it while claiming that they aren't the one who uploaded it. Again, this discourages content consumption and hence production. Without copy'right' we don't have these problems.

    If you want the current artistic output to continue, you can voluntarily fund it on your own by paying whatever you like for content. You can get a bunch of your friends to join you. If enough people join you, the content you like will be funded. But don't require others to subsidize the content creation of your choice by requiring them to expend the time and effort necessary to comply with and enforce these laws.

    When it comes to music, most musicians didn't/don't even make most of their money through CD sales. They made/make their money via concerts. The only reason why they need a record label is because corporate interests wrongfully control the information distribution channels (ie: public airwaves, cableco infrastructure) necessary to efficiently distribute the content and acquire an audience and those corporate interests don't distribute content that they don't have the 'rights' over. But content has been created without copy'right' in the past and, thanks to the better information distribution of today, plenty of content is created today under licenses designed to circumvent copy'right' at least to some extent. and in places that don't respect these laws as much, plenty of content is still created (as has been shown on tecddirt elsewhere).

     

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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 8th, 2011 @ 11:11pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    "Additionally, we're talking about those offering a service being allowed to set the terms of sale."

    and that's fine. But say someone broke their end of the bargain and gave me a copy of that song. I never agreed to anything and so I can keep that song and make as many copies as I please and distribute them as I please and there is absolultely nothing morally wrong with that on my end. Your problem isn't with me, since I agreed to nothing, your problem is with my friend who broke his/her agreement with you.

     

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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 8th, 2011 @ 11:15pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    So then are you saying that a system can work without copy'right'? If so, then the better to get rid of these laws.

     

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    Memyself, Apr 8th, 2011 @ 11:15pm

    "So you don't think that books will continue to be written without copy'right'? I find that absurd."

    That's not what I said at all. I clearly stated that I do not find your word (as presented at that time) sufficiently compelling on it's own, and asked you to expand.

    I stopped reading your post after you made the above comment. I don't appreciate others putting false words in my mouth.

     

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    Chosen Reject (profile), Apr 8th, 2011 @ 11:16pm

    Re:

    Are you going to start paying Isaac Newton for his contributions to society? How long will you continue to shirk your moral financial responsibilities to Bach's estate? Why aren't you still fulfilling your monetary obligations to Shakespeare?

    If you are going to make a moral argument for intellectual property, please tell us how long this moral compunction should last. Why should it have an end? If you morally deserve protection, shouldn't you morally always have that protection? Why should our moral obligations to George Romero fall by the wayside simply because the Walter Reade Organization screwed up? Who deserves more morality, Kutiman, or the people whose samples he made into a song? Why does Disney deserve protection for its transformation of Rudyard Kipling's work, yet we give no protection to Rudyard Kipling for his untransformed work? And especially why does Disney deserve it when they explicitly waited for Jungle Book to lost those protections before making their movie?

    There is no morality argument here. If the current length is correct, then shouldn't we retroactively tell Disney they owe Rudyard Kiplings estate? Shouldn't we put Night of the Living Dead back in George Romero's hands?

     

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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 8th, 2011 @ 11:16pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    Needless to say, that is true. But he wants it to be a moral issue. So instead of his false dilemma, I've offered him the opportunity to present a real one, and we'll see how I do.

     

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    Memyself, Apr 8th, 2011 @ 11:20pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    Of course a system can work without copyright. Work is distributed without copyright all the time. But that is a choice the creator gets to make. Taking that option out of the hands of the artists does not seem reasonable to me.

     

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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 8th, 2011 @ 11:21pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    It's not your website. I don't believe you have the power to copyright material on it in any way that would prohibit access to others or that would allow you to monetize the site to your own benefit.

    Actually, this is a legal gray area, at least in the United States. If you write a post, you hold the copyright on the post. It is unclear what rights you have transferred to Techdirt by hitting the post button. If you tried to sue Techdirt for then making your post available to the entire world, you would have a case, but it's unlikely that it would be worth your time. However, it's unclear what they would find.

    My best guess is that they would assert that this is a case of fair use. Who knows what the rationale would be. Fair use is broadly-enough defined that if a judge says something is fair use after considering the four factors, it is. The Betamax decision, for example, established that time-shifting is fair use, but the rationale seemed mostly to be a judgment call rather than a strict application of the four factors.

    Most websites make an effort to reduce this uncertainty by posting a terms of use somewhere that establishes what the website expects the license on posts to be. Generally you grant the website some kind of perpetual non-exclusive license to republish your post in various formats. Whether or not (or to what extent) these terms of use are enforceable is a different story, but I can guarantee they would figure in any court case that were to come up.

    Mike chooses not to reduce this uncertainty by publishing terms of use for your posts, so the uncertainty remains. While he can put whatever he creates into the public domain, I don't think he has unilaterally done so for our posts. He could post a terms of use document that says that anything you create and post on the website is contributed to the public domain as a condition of posting, and this would reduce uncertainty further, but he hasn't done that.

    It would be interesting to see whether a court would find terms of use that gave everything a non-exclusive license more or less enforceable than terms of use that put everything into the public domain. Can a website operator make a reasonable argument that you should be required to allow work you post to be shown on their website? Sure. Exploited by them in certain ways? Probably. Given away to be exploited by other, unaffiliated people? Hmm...

     

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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 8th, 2011 @ 11:22pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    Gah, car analogies. A pick:

    Cars don't just get made. They are also developed, engineered, designed, tested, perhaps for years, prior to getting made. They are technical and creative endeavors, like many an artform.

    On topic: most people would not take a physical book without paying for it. It is a well understood offensive act. Most people would happily borrow a book from someone who had paid for it. Maybe they'd even give it back someday, heh.

    Without a physical format, no one can take or borrow a digital file, it must be copied, whether purchasing is involved or not, there's no avoiding it.

    Relying strictly on payment for digital files that have no physical format, that literally cannot be borrowed or taken but only copied, for which it is a certainty that "unauthorized" copies will appear...it's a losing battle. It's actually preposterous to believe it won't happen or can be stopped, slowed, or shamed. It will happen, out of ignorance, apathy, ideology, by mistake. It is not an issue of morals but of simple human behavior.

    One might as well try to police our very thoughts, so ingrained is sharing in humans. Sharing equals communication, it is hardwired, it is how we learn...it is a main reason we create anything at all and decide to expose those creations to others. If we wish to not communicate, we don't. We keep secrets, we keep it to ourselves, we keep a civil tongue.

    Copyright, as it is these days, perverts and attempts to prevent such a basic human thing, sharing. That is a tremendous moral failure, in my opinion, but beyond this it is inevitable that it will be a Herculean task to stop anyone from sharing anything. Stricter laws haven't worked, neither will even stricter laws. The laws of human behavior will always win out.

    Because copyright is a wholly UNnatural thing for humans to follow, dependence upon it is a false security, doomed to be violated at any time. It attepmts to impose morality upon the simple acts of seeing, hearing, speaking, showing. It's actually grotesque when you think of it that way, but too many want to use it to do exactly that.

    I believe it's better to focus on how to earn a living from artistic endeavors as if copyright did not exist...

    ...but since it does, probably get sued someday for something. These days copyright's value lies mainly in lawsuit ignition, seems. What a shitty, artless way to generate revenue, huh?

    /ramble

     

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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 8th, 2011 @ 11:22pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    Furthermore, not all agreements should be enforceable by law. Many states don't enforce non-compete clauses. Maybe I also believe copy'right' is one of those agreements that shouldn't be enforced. Companies shouldn't be allowed to sell licenses to listen to a song, they must be forced to sell rights to redistribute the song and make and redistribute derivatives as they please. I don't want any of my taxpayer money enforcing these laws (via the court system or otherwise) and taxpayers should have a right to determine which laws their tax dollars and their tax funded government should and shouldn't enforce. I don't want these laws. They abridge my right to copy as I please and they make me have to go through the trouble of magically determining what's infringement and what's not before making a copy of anything. I'm not psychic, I don't have the money to hire a psychic, and I don't really believe psychics work. I also don't want copyright content displacing permissibly licensed content over public airwaves, airwaves that the government really has no business granting monopoly powers on. If less content is created as a result, so be it. I'll live.

     

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    Chosen Reject (profile), Apr 8th, 2011 @ 11:25pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    Then you need to read up on copyright law. Techdirt allows the posting of comments. US copyright law says that your work is copyrighted "the moment it is created and fixed in a tangible form that it is perceptible either directly or with the aid of a machine or device". There is no ToS here that tells me otherwise, so I own the copyright to all my posts (same as you do yours). Nor have I seen anywhere where Mike or Floor64 says we can't monetize our content on techdirt.com. Then again, that wouldn't be a copyright issue, that would be a ToS issue, which is complete separate and independent.

    In either case, I'm not prohibiting access to my post. You are free to copy it as much as you want for all I care. I simply ask that you pay me to read it. You have no legal obligation to do so (as I've stated multiple times). You only have a moral obligation to do so if and only if your morals dictate that it is immoral to take without payment that which is offered for sale.

     

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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 8th, 2011 @ 11:26pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    and I don't want to risk getting sued for $150,000 or whatever because I downloaded (and maybe even perhaps I publicly played) a song that I thought was released under a license that allows me to do that only to find out that it really wasn't. and I don't want service providers to have to go through the trouble of figuring out what is and what isn't infringement, because they will only roll those costs back down to me somehow (and many services that I can benefit from may not even be able to afford to exist as a result of having to tolerate such a burden). It's simply not worth it to me.

     

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    Memyself, Apr 8th, 2011 @ 11:27pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    The song in question is still being sold under specific conditions. If you choose to acquire the song without meeting the terms of sale, you're still in violation of those terms. If you choose to redistribute the song you're still in violation of those terms.

    A plea of ignorance to the law in this matter certainly can carry some weight - for the truly ignorant. You are clearly aware that the terms exists and you are clearly aware how the terms apply. By circumventing payment and by redistributing, you are still making yourself a participant in the transaction - and then violating the terms that you clearly understand.

    To be clear with what I am about to say: I am not equating copyright violation with theft or any other specific crime or infraction. Copyright violation is copyright violation. Analogies are rarely 100% and are only meant to suggest rather than draw perfect parallels. That said - The getaway driver didn't rob the bank. He's still a participant. Your defense of innocence is a poor one.

     

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    Jay (profile), Apr 8th, 2011 @ 11:29pm

    But I only have..

    But I can only pay in cookies The $5 would bankrupt me. Won't you please think of the children?

     

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    Bleh, Apr 8th, 2011 @ 11:30pm

    Re:

    You're apparently not familiar with the nature of capitalism. It's all about getting something that you didn't fully pay for. Buy low, sell high. Pay the cheapest possible wages for labor, cut costs where you can like quality and safety, charge as much as you possibly can regardless of consideration for anything but profit, and hide as much of it as you can from the government because, by god, you earned that profit!

    As soon as the wealthy start paying back to society the wealth they have extracted at the expense of the rest of society, they and their advocates will have to forgive my inability to pretend that they have any moral high ground from which they can preach about thinking you're entitled to benefit from someone else's labor.

     

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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 8th, 2011 @ 11:30pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    "Why should there be only one way"

    You're assuming that without copy'right' there is only one way.

    "Why should every artists be required to sell according to your rules?"

    A: an artist isn't required to sell anything. S/he can find another job instead.

    B: If people want the artists work bad enough, the artist can find ways to monetize his work. Otherwise, perhaps people simply don't want the artists work badly enough.

     

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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 8th, 2011 @ 11:32pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    "But that is a choice the creator gets to make."

    and I want that choice abolished.

    "Taking that option out of the hands of the artists does not seem reasonable to me."

    Why should I care what seems reasonable to you?

     

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    Nicedoggy, Apr 8th, 2011 @ 11:33pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    Tricking others is exactly how I see artists saying they are "selling" something and claiming after that they are really "renting" those things.

    Or when you people say that IP is like real property and keep trying to compare it to real things and when the obviously retort comes back that if real property was anything like imaginary property we would have a absurd world, you people go back and claim that imaginary property is different.

    All smoke and screens to hide the fact that imaginary property is a imaginary construct that can't be enforced, that produces absurd results and doesn't work that well when applied to the general population and try to shame people with misleading statements about morals that have no ground in reality but only in the fertile imagination of the speaker that try to create connections where there are none.

     

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    Chosen Reject (profile), Apr 8th, 2011 @ 11:36pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    Wow. You wanted a morality based argument. And I quote:
    I think people simply expect that if they offer something for sale, that if people want it to consume it, they have to pay for it.

    If they don't want to consume it, walk away and don't pay anything.

    But don't think you're entitled to the benefits of having something that you didn't pay for.

    This is a simple and moral concept that I never see addressed here. I wonder why.


    You didn't pay me when I offered it for sale. This is a "simple and moral concept". I offered it for sale, you enjoyed its benefits, yet you didn't pay for it. I'd tell you how you already did, but you already know. By all means, try to publicly twist your way out of it by saying that since you have no legal obligation to pay that you don't have to (and really, you don't have any legal obligation to pay). But everyone here already knows where you stand. You stated that it was a "simple and moral concept". So are you going to pay up to gain your moral high ground, or are you going to admit that you are immoral by your own standards?

     

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    Nicedoggy, Apr 8th, 2011 @ 11:40pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    No, I also don't hear them trying to rent anything to me saying they are selling the stuff to me.

    What is not common is to have any further rights, I don't see the barber saying to me how I should wash my hair or which products I am authorized to use in his hair cut.
    I also don't see car manufactures claiming royalties from cabs do you?

    I also don't see them being able to stop me from manufacturing my own parts and putting on that car, I also don't see how they could possibly stop me from modifying that car?

    Now why can't you just ask the price for something and let it go?
    Why should people be forced to fallow your rules that are being imposed, not agreed like in a rental or something like that but imposed upon the consumer, how is that good?

     

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  109.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 8th, 2011 @ 11:40pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    B: If people want the artists work bad enough, the artist can find ways to monetize his work. Otherwise, perhaps people simply don't want the artists work badly enough.

    Without scarcity, demand for a work can be insanely high and that doesn't mean bupkus for the price of the good.

    Artists may be able to hold future work that has not yet been done for ransom, but why is it a good thing that people should pay for something that they have basically no way to predict the quality of?

     

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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 8th, 2011 @ 11:40pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    "If you choose to acquire the song without meeting the terms of sale, you're still in violation of those terms. "

    but there is nothing morally wrong with acquiring a song without meeting the terms. I never agreed to the terms. Even if you never agreed to have me copy your song, that's not your decision to make. Copying is a natural right that I have that exists outside of government and so there is nothing morally wrong with me making such a copy with or without your permission.

    "A plea of ignorance to the law in this matter certainly can carry some weight"

    We're discussing whether the law should exist, not whether I violated it or not.

    "He's still a participant. Your defense of innocence is a poor one."

    Again, we're not discussing whether I broke the law, we're discussing whether the law should exist to begin with. My argument is that it should not. I don't want this law to exist.

     

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  111.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 8th, 2011 @ 11:40pm

    Re: Quibble.

    Ideas can't be copyrighted. Your expression of them is.

     

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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 8th, 2011 @ 11:42pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    If the quality sucks people will stop paying for future work and the artist knows it. So s/he has incentive to make sure the quality is good.

     

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    Nicedoggy, Apr 8th, 2011 @ 11:43pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    Also for customers everywhere there is no "buying" option is either rent or rent, with one called sale and the other option rent.

    And one of those looks a lot like fraud to me, artists are tricking people into higher price renting without being told assuming that they bought something, when they hold no real rights to it apparently.

     

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    Nicedoggy, Apr 8th, 2011 @ 11:44pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    But to call it property and equate it to real theft in the real world then it is analogous and is perfect?

    I see.

     

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  115.  
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    MrWilson, Apr 8th, 2011 @ 11:44pm

    Re:

    You're confusing copyright with citation and proof of authorship.

    You can own the copyright to something you didn't write, so copyright is irrelevant to citation and you can create a clearinghouse that holds a record of publications to theoretically prove original authorship without copyright.

     

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    Chosen Reject (profile), Apr 8th, 2011 @ 11:50pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    Awesome.

    So by your own admission, ("I didn't read your post all the way through the first time") you did read my post.

    By your own admission ("I read the first line, chuckled and responded."), you don't actually know what you are responding to.

    There was no trickery. You stated it was a "simple and moral concept" to pay for something offered for sale if you're going to consume it. I stated in that post right up front that I was going to charge for reading it. There was no trickery involved. You failed it. You read it. You've lost the moral high ground. I have offered repeatedly how you may gain it back. Yet you don't. I can only assume that you are either morally bankrupt by your own standards, or that your standards are not what you publicly state them to be.

    In the meantime, while I have almost zero respect for copyright law as it stands, I still follow it as closely as I can. I have found that I'm a much bigger stickler for following copyright laws than anyone else I personally know. I've been in debates with friends and colleagues who make their living from copyright who violate it more often than I do, and who are regularly amazed at what copyright law really means (e.g., you can't copy that sheet music for the choir). If I have infringed on a copyright, it was by pure mistake. Your accusation is as false as your own publicly claimed standards.

     

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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 8th, 2011 @ 11:51pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    Notice how much verbiage you're using to try and make your case?

    Yes, I specified a moral argument and so did you want to keep it that way. I was explaining that to memyselfandI.

    But you presented a false dilemma to me. Do you have a real one?

    I already know that you can't charge me for something you write here. So I haven't lost any moral ground.

    You know that material you take is copyrighted and is supposed to only be for sale. Yes, you know that.

    See, I know you know the difference. And so does everyone else.

     

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  118.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 8th, 2011 @ 11:51pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    No, I also don't hear them trying to rent anything to me saying they are selling the stuff to me.

    They should stop that. They are, at best, selling you a license. However, if you understand copyright law at all, then you understand that you are buying a limited license. So you have minimal excuse to be angry.

    also don't see car manufactures claiming royalties from cabs do you?

    No, but if a car manufacturer wanted to be able to sell a car to a cab company at a substantially reduced price, but with royalties for use, I think they should be able to do that. They probably don't not because it's not possible, but because the car company doesn't want to risk losing money on a car just because the cab company doesn't use their car effectively. However, if the car company were convinced that more people would ride in cabs made by their company (because the car was ultra-luxurious, for example) then they might be incentivized to make such a deal with cab companies.

    I also don't see them being able to stop me from manufacturing my own parts and putting on that car, I also don't see how they could possibly stop me from modifying that car?

    Again, if they put that in the sales contract for the car, and you agreed to it, then why shouldn't they be able to do this? Let's say, hypothetically, that Toyota suspects that all these "unintended acceleration" cases were caused by aftermarket modifications using non-Toyota parts. The ones being damaged by that accusation are Toyota, and they would have an interest in minimizing these incidents. That would be an incentive to put a clause in their contract that says that no unauthorized modifications are to be made. If you don't like the contract, go buy a car from somebody else. If everybody has that in their contract, start your own car company without that clause.

    Now why can't you just ask the price for something and let it go?

    Some people get too attached to their work to let it go for any price. I would bet you that most artists would sell you the copyright on their work for some price. It will be substantially higher than the price for a copy. Why can't you just pay full price for a copyright, instead of paying for a copy? Once you own the copyright, you can put it in the public domain for everyone to enjoy.

    Why should people be forced to fallow your rules that are being imposed, not agreed like in a rental or something like that but imposed upon the consumer, how is that good?

    Those rules were agreed upon by your legislators that you elected. They are not "my" rules, they are "our" rules - they are as much your fault and responsibility as mine.

     

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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 8th, 2011 @ 11:52pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    Or, better yet, if you like copy'right' badly enough, you can voluntarily comply with it by paying whatever the artist asks you to pay for his content after the artist has released his content. Or generously donate to that artist to thank him/her for the content s/he has already produced. If you can get enough of your friends to voluntarily comply with your copy'right' ideology, then the artist can continue to create good content and get paid for it. but don't force everyone to comply with your ideology.

     

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    Nicedoggy, Apr 8th, 2011 @ 11:52pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    Why anyone should have the power to impose deals onto others?

    Your analogy would be better if I had the power to say to you that only I could mow the lawn and you would have to pay me whatever I ask or not mow the lawn at all.

    Copyright is not an agreement is an imposition, we didn't agree on the terms voluntarily you are forcing me into the deal and saying take it or leave it.

    The funny part, you don't even has the power to stop me just as I would never have the power to stop you from mowing your own lawn, but you still persists.

    About the abolishment of copyrights you don't have a say on it. If people choose to ignore it you have no power to make them comply.

     

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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 8th, 2011 @ 11:55pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    And one of those looks a lot like fraud to me, artists are tricking people into higher price renting without being told assuming that they bought something, when they hold no real rights to it apparently.

    Ignorantia juris non excusat.

     

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    Nicedoggy, Apr 8th, 2011 @ 11:57pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    It should not be a choice, nobody else gets a choice in how their works ends up.

    Artists should just produce, receive their payment and have no further claims on it.

     

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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 8th, 2011 @ 11:58pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    Copyright is not an agreement is an imposition, we didn't agree on the terms voluntarily you are forcing me into the deal and saying take it or leave it.

    You agreed on the terms when you were born in, or moved to, a country with copyright law. Along with zillions of other terms.

    Would you also abolish the "impositions" that likely benefit you? Would you repeal Magnuson-Moss? I certainly do not hear you complaining about it.

     

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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 12:00am

    Re: Re:

    Can you explain how someone can claim ownership of something they either did not create or find first?

     

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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 12:03am

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    Artists should just produce, receive their payment and have no further claims on it.

    They can do that. Copyright gives them an additional option, which is more efficient: they can elect to take more risk and sell copies at a substantially-discounted price. This allows more flexibility in who takes the risk. If you have to buy art outright, then the consumer takes all the risk. If you sell copies, the artist can take more of the risk. It also permits things like albums of music and multi-million line pieces of software and makes them available for pennies while still compensating the creators (or the risk-takers to whom they have sold their work).

    You want a world that is far less efficient, I see.

     

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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 12:03am

    Re: Re:

    No one is harassing anyone for something they purchased. They are harassing people that break the license that came with that purchase or the people that don't pay anything at all, yet still feel entitled to consume.

     

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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 12:10am

    Re: Re:

    Because the author is misguided...

     

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    Dave, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 12:10am

    Nested Commets

    I really prefer nested comments, but when we get this far into a discussion, it looks silly to have each word on its own line. :P

     

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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 12:10am

    Re: Re:

    Monopolies cost time and money to enforce

    Quality content costs time and money to create.

    If you don't want to pay me for my work, then don't avail yourself to my labor. That's a simple contract that society follows, in case you haven't noticed.

    And you obviously value it a great deal, as you are so addicted to it that you must obtain it illegally.

     

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    Dave, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 12:15am

    Re: Re: Re:

    That's just silly. US Govt owns most of North America. We didn't create it or find it first, either.

     

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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 12:15am

    Re: Re: Re:

    "or the people that don't pay anything at all, yet still feel entitled to consume."

    No one is entitled to a monopoly on anything.

    I'm not entitled to the air I breath. It's my right to breath it. It's my right to copy as I please.

     

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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 12:16am

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    My argument is that it should not. I don't want this law to exist.

    I don't want the law to exist that makes it illegal for me to repeatedly kick you in the balls.

    How about we call it even and proceed?

     

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  133.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 12:20am

    Re: Nested Commets

    It boggles my mind that this site uses custom software to the extent that it seems to. It would seem that rendering your fans' posts one word per line would be a really shitty way to CwF and build community, but that's just me.

     

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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 12:23am

    Re: Re: Re:

    "Quality content costs time and money to create. "

    So?

    "If you don't want to pay me for my work, then don't avail yourself to my labor."

    A: Don't tell me what to do. If you don't like me copying your work then find another job.

    B: If you don't want me to have your content without paying then I won't consume your content period and you won't get paid. I'll respect your wishes, and so would many others, but I do not want the law to enforce your specific wishes.

    "And you obviously value it a great deal, as you are so addicted to it that you must obtain it illegally."

    I do not obtain it illegally. I do follow the law.

    "That's a simple contract that society follows"

    I never agreed to this contract and I want it abolished.

    "in case you haven't noticed."

    I think most of society doesn't follow it and hasn't followed it in the past. Ie: see China. It's an imposition that the government wrongfully imposes on us, it's not a contract that I ever agreed to.

     

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  135.  
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    G Thompson (profile), Apr 9th, 2011 @ 12:24am

    Re:

    I agree.
    If something is offered for sale than it is up to the consumer/market to either accept that offer, negotiate a better one, or refuse it.

    That is basic common sense and I don't see anyone saying different here.

    Though having sold the item in question after the acceptance was done by the purchaser what copyright is then allowing the offerer to do is change the terms of that offer after acceptance has occurred.

    Say I you bought an item 50yrs ago. At that time you were under the absolute knowledge that in 50yrs time or so that item would be out of copyright and you could then do WHATEVER you wanted with it.

    40yrs later all of a sudden the offerer goes running to the government sobbing and creating FUD screaming that they require more money from things they had already sold. THE DESERVE IT. They are struggling artists/publishers/fraudsters/whatever and they cannot survive and neither can their silver spoon fed offspring without the terms of the ORIGINAL SALE being changed retrospectively.

    So, I am now left with an item that is valueless to me under one of the the original conditions of why I purchased it in the beginning.

    But hey lets not talk about forfeiture of contract, unconscionable behaviour, estoppel, fraud, etc because its all about copyright.. its different.. *eye roll*

    Think of the artists and what they deserve.

     

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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 12:25am

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    So you're comparing infringement to violence?

     

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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 12:28am

    Re: Re: Re: Re:

    Since you never agreed to many things, do you pay taxes? Do you drive on public roads? Do you have automobile insurance? Do you sneak through airports to get around security?

     

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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 12:31am

    Re: Re:

    Retroactive copyright extension is the anti-IP crowd's titanic red herring. The actual practical effect of this in your personal life is what? If we got rid of it, would you shut up? Seriously, you can have the Wizard of Oz and the shitty-looking version of Mickey Mouse if you do.

     

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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 12:35am

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    I'm pointing out how ludicrous it is to want to abolish a law because it happens to be an annoyance to you.

    Particularly one that was written to protect someone else's personal rights.

     

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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 12:35am

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    You're right, comparing infringement to violence isn't fair. How about you get two laws repealed: say, copyright and marijuana being illegal. Then we get the law repealed that stops us from kicking you in the weenus. Is that more fair?

     

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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 12:36am

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    Anti violence laws make sense. I agree with them for a variety of reasons.

    I disagree with copy'right' laws because they violate my inherit right to copy what I please when I please and I disagree with them for the many reasons I listed above as well (along with other reasons).

    We were discussing copyright laws and whether or not they should exist. You were on the right track for a while. Then, when you seemed to have no response to me pointing out that me violating a contract that I never agreed to by copying something isn't a breach of contract on my part, you went off into how it's still illegal. I'm not disagreeing with you that it's illegal, I'm making an argument that it shouldn't be illegal. It still doesn't violate your right to make contracts with others, but if they break their end of the deal, then your problem is with them, not with me who agreed to nothing and made a copy. The law disagrees, but that's irrelevant, being that the discussion is about whether the law should be changed.

     

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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 12:42am

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    But if you piss me off, you have violated my right of serenity and the only way I can be made whole again is to kick you in the weenus.

    For the record I have never once agreed to any stipulation not to kick you in the weenus. You have no reasonsble justification why I should be bound by this restriction on what I can and can't do in my personal life, especially after fucking with my serenity.

     

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  143.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 12:43am

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    "I'm pointing out how ludicrous it is to want to abolish a law because it happens to be an annoyance to you."

    Lets make it a law to require everyone to punch you in the mouth every day. You say you want that law abolished because it's an annoyance to you? How ludicrous.

    "Particularly one that was written to protect someone else's personal rights."

    Preventing me from copying isn't their right. The law doesn't protect a right that existed to begin with, it created a legal right that doesn't belong. You made the argument that abolishing copy'right' can interfere with your ability to make contracts with others. When I pointed out that this is not true, you changed the subject by going off into how it may not be breach of contract for me to copy something without agreeing to the contract, but it's still against the law. But that's irrelevant being that we're discussing whether the law should exist to begin with. That's what you seem to be missing here.

     

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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 12:45am

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    Good for you for being such a stickler for copyright law. I indeed do not have any higher moral ground than you.

    If you want to give me an addy, I will indeed send you a fiver. You deserve it.

    cheers

     

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  145.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 12:49am

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    Now you're just trolling.

    No one is arguing that just because I didn't agree to a law, the law shouldn't exist. What I'm arguing is that just because something is a law doesn't mean the law should exist and I'm providing multiple reasons why copy'right' is one of those laws that shouldn't exist. You haven't addressed any of those reasons.

     

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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 12:51am

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    In caveman times, cavemen settled disputes by kicking each other in the weenus. Therefore, you have no natural right to state-sponsored weenus protection. The law has created a 'right' for you where none exists. And you hide behind it dutifully. Sadly, it has not created a similar state-sponsored protection on my serenity, likely because of extensive lobbying by the weenus-protection industry.

    There is no logical reason for this. If my serenity is fucked up, it will cause thousands of dollars in damage to society because I won't be able to concentrate at work for days. If you get kicked in the weenus, you will be back at work on Monday. It is also less likely that you will have children. Children put more of a strain on the environment than nearly anything else, so fewer children is a good thing.

    Are you some kind of shill for the weenus-protection lobby? You are, aren't you?

     

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  147.  
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    G Thompson (profile), Apr 9th, 2011 @ 12:57am

    Re: Re: Re:

    It's not a red herring, in fact its an absolute breach of contract law.

    You know that actual base precedent law that has been around since before the USA was a republic and is the foundation of all transactions in commerce everywhere in the world nowadays.

    Contracts cannot be retrospectively changed without full consent of all parties to the contract.

    Contracts of Sale on the other hand cannot be changed at all since once the sale has been finalised the contract has been completed and therefore NO variation on terms of that contract can be changed by any party since there is no longer an actual contract. Though there is a contractual agreement and caveat on the ORIGINAL INSTANCE of sale

    If copyright law had been extended with the priviso that it will only affect copyrightable items that had been created AFTER the extension had been passed into law then we wouldn't be having this major problem we currently do.

    But alas, artists need to feed their families for stuff they did when they were alive or decades before, that had already been sold for some sort of value. They deserve it.. whereas if I did the exact same thing to artists and retrospectively had the law changed that the original sale of their item was now TAXED differently and that either they or their extate had to pay it NOW all hell would break loose..

    Tell me, what is the difference between my proposal to retrospectively Tax the original sale, and what artists (and their agents) currently have allowed to happen? Since one could equate retrospective copyright extension as a ' private tax/fee'

     

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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 12:59am

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    You're replying to someone else's post here for the most part.

    But as far as the part that I wrote, basically you don't believe intellectual property is real. I've pointed out many times such a notion is essentially Marxism; a philosophy that has been proven to be unworkable.

    Get some sleep. Your kid is going to be up soon.

     

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  149.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 1:04am

    Re: Re: Re: Re:

    Yes, as I said, we will give you the retroactive copyright extension. You win. Please make all the Judy Garland/Glinda/Crazy-looking Mickey/Munchkin porno that you want. The question is, will you shut up after that?

     

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    G Thompson (profile), Apr 9th, 2011 @ 1:06am

    Re: Re: Re: Re:

    I just noticed, serves me right from reading TD chronologically in reverse [ Take that chinese time machine haters ;)] But there is a story down below this one that actually is talking about retrospective copyright ad why it is wrong and that Denmark is now doing it *sigh*

    Just wanted to point out that my comments above were not in response to ahveing read that article but are actually dealing with basic moral, ethical, and LEGAl reasonings on contract law and SALE of goods.

    Also it must be noted that this does NOT apply to licensed items of copyright since retrospective action can occur since the contract was NOT a contract of sale. Licensing is a whole new quandary

     

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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 1:13am

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    "There is no logical reason for this."

    Of course there is. If everyone were allowed to harm anyone else as they please, it could create a lot of violence and that's really bad for the public interest. Everyone would be far worse off. The logical reason for anti violence laws to exist is because we could all be far worse off without them. I would be much worse off and so would you.

    If people were allowed to copy each other as they please, the worst that will likely happen is that ..... (insert doomsday scenario here)

    I believe that everyone would be much better off without copy'right' laws. This includes myself. However, if it is true that I would be better off without these laws, then that suggests that it's true for most others. After all, I'm a member of society just like most others, why shouldn't what's good for me as a member be good for many and perhaps most other members as well? I'm explaining why I would be better off without these laws, and perhaps others would find that my reasoning for not wanting these laws also applies to them and so they would be better off. Laws exist to serve the public good, not to serve some special interests like the artists or record labels/publishers. This not only applies to physical property laws, they also apply to intellectual property laws. If it's true that copy'right' isn't in my best interest for reasons xyz and if others read those reasons and determine that they apply to them as well, and if it's true that the general public is worse off without these laws then with them, then we should abolish them.

    Much of it also has to do with what we value. I value my right to copy as I please more than I value the reduction of content, if any, that would be lost as a result of these laws being abolished. Different people value different things. I'm expressing my values and perhaps others would agree with my values as well after reading them. If it's true that others agree with me, then perhaps everyone would be better off without these laws being that what we collectively gain from their abolition is more valuable to us than what we lose.

    You're arguing that some artists might be better off with these laws. Irrelevant. People who dig holes and fill them back up for no reason would be better off if the government subsidized them. Advertisers would be better off if the government paid their advertisement bills. The laws shouldn't promote a specific class of workers and it shouldn't direct more people to join that class of workers, it should promote what's in everyone's best interest.

     

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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 1:20am

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    "I've pointed out many times such a notion is essentially Marxism"

    Where? How is it Marxism?

    The founding fathers initially did not believe in patents or copy'rights' but later allowed it under very limited conditions. There is nothing Marxist about their abolition. Their abolition requires less government, not more, and socialism/Marxism requires more government. I sense you're just making things up.

     

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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 1:23am

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    and if it's true that the general public is better off without these laws then with them *

     

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  154.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 1:25am

    Of course there is. If everyone were allowed to harm anyone else as they please, it could create a lot of violence and that's really bad for the public interest. Everyone would be far worse off. The logical reason for anti violence laws to exist is because we could all be far worse off without them. I would be much worse off and so would you.

    This is not true at all. If I were allowed to kick you in the weenus for messing with my serenity, you'd be a lot less likely to do it in the first place. That would, as I pointed out, save the economy thousands of dollars. If you persisted anyway, I would be able to kick you in the weenus, which would restore my serenity much faster at only a small cost to you, unless it messed with your ability to reproduce. As I said, that's also a good thing, because kids' carbon footprints are huge.

    If anti-violence laws did not exist, people would have to be a lot more polite to each other than they are now. It would be a massive improvement for all society. Fear of things like social shaming and getting kicked in the weenus would prevent people from offending each other much more broadly than a vague threat of a tort lawsuit that would never come to fruition.

    If people were allowed to kick each other in the weenus as much as they pleased, the worst that could happen would be to (insert doomsday scenario here).

    I believe that everyone would be much better off without weenus protection laws. This includes myself. However, if it is true that I would be better off without these laws, then that suggests that it's true for most others. After all, I'm a member of society just like most others, why shouldn't what's good for me as a member be good for many and perhaps most other members as well? I'm explaining why I would be better off without these laws, and perhaps others would find that my reasoning for not wanting these laws also applies to them and so they would be better off. Laws exist to serve the public good, not to serve some special interests like people who get off on messing with other people's serenity. If it's true that weenus protection isn't in my best interest for reasons xyz and if others read those reasons and determine that they apply to them as well, and if it's true that the general public is worse off without these laws then with them, then we should abolish them.

    Much of it also has to do with what we value. I value my right to serenity more than I value the reduction of weenus safety, if any, that would be lost as a result of these laws being abolished. Different people value different things. I'm expressing my values and perhaps others would agree with my values as well after reading them. If it's true that others agree with me, then perhaps everyone would be better off without these laws being that what we collectively gain from their abolition is more valuable to us than what we lose.

    You're arguing that some serenity-fuckers might be better off with these laws. Irrelevant. People who dig holes and fill them back up for no reason would be better off if the government subsidized them. People who punch themselves in the weenus would be better off if the government stopped them. The laws shouldn't promote a specific class of offenders and it shouldn't direct more people to join that class of offenders, it should promote what's in everyone's best interest.

     

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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 1:26am

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    Addendum: Pencil makers would be better off if the government granted them a monopoly on making and selling pencils.

     

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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 1:32am

    Re:

    "That would, as I pointed out, save the economy thousands of dollars."

    Thousands of dollars is pocket change. Even if it is the case that preventing you from harming others will cost the economy thousands of dollars, you're just an outlier. We'll simply put you in jail if necessary. Sure, jails cost money, but it's worth putting you in jail.

    In the case that the government requires me to make sure that piece of content I come by doesn't infringe, I'm no outlier. The social costs are much greater.

     

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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 1:33am

    Re: Re:

    In the case that the government requires me to make sure that every piece of content *

     

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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 1:38am

    Re: Re:

    Thousands of dollars is pocket change. Even if it is the case that preventing you from harming others will cost the economy thousands of dollars, you're just an outlier. We'll simply put you in jail if necessary. Sure, jails cost money, but it's worth putting you in jail.

    If thousands of dollars are just pocket change, why don't you send me a few grand?

    You're now just making things up. You're just making an inane moral argument. The economics of the situation are clear: it is FAR better for society as a whole if I am allowed to kick you in the weenus. Sure, it might be a small cost for you in the short term, but there are massive benefits for everyone else that far outweigh any tiny impingement on your life that might occur. The thousands of dollars in direct savings are just the tip of the iceberg: think of the savings in police, lawyers, jails, etc.

     

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  159.  
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    The eejit (profile), Apr 9th, 2011 @ 1:39am

    Re: Re: Re:

    Food, clothes, morality, ethics.

    Just to name a few.

     

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  160.  
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    Togashi (profile), Apr 9th, 2011 @ 1:42am

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    The entire point of this article is that it is NOT the government's problem whether copyright ensures the artist can recoup costs. Even if it were, life plus 70 years is entirely ridiculous. I can't find any numbers right now, but I know at some point a book will make back what it took to produce, and past that anything more is pure profit. Could the majority of books recoup costs in 5 years? 10? If anyone knows of some research they could post, that would be great.

    Copyright is about protecting the interests of the people, not creators. Content creators complain about the "entitlement" problem they see people as having, where we feel that eventually their works should add something to society. Do they not suffer the same entitlement problem for feeling that their work, even if it took them 3 years to create, should by law be a nest egg for them, their children, and perhaps their grandchildren, depending on how long they live?

     

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  161.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 1:42am

    Re:

    "That would, as I pointed out, save the economy thousands of dollars. "

    Besides, none of what you're saying is true and you know it. I said nothing offensive and so you are really unlikely to be offended enough by any of it to harm me. and even if you would had it been legal, I highly doubt that it's illegality has caused you to stop working and hence cost the economy thousands of dollars. The difference is that what you're saying isn't true and you know it. You're arguing for something that you believe to be false yourself. The economy hasn't been harmed thousands of dollars because you're not allowed to kick me. You're still working. and even if what you're saying is true, you're an outlier. We'll place you in jail.

    I'm arguing for what I believe to be true and am giving reasonable explanation for my arguments. You haven't addressed any of them.

     

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  162.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 1:44am

    Re: Re:

    explanations *

     

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  163.  
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    The eejit (profile), Apr 9th, 2011 @ 1:45am

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    Ignorance is no excuse? Then I suppose that Senators Hatch, Leahy and co. can be charged with treason, seeing as they're pissing on the Constitution.

     

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  164.  
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    The eejit (profile), Apr 9th, 2011 @ 1:46am

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    There's a certain...hypocrisy to that, isn't there?

     

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  165.  
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    Togashi (profile), Apr 9th, 2011 @ 1:46am

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    So make copyright a choice the creator has to consciously make if they want it. Things can default to the public domain, unless the creator specifically applies for copyright protections. That would make a lot of things easier for a lot of people.

     

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  166.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 1:46am

    Re: Re:

    You're still working. and even if what you're saying is true, you're an outlier. We'll place you in jail.

    I'm not working right now, instead I am doing all that I legally can to reclaim my serenity. It's not helping much, because what would really help is the ability to kick you in the weenus. But since I am hamstrung by terrible laws put in place decades before my birth by the powerful and corrupt weenus-protection lobby, I do what I can.

    You are the outlier. You and your small group of people that get off at going all over the place and fucking with people's serenity with impunity are the problem. You want special protection for your weeni so you can continue your campaign of terror. Jails are a weak-minded society's solution to solving personal problems, so of course you would advocate it. Everyone would be better off if I could just kick you in the weenus and be done with it.

    You are blinded by your devotion to your anti-serenity group, and have failed to make any cogent response to my perfectly logical arguments.

     

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  167.  
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    The eejit (profile), Apr 9th, 2011 @ 1:47am

    Re: Re: Re: Re:

    Nobody expects the Spanish Inquisition!

     

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  168.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 1:48am

    Re: Re: Re:

    * ostriches
    ** embryos

     

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  169.  
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    The eejit (profile), Apr 9th, 2011 @ 1:49am

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    No, yea, no, and yes. Simple, eh? Not been caught once. :p

    Oh, wait, you were serious.

     

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  170.  
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    Gotcha, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 1:53am

    Mike again liar, liar, pants on fire and marginalized.

    It's my right to copy as I please.

    Not in the USA, it isn't!!
    Here, it is your right to get your ass sued and pay lots of damages and perhaps get criminally punished if you copy as you please and a copyright owner or US Attorney decides your mistaken belief and resultant copying is significant enough to make it worth pursuing you. Since 1790 the Constitution has authorized Congress to enact laws granting exclusive rights to authors (and inventors) for limited times to "promote progess" of "the useful arts and sciences". Congress has done so. Therefore it is NOT your right to copy as you please.

    Until Tech Dirt intellectually bankrupt copyright thief posters get the requisite number of States to pass a constitutional amendment outlawing copyright (you are SOL on that one)or get Congress to repeal the Copyright Law (then states could just enact their own, and surely would, particularly where studios and publishers are.) your statement is a damn lie, and you know why.

    So you dolts are pissing in the wind and it is humorous to see over a hundred posts following Masnick misinformation and also peeing on themselves in this manner.

    Mike quotes Sanchez's erroneous statement:
    The only--the only--relevant question is whether a marginal restriction on the general ability to use information incentivizes enough additional information production over the long run to justify denying that marginal use to every other human being on the planet, whether for simple consumption or further creation.
    and then in dittohead style sycophant language says: "Exactly right."

    Actually, exactly wrong, and you know it Mike. Caught you lieing again. You know very well that copyright rarely denies marginal use, it denies non-marginal use. Marginal use is generally not worth pursuing so copyright owners tend to let it go. Non-marginal use, on the other hand tends to catch the attention of copyright owners and get stopped, if done in a jurisdiction like the US where copyrights are widely respected.

    Liar, liar, pants on fire, Mike. But then you are insignificant and marginal, so only worth a rare occasional verbal slap.

     

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  171.  
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    The eejit (profile), Apr 9th, 2011 @ 1:54am

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    Correction: communism is proven to not work. MArxism is a valid world theory, especially considering, for example, the GOP are obsessed with this 'class war' concept from Marxist inversion/perversions.

     

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  172.  
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    Togashi (profile), Apr 9th, 2011 @ 1:56am

    Re:

    I agree. Any time someone tries to argue with me that the death penalty exists for moral reasons, I look them in the eyes and say two words: "death penalty". Though of course, the response to that is usually something along the lines of "Well that's ok, because we should kill people who kill people because it's wrong to kill people."

     

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  173.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 1:56am

    Re: Re: Re:

    "If thousands of dollars are just pocket change, why don't you send me a few grand? "

    It's pocket change for society to pay it to keep you from harming others when compared to the costs of allowing you to freely harm others. Allowing you to freely harm others could cost the economy more.

    So are you arguing that everyone is better off without anti-violence laws than with them?

    Anti-violence laws exist because everyone is better off with them than without. Unless you're saying that we're worse off without them, their existence is justified. If Copy'right' is to exist, it also needs justification. Just like with anti-violence laws, copyright shouldn't be allowed to exist without justification. I'm pointing out some of the costs as a way to show that it's existence isn't all that justified.

    I'm arguing that everyone, including myself, is better off without copy'right' laws and I'm giving reasons why I think so. You haven't refuted any of them. If everyone is worse off without copy'right' than with it, then its existence isn't justified. Why should copy'right' be held up to a lower standard than anti-violence laws? Why should anti-violence laws require justification to exist but not copy'right' laws?

     

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  174.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 1:58am

    Re: Mike again liar, liar, pants on fire and marginalized.

    You're confusing natural rights with legal rights. Please read things in context. I am referring to natural rights.

     

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  175.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 1:59am

    Re: Re: Re: Re:

    So are you arguing that everyone is better off without anti-violence laws than with them?

    Absolutely. Anti-violence laws have made society soft and unable to resolve personal differences in an efficient and brutal manner. Even in the unlikely event that some anti-violence laws are a net positive for society, society would certainly be better off without a law that prevents me from kicking you, specifically, in the weenus.

    Anti-violence laws exist because everyone is better off with them than without.

    Prove it. You can't, because it's not true.

     

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  176.  
    identicon
    Anonymous Coward, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 2:00am

    Re: Re: Re: Re:

    "If everyone is better off without copy'right' than with it" *

     

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  177.  
    identicon
    Anonymous Coward, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 2:00am

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    Cellular*
    automata**

     

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  178.  
    identicon
    Anonymous Coward, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 2:04am

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    Most people value the lack of violence more than they value its allowance. We value the lack of violence more than the social and monetary cost of enforcing the laws that reduce such violence. We get more of what we value with these laws than without them. We are better off with them than without.

     

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  179.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 2:11am

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    Most people value the lack of violence more than they value its allowance. We value the lack of violence more than the social and monetary cost of enforcing the laws that reduce such violence. We get more of what we value with these laws than without them. We are better off with them than without.

    You're just making this up. You have no data to back this up. You have lived with "anti-"violence laws all your life, and so you think this must be the norm and that they are actually preventing violence. But they are not. How much violence do you see on the news? Tons. That is largely due to anti-violence laws having the opposite effect. Small-scale psychological violence (like you are perpetrating against my serenity) goes unpunished because it cannot be enforced by the state. You, and people like you, become emboldened by this, and then it escalates out of control.

    Here is a book that totally disproves your claims. Since your claims are now totally disproven, I assume you will drop your support of "anti-"violence laws.

    How many arrests for violent behavior have you read about from caveman times before these laws existed? How many cavemen do you know that were thrown in jail for homicide? They didn't even NEED jails. People settled issues like human beings. You are making up data to justify your campaign of emotional and psychological violence, which are protected because of your corrupt weenus-protection lobby.

     

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  180.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 2:12am

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    disestablishmentarianism isn't *
    the fractal nature of **

     

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  181.  
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    Nicedoggy, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 2:13am

    Re: Mike again liar, liar, pants on fire and marginalized.

    You are mistaken, not only people can do it, they do it with impunity all the time in the USA in special, further there is no way laws would forbid other from creating and releasing their own creations under permissive licenses creating legal alternatives to the copycrap that we have today, which means you have no choice but to accept what society decides not what the law says.

    If society decides they are better off looking at the licenses and choosing the free ones you and your copycrap are screwed.

    Can you change the laws to prohibit those licenses?
    That would be the day.

     

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  182.  
    identicon
    Anonymous Coward, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 2:14am

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    I value my legal ability to copy as I please more than I value whatever content I may lose as a result of copy'right' abolition. My value isn't unreasonable, especially when compared to your values in favor of allowing violence. I'm expressing my values and their reasons to others, perhaps so that they can evaluate these values and clearly define what they value as well. If most others determine that they value their legal ability to copy more than they value an artists ability to restrict us from copying and more than they value whatever lost content that may result, then society is better off without copy'right' than with it since we get more of what we value without it than with it. Does that make sense?

     

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  183.  
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    Togashi (profile), Apr 9th, 2011 @ 2:17am

    Re:

    You're making a couple assumptions here that I take issue with.

    1.) People are rational. If someone had the legal right to physically harm me for any reason at all, I would treat people no differently than I do now. I would, however, be eternally on my guard for people having a bad day and looking to take it out on someone, people who overreact to minor offenses, and whack jobs who just like hurting people.

    2.) People have similar resources and capabilities. If the law were changed as you say, I would be a lot more careful around people physically stronger than me, and they would have a lot less reason to care. Under your hypothetical scenario, if I insulted Arnold Schwarzenegger I would most likely not be having kids. But what incentive would I have not to insult the little old lady down the street, ignoring any moral compunctions I might have?

    3.) The abolition of anti-violence laws would save money. Let's see how the economy does when we get rid of laws keeping people civil and the next day half the workforce doesn't show up to work and the hospital systems are overwhelmed with thousand upon thousands of grievous injuries resulting from physical altercations sparked off by a silly insult.

    Your argument is similar to one where instead of seat belts we should have sharp metal spikes mounted on the steering column of every vehicle. Sure, in an ideal world it might make people drive more carefully and cut down on the amount of enforcement needed, but do you honestly believe that's going to happen?

     

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  184.  
    identicon
    Anonymous Coward, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 2:17am

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    I value my legal ability to kick people in the weenus as I please more than I value whatever security I may lose as a result of "anti-"violence laws. My value isn't unreasonable, especially when compared to your values in favor of allowing copyright infringement. I'm expressing my values and their reasons to others, perhaps so that they can evaluate these values and clearly define what they value as well. If most others determine that they value their legal ability to kick people in the weenus more than they value your ability to mess with my serenity and more than they value whatever lost security that may result, then society is better off without "anti-"violence laws than with it since we get more of what we value without it than with it. Does that make sense?

     

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  185.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 2:18am

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    Actually, I'm mostly against gun laws. and to the extent that anti violence laws cause unjustified violence (ie: not the violence used by the government to stop murder and enforce good laws) then they should be removed.

    But you yourself suggested that you won't kick me because I'll hide behind the laws, so doesn't that suggest that the laws are working?

     

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  186.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 2:20am

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    "And you hide behind it dutifully"

    So if I hide behind it dutifully, then it's protecting me right? It's working to reduce violence, right?

     

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  187.  
    identicon
    Anonymous Coward, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 2:21am

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    (otherwise, why would I hide behind it dutifully?)

     

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  188.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 2:22am

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    But you yourself suggested that you won't kick me because I'll hide behind the laws, so doesn't that suggest that the laws are working?

    So what you're saying is that laws work when enforced, and therefore we can reduce copyright infringement through much more stringent enforcement? Ah, I see now.

     

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  189.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 2:23am

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    I am really surprised you are in favor of increased/more draconian copyright infringement enforcement, that doesn't sound like you. It's honestly the first rational thing you've said today.

     

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  190.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 2:27am

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    "So what you're saying is that laws work when enforced"

    My point is that anti-violence laws work to serve a public good. Copy'right' laws work to serve a public disservice and so they should be abolished. See the difference.

     

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  191.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 2:29am

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    What?

     

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  192.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 2:31am

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    My point is that anti-violence laws work to serve a public good. Copy'right' laws work to serve a public disservice and so they should be abolished. See the difference.

    But MY point is that copyright laws work to serve a public good. "Anti-"violence laws work to serve a public disservice and so they should be abolished. Since I have the exact same argumentation you do, plus equal or more data than you to back up my argument, why should anybody listen to you and not me?

     

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  193.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 2:32am

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    Attention Techdirt advertisers: You, too, can reach ^^this^^ prime demographic.

     

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  194.  
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    Nicedoggy, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 2:32am

    Re: Re: Re:

    Yes I'm using TOR.
    Signing in is not going to happen sorry.

     

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  195.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 2:32am

    Re: Re: Re: Re:

    I don't what your parents were like, but those things were not offered for sale to me...

    but my condolences if that was your situation.

     

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  196.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 2:35am

    Just remember, trolls are under-served fans.

     

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  197.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 2:37am

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    or the Louisiana Purchase apparently...

     

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  198.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 2:41am

    Re: Re: Re: Re:

    It's my right to copy as I please.

    Says who?

    I like this idea of making up rules that work for yourself without consideration of anyone else.

    I've made up a new one too: I have the right to come over every morning and repeatedly kick you in the balls.

     

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  199.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 2:44am

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    "But MY point is that copyright laws work to serve a public good. "

    Not if the public values their right to copy more than they value allowing others to restrict them from copying.

    "But MY point is that copyright laws work to serve a public good. Since I have ... equal or more data than you to back up my argument"

    IP proponents always argue that everyone copies everything, that's data that suggests that people don't value the privilege of others to prevent them from copying so much and that they do value their right to copy. 95+ year copyprotection lengths are hardly intended to serve the public good which suggests that these copy'right' laws really aren't intended to serve the public good and if they're not intended to serve the public good, that suggests they don't. What data have you provided to support your argument that we are better off with these laws than without.

    "why should anybody listen to you and not me?"

    They should listen to both of us and decide what the laws should be partly based on what they personally value.

     

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  200.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 2:44am

    Re: Re: Re: Re:

    Don't tell me what to do. If you don't like me copying your work then find another job.

    Don't tell me what to do. If you don't want to pay for someone's labor but still want the end result...

    Do it yourself.

     

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  201.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 2:48am

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    Not if the public values their right to copy more than they value allowing others to restrict them from copying

    So if the majority of the public values the cheap labor of a minority race more than they value universal equality, they should be allowed to enact slavery laws?

     

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  202.  
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    Nicedoggy, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 2:49am

    Re: Re: Re:

    A license forced onto them, not agreed upon, not accepted by the two parties as a valid deal, not what people expected, thus not very compelling to be respected, more likely people will find a way around it that is legal until then piracy will reign supreme and we all know you can't do anything about it.

    That is why you get so upset, if it helps I don't pirate anything, I get my software from open source, my music from Jamendo, my video needs from Miro which allows me to search for specific licenses like CC Commons and books from Librivox.

    Well, I did copy all my DVD's to my NAS so technically I'm a pirate because it is against the law, but I'm not going to fallow that inside my own home with things that I have already paid for, no matter what the law says.

     

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  203.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 2:53am

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    "Says who?"

    The founding fathers for one. But that's irrelevant. No person said it, it's the fact that I can do it without government that makes it a natural right.

    "I like this idea of making up rules that work for yourself without consideration of anyone else."

    Copy'right' is a rule that works for IP maximists and with little consideration for others. IP abolition isn't a rule that works for me without consideration for someone else, it's the lack of a rule. I'm not making up rules that work for me without consideration of anyone else, you are, and I am saying that these made up rules shouldn't exist.

     

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  204.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 2:55am

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    "Don't tell me what to do."

    no one is telling you what to do. If you don't want to find another job ... I guess we have a welfare program for you. You don't have to find another job.

     

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  205.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 2:57am

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    They already have.

     

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  206.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 3:03am

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    Slavery is forced labor, you're forcing someone to do something against their will. Copy'right' abolition doesn't force anyone to freely produce anything, people can still refuse and find other jobs.

    and, no, they shouldn't be allowed to enact slavery laws, but a public that values their right to copy as they please isn't the same thing as a public that values their privilege to enslave others. Just because slavery maybe immoral doesn't make copy'right' infringement immoral.

     

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  207.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 3:08am

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    Peoples decisions aren't static, people change their minds, and perhaps after reading each others comments, people might change their minds

     

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  208.  
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    Nicedoggy, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 3:11am

    Re: Mike again liar, liar, pants on fire and marginalized.

    I just remembered that even the president(in 2005) of the USA is a dirty pirate.
    http://www.gearlive.com/index.php/news/article/suethepresidentcom_up_for_grabs_04191134/

    Not even presidents uphold the law anymore what a shame LoL

     

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  209.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 3:15am

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    I agree to pay taxes. I agree to drive on public roads. I agree to have automobile insurance. I agree not to sneak around security. Though I disagree with some of our current TSA security measures, I'll follow them if I have to. But I'll also seek to have them changed. Just because I disagree with a law doesn't mean I'll break it. I even avoid breaking copy'right' law, even though I don't agree with it. But my disagreement with it causes me to try and change such laws. It's not a contract I ever agreed to.

     

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  210.  
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    Nicedoggy, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 3:16am

    Re: Re: Re:

    I don't think you have paid attention to the last decades, because not even you could have uphold those laws and if you tell me you never pirated anything I will know you are just a liar.

    Mix tapes, VCR, Walkmans, Discmans, MP3 players, digital readers, photocopiers and so forth, at some point you violated the laws you don't want other to break now.

     

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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 3:17am

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    Heck, if anything, copy'right' forces me to go through the labor of determining what is and what isn't infringement if I download a song under the impression that it was released under a CC license or whatever. Sometimes such labor may even require being psychic, which I am not.

     

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  212.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 3:23am

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    The founding fathers for one.

    The founding fathers said nothing of the sort.

    This is easily the best thread in TD history. I set that shizz up on a tee, and you freetards hit it out of the park.

    Stoked that Victoria Espinel supposedly reads this site...

     

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  213.  
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    Nicedoggy, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 3:25am

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    I believe the labels are feeling the results of that line of thinking rather dramatically by now are they not?

    Meanwhile others are growing and having a blast on the market, have you visit Jamendo?

     

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  214.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 3:33am

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    "The founding fathers said nothing of the sort."

    I suspect you have been around techdirt long enough to know better and you are simply being disingenuous here.

    See

    http://movingtofreedom.org/2006/10/06/thomas-jefferson-on-patents-and-freedom-of-ide as/

    http://www.techdirt.com/articles/20080220/020252302.shtml

    http://rack1.ul.cs.cmu.edu/jeffe rson/

    and there are other quotes with the same type of language from them. The founding fathers were very skeptical of these laws and they did not consider them to be natural rights. They considered their absence to be the normal state of nature and thought that they should exist only to the extent that they promote the progress.

     

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  215.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 3:34am

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    Stoked that Victoria Espinel supposedly reads this site

    Really? If she reads the comments, it's likely this site has set back the anti-IP crowd back decades further than the most effective RIAA/MPAA lobbyist could ever have dreamed.

     

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  216.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 3:36am

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    (and not only can I and others provide several quotes supporting our position that the founding fathers didn't believe copy'right' to be a natural right, notice how IP maximists will fail to provide a single quote supporting their position).

     

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    Nicedoggy, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 3:45am

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    I'm also stocked, I hope she gets more stringent laws in place soon, because that would be a boom for legal free alternatives, that will welcome the refuges from the villain copyrights that we possess today and reflect in no way the moderation that men of virtue should pursue.

     

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  218.  
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    Nick Coghlan (profile), Apr 9th, 2011 @ 4:14am

    Re:

    Paid any money to Isaac Newton's estate lately? How about Albert Einstein's?

    I guess we can count ourselves fortunate that not everyone thinks the way you do.

    Still, you're missing the point that Mike has said many, many times that he agrees with you: if a copyright holder chooses not to make their works available the way you want to consume them, then the correct legal choice under the current system is to walk away.

    The reason many people don't walk away, and go for an illegal copy instead, is that they figure they're using their own resources (power, bandwidth, time) to create a new copy, rather than taking anything from anyone. Is someone taking a photo of the Eiffel Tower stealing it? Enjoying benefits they aren't entitled to? That's the kind of point of view you're railing against here.

    And that brings us to another point Mike regularly brings up: it doesn't have to be this way. Many artists have shown that you can give fans what they want (convenient access to your work) and still make a decent living. Probably not the obscene mega-profits of the winners of the current hit-based lottery systems, but certainly enough to sustain a comfortable middle-class lifestyle for the artist and their family.

    One way adds a lot of net misery to the human condition (artists stressing about people "stealing" their work, fans struggling to get their hands on the products of their favourite artists, law enforcement barging in on adolescents and grandmothers). The other way... doesn't. We can do better. We should do better.

     

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  219.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 4:33am

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    The problem with morals is they are fluid, based on religion, culture, upbringing and many other factors.

    I too have absolutely no moral compunction with copying something that is on sale elsewhere. Also, I honestly don't care if you morally object to my morals.

    This is the very problem with the moral argument - it's meaningless unless your personal morals coincide with the moral argument, which makes it self defeating because you will of course agree with your own morals.

    This is why you, and your paytard elk will always fail.

    Pathetic. Troll harder.

     

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    Liam (profile), Apr 9th, 2011 @ 5:00am

    So, is it morally acceptable to hold human culture to ransom, that's a fairly recent idea.

     

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  221.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 5:01am

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    I see language from Thomas Jefferson about 'ideas'; iow, he probably had issues with what we now know as patent law.

    I see nothing about the "founding fathers" saying people have a "right to copy"; taking an artistic work that is for sale without paying for it.

    The fact that you guys have to stretch and spin this hard says everything.

     

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  222.  
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    Liam (profile), Apr 9th, 2011 @ 5:21am

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    If this was a simple debate then the pro-copyright side wouldn't need to streth, spin and down right make up their facts and numbers.

     

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  223.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 5:24am

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    hey pal, I've trolled plenty hard enough today.

    The whole idea was to get people to verbalize the depth of their moral depravity, and everybody came through with flying colors.

    Having people voluntarily offer up numerous examples of why they are sociopaths and bloodsuckers was the plan all along.

    Now go feed your content addiction, little boy.

     

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  224.  
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    Richard (profile), Apr 9th, 2011 @ 5:37am

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    While I think that your stance is immoral, at least you are man enough to say exactly what your beliefs are.

    Your stance does not coincide with the morality of the Christian religion on which western civilisation was built

    If someone takes your cloak, do not stop him from taking your tunic. Give to everyone who asks you, and if anyone takes what belongs to you, do not demand it back. Luke ch 6.

    If that verse is true even for physical goods how much more is it true when the "taking" costs you nothing?

     

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  225.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 5:38am

    Re: Re: Re:

    The snowflake is to disentangle people who (like me) do not want to fill the "Name" field (Mike found it confusing to disentangle the dozens of Anonymous Cowards talking to themselves without it), but since he is filling the "Name" field on every post, his snowflake changing is not a problem.

     

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  226.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 5:48am

    Moral arguments

    Since this post's discussion is about moral arguments (Mike should have predicted it would happen...), let me present mine:

    Everything you "create" is a derivative of things other people "created" in the past. It is immoral to forbid other people from doing the same.

     

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    The Devil's Coachman (profile), Apr 9th, 2011 @ 6:07am

    Re: Mike again liar, liar, pants on fire and marginalized.

    Did you actually use the words "liar, liar, pants on fire" without attribution? It certainly looks that way to me. Doubtless you also did not obtain permission. In the interest of completeness, those words are part of the lyrics from a song created and performed by the Castaways and recorded in 1965. Those lyrics were in turn paraphrased from a poem by Blake. I believe they are copyrighted, and yet you chose to use them in your post without attribution or permission. I believe that makes you, sir, a hypocrite, and thus negates any and all validity to your point of view. You would be prudent to consult an attorney before the subpoena arrives at your doorstep.

     

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    harbingerofdoom (profile), Apr 9th, 2011 @ 6:10am

    Re: Re: Re:

    why.
    if you cant offer anything more than "you're wrong" and nothing to back it up.... then YOU my friend, are the one that is wrong.

     

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  229.  
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    harbingerofdoom (profile), Apr 9th, 2011 @ 6:11am

    Re: Re: Re: Re:

    your parents sold you food clothes morality and ethics?

    that must have been one helluva jacked up childhood.

     

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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 6:19am

    Uh . . .

    >>>This is why you, and your paytard elk will always fail.

    That's quite a question-and-antlers session . . .

     

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  231.  
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    harbingerofdoom (profile), Apr 9th, 2011 @ 6:22am

    Re:

    nice dodge.
    not even close to what the article was talking about... but kudos for the attempt and oh by the way, your post pretty much just proved one of the points of the article.


    as to your post itself:
    you can think all you want that if someone creates something and offers it for sale that it must be paid for.
    but dont think the world owes you a living just because you created something.

    your last sentence can only mean one of three things
    1. you dont actually read everything here
    2. you are stupid
    3. you are intentionally being misleading
    your moral crusade is addressed here all the time.

     

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  232.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 6:28am

    Re: Re:

    One word: Scarcity.

    The underlying principal of all economics is that for every satisfied want, there is an opportunity cost- Another want which cannot be satisfied due to limitations on resources. Price is a measure of scarcity; one must sacrifice more to obtain an expensive good than a cheaper good.

    Unlike a house, car, or piece of furniture, an item of "Intellectual Property", one created and available for distribution at no extra cost to the producer, is no longer scarce, as there is nothing that must be sacrificed to obtain the good. Because no scarcity exists, and price is a measure of scarcity, such goods should be available without cost.

     

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    blaktron (profile), Apr 9th, 2011 @ 6:33am

    Re: Re:

    Can I double vote insightful for this? This is the absolute core of the entire debate. Capitalism ALWAYS rewards the person who takes everything they want and need at the absolute lowest cost. In fact the entire thrust of our technological march forward is to make EVERYTHING cost less, towards zero. This has been the result of millions of job losses and the export of the entire manufacturing industry overseas. So if its OK for the legal fictions that own these copyrights to do this, why is it wrong for me to do this? All I'm doing when I copy a file 'illegally' is maximizing my profits and minimizing my costs.

     

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  234.  
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    Cipher-0, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 6:39am

    Why should I get a broadcast license?

    I know the answer from the "freetards" (You shouldn't) so I'd like to hear from the "IP-tards".

    Let's say I want to set up a local radio station. I've gotten an FCC license (or run a low-power station the doesn't require it), taken my purchased CD collection, burned them all to a SAN and broadcast 24x7x365. I've even managed to find local advertisers who want to buy blocks of time and add in my own commentary occasionally.

    Why should this radio station have to pay for an additional broadcast license? The music played is legitimately purchased. There's no demonstrable harm to the music producers, the artist or anyone else in the production chain.

    Of course, people listening can record the songs from the radio, but they're able to do that regardless of the licensing.

    Where is the harm to anyone beyond the producer's insistence they deserve extra money for what's (essentially, if not practically) free advertising for their artists?

     

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  235.  
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    blaktron (profile), Apr 9th, 2011 @ 6:44am

    Re:

    Also, books will be written without copyright, 100%. Books are tools, and thus will always be written. Some of the greatest books ever were written without copyright, so the idea that no books would be written without copyright is laughable. Copyright is young compared to both prose and music.

     

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  236.  
    identicon
    Anonymous Coward, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 6:51am

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    Hate to repeat myself, but there's a simple answer that applies to all goods, not just copyrighted goods...

    One word: Scarcity.

    The underlying principal of all economics is that for every satisfied want, there is an opportunity cost- Another want which cannot be satisfied due to limitations on resources. Price is a measure of scarcity; one must sacrifice more to obtain an expensive good than a cheaper good.

    Unlike a house, car, or piece of furniture, an item of "Intellectual Property", one created and available for distribution at no extra cost to the producer, is no longer scarce, as there is nothing that must be sacrificed to obtain the good. Because no scarcity exists, and price is a measure of scarcity, such goods should be available without cost.

     

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  237.  
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    aiming4thevoid (profile), Apr 9th, 2011 @ 6:58am

    Re:

    I usually hate analogies but maybe this will help:

    If you put your couch up for sale, and I want to buy it, AND we agree on the value of it, you get paid I get the couch.

    If I want to consume your ideas because I value them, I buy you a beer and become your friend. Then I have access to all your ideas for free. (yes, it reductive and cynical, but it will serve for the purpose)

    Added value only exist in the second case as the collision of our ideas can and usually ends up creating something that is greater that the some of its parts. This is what copyright keeps from happening and why its limitations can only be 'balanced' against the loss for society has a whole.

    Now if you want to sell your ideas, you have to prove first that they are worth buying... like everyone else. You don't deserve to get paid just cause you decided your ideas are worth something.

     

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  238.  
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    Ken (profile), Apr 9th, 2011 @ 7:28am

    Re:

    It is interesting how some argue that we have copyrights because artists DESERVE to be paid for their work. That is nonsense. Is copyright some kind of entitlement program for artists?

    No one in a business venture deserves anything. They must work to build a market for their creations. A market has two components supply and demand. Demand also has two components and that is how many people want the product and at what price they are willing to pay. For example if there is a high demand for your product but your price is very high then even though there is a high demand the actual market will be very low because only a few will be willing to pay that price.

    The Internet has created a dilemma in normal market forces of supply and demand. Normally in a real market when something is scarce it adds value to it especially when there is a large demand however the internet has made supply equal to demand, there will always be a download for every person that wants it. There is no scarcity which is always going to lower prices and will even tend to zero if that is where the market sets it.

    Copyrighters decry piracy but piracy is in fact a market unto itself. This market is actually separate from the copyrighter's market. Copyrighters claim they are losing billions to unauthorized copying but are they really? I would suggest no, because their market and the pirate market, for the most part, are separate and have very little overlap. People who buy or take bootlegs will not buy the legitimate item even if the bootleg was not available. On the flip side those that are willing to pay the asking price for the product are not the ones buying bootlegs. So even if the movie or music or software or what ever industry was to completely stomp out all illegal forms of distribution they will not see a significant increase in their revenues because the market for the bootleg items was never theirs and never will be.

     

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  239.  
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    Karl (profile), Apr 9th, 2011 @ 7:41am

    Re:

    But don't think you're entitled to the benefits of having something that you didn't pay for.

    This is a simple and moral concept that I never see addressed here. I wonder why.


    Funny you claim this, because it was addressed, point blank, in the article:
    We are all the massive beneficiaries of millennia of accumulated human scientific knowledge and cultural output, and not one of us did anything do deserve a jot of it. We're all just extremely lucky not to have been born cavemen. The greatest creative genius alive would be hard pressed to create a smiley faced smeared in dung on a tree trunk without that huge and completely undeserved inheritance.

     

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    Karl (profile), Apr 9th, 2011 @ 7:48am

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    one that was written to protect someone else's personal rights.

    Except, of course, this is not why copyright was written. It was written "to promote the progress," not to "protect the rights" of anyone.

    Those rights were granted to authors by the public, and it is primarily for the public benefit that those laws exist.

    The moment it does not benefit the public first and foremost, is the moment the laws need to be re-written.

     

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  241.  
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    Thwacht (profile), Apr 9th, 2011 @ 8:09am

    More utilitarian bullshit, more sophomoric arrogance. I swear, more and more lately, the zealotry here is enough to make me want to root for the RIAA and MPAA.

    And that wouldn't do, would it? So I'm on my way to remove the Techdirt gadget from homepage now. Had enough of the fucking rivers you guys keep crying.

     

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  242.  
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    Karl (profile), Apr 9th, 2011 @ 8:32am

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    I already know that you can't charge me for something you write here.

    By your own admission, we're discussing morality. So when you say he "can't charge you" for something he writes, either a) you believe it's immoral for him to charge for consuming his content, on his terms, or b) that your actions are not immoral solely because they are within the bounds of the law.

    If you believe a), then you're morally wrong by your own standards. If you believe b), then you believe that morality is dependent upon legality.

    So, there would be nothing immoral about repealing copyright in its entirety? That's the only way you could possibly be consistent here.

     

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  243.  
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    Karl (profile), Apr 9th, 2011 @ 8:43am

    Re: But I only have..

    Won't you please think of the children?

    You're in luck! For a one-time payment of your firstborn child, you will have lifetime access to all his comments. It's a steal!

     

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  244.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 8:45am

    This is all ridiculous. Fuck the artists. Period. I don't care whether they make six hundred billion or sixty bucks next year. Fuck them. If they want to make money, they should do more than entertain people. Let them go dig a ditch. Maybe we'll have better quality music because it will come from someone with life experience instead of someone with gold bars under their pillows.

    FUCK THE ARTISTS. STEAL EVERYTHING THEY HAVE. I'm not talking about infringement. I'm talking about going into their house and actually taking things of value. Lets show them what it means to have someone actually steal from them. Infringement won't mean so much then.

     

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  245.  
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    Jay Blanc, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 8:46am

    Okay then.

    Without copyright, ar

     

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  246.  
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    Karl (profile), Apr 9th, 2011 @ 8:49am

    Re:

    I deserve a reference if anyone uses my ideas and data

    You're out of luck, then, because copyright covers neither ideas nor empirical data.

    I certainly deserve protection if someone tries to pass my ideas and data off as their own.

    Since plagiarism is not against the law, unless it is also copyright infringement, then again you're out of luck.

    For example, I could say that e=mc2 is my own idea, and there would be absolutely nothing illegal about it. Of course, that wouldn't stop my peers and professors from booting me out of the scientific community.

     

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  247.  
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    Trails (profile), Apr 9th, 2011 @ 8:54am

    Re:

    Because it's outside of the scope of copyright.

    As well, your strawman is ridiculously oversimplified, and glosses over the issues. Typically many people pirate because they want consume something in a fashion other than it is offered.

    Consider movies. I don't want to shell out $20 bucks a ticket, find a sitter, schlepp to and from the theater, line up for an hour to get decent seats, get gouged at the concession stand, and sit in a smelly, poorly maintained theater with some idiot who brought their crying baby, while some other asshole tries to take pictures of the screen with their flash on (I've had this happen, took the theater an hour to do anything about it) in order to see a movie, when I can watch it in my home.

    Consider the success of netflix despite widespread availability of exactly the same material over bittorrent.

    The arrogance of trying to control how people consume what you sell is the fallacy. Further, with anything digital which can be downloaded, it's downright stupid.

     

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  248.  
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    Richard (profile), Apr 9th, 2011 @ 8:58am

    Re: Moral arguments

    Everything you "create" is a derivative of things other people "created" in the past. It is immoral to forbid other people from doing the same.

    St MAtthew's Gospel puts your point more succinctly:

    "Freely you have received - freely give."

     

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  249.  
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    Jay Blanc, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 9:00am

    (Comment system ate my previous comment)

    Okay then.

    Without copyright, art would be the reserve of the rich who could pay the living costs of the creators. As it was *before* we had copyright, where you either had a patron who would take direct ownership of anything you produced. Art was something you kept locked away in your private home, or held a subscription to the local opera or ballet. The masses were limited to the basic wandering minstrels who provided only the limited entertainment for what they could earn in tips.

    The roadmap you indicate leads either to artists having to give away everything for free and only having rich people be able to be artists, or rich people patronising the arts and much much more limited access to them. Want to see a multi-million dollar movie, better have your own cinema and pay a share of the production costs up-front.

    Or if you want a middle road with people able to make a living from art, and still have widespread distribution of art at affordable prices... You need copyright. And yes, sometimes artists give away stuff for free, but they don't give away the copyright on it, and they mainly do it to advertise 'premium' stuff they get money or by putting ads on it. Copyright ensures it's the *artist* who gets to chose what business plan they will follow to sell their works. Removing copyright chokes the Artist into either finding a rich patron, scraping a living off tips for performance, or giving it away for free without any other recourse. And you can forget "Advertising based Income" without copyright. What's to stop a TV channel just showing your TV program with their own adverts, and not paying a dime for it.

    Is Floor64 going to stand by the published remarks on Techdirt, and let someone start up a website, copy Techdirt's content, replace all the advertising with their own, and profit of their back?

     

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  250.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 9:11am

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    If the founding fathers believed that copy'right' is a natural right, why is their purpose of existence to promote the progress? The logical conclusion is that they believed that its purpose is to promote the progress, not to fulfill some natural right that you think you have, because they believed that you have no such natural rights.

     

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  251.  
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    Karl (profile), Apr 9th, 2011 @ 9:25am

    Re:

    I believe that everyone would be much better off without weenus protection laws.

    I know you're just joking, but actually that does open up a whole can of worms.

    What forms of violence (if any) should be allowed in society? For instance, if a white guy calls a black guy the n-word, and the black guy punches the white guy in the mouth, is that justified? Should it be legal? If not, should his assault charges be reduced?

    What are the appropriate jail times for assault charges? Should we punish certain forms of assault (e.g. hate crimes) as harshly as we punish murder?

    I'm not saying that you or I should actually answer these questions. I'm just pointing out that, even in a "simple" scenario like this, the debate is not at all clear.

    It does, however, have a simple justification. Whatever those laws are, they must be written to maximize the public good. Assuming violence should be reduced overall we need to tailor those laws towards that specific goal. This is something pretty much everyone agrees with, or else the life of man would be "nasty, brutish, and short" (to quote Hobbes... without payment, by the way).

    Bringing subjective morality into it (e.g. "weenis-punching should get the death penalty because weeners are better than beavers") only serves to derail the conversation.

    So it is with copyright law... or at least, that's what the Founding Fathers intended. Copyright exists to maximize the public good, and for no other reason. The problem is, due to propaganda and lobbying by corporate rights holders, this purpose has been all but obliterated. Nearly everyone things of copyright in terms of "artists' rights," and not in terms of "public good."

    One of the guys at the FSF (I forget who) told me a story about a meeting with one of Massachusetts' noble public servants (I believe it was Barney Frank). He asked, "How does this new law serve the public good?" Frank responded, "What does the public have to do with copyright?"

    So, the article is completely correct. Asking whether "artists deserve to get paid" is asking the wrong question. The right question is asking whether the law benefits the public.

    The moment you stop asking that question is the moment you start making terrible laws. Copyright law, at least as it stands now, is a terrible set of laws. And by leaving the public good out of the conversation altogether, the laws are only going to get worse.

     

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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 9:26am

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    (and if the founding fathers believed such a natural right exists, why did the founding fathers not require it to be granted. Instead, they only give congress permission to grant it to promote the progress, they do not require congress to grant it. Perhaps they make no such requirement because they believe that no such requirement should exist. It makes sense that they believe that no such requirement should exist because they do not believe copy'right' is a natural right.

    The context of patents and copy'right' were often discussed together and they were written together. The same general attitude about ideas that apply patents can reasonably apply to their concept of copy'right' as well. Heck, Jefferson didn't even really believe anyone had a natural right to his house or land.

    "It is agreed by those who have seriously considered the subject, that no individual has, of natural right, a separate property in an acre of land, for instance."

    How much more do you think that applies to ideas and books (read what he wrote). No one is entitled to a monopoly on anything and its everyone's natural right to copy as they please. These laws exist for one reason and one reason alone, to promote the progress, not to enforce a right that artists don't have.

    "By an universal law, indeed, whatever, whether fixed or movable, belongs to all men equally and in common"

    It's everyone's natural right to copy whatever they please as they please. The founding fathers believed this. Just like its everyone's natural right to use any piece of land that as they please, the same thing applies to ideas and expressions, even moreso. That's why the constitution allows their existence only for the purpose of promoting the progress, not for the purpose of protecting some 'right' that artists allegedly have. They believed no such right existed. Provide me quotes that suggest otherwise.

     

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  253.  
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    Kaden (profile), Apr 9th, 2011 @ 9:27am

    Speaking as a techie artist, techies expounding on art is like artists expounding on tech; the signal to noise ratio is really non optimal.

     

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  254.  
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    hxa7241, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 9:34am

    Re:

    You are confusing the morality of following a law with the morality of the law itself. You are also confusing ownership and transaction of ordinary physical property with those of abstract objects.

    The basic logical/physical fact is that abstract objects are infinitely reproducible. So a law or rule that constrains transactions to only symmetrical pay-for-copy is necessarily restricting what would otherwise be available.

    Why restrict a beneficial abundance, where there is no essential need? Any rule that does that really ought to seem immediately suspect morally. And for any 'natural rights' position it seems impossible that it can ever give a satisfactory answer.

    The response that pay-for-copy pays for production fails, because there is nothing *essential* in that arrangement. Logically, the copies depend on production, not the reverse; and it is quite possible for production to be paid for in other ways. So pay-for-copy is neither forced by necessity, nor provides something otherwise unavailable that would compensate for loss of use of copy abundance.

    The response that pay-for-copy benefits the 'owner' fails, because it is not a *universalised* justification. A moral rule is one that makes sense for all. It is justified not simply by its gain for an individual, but as something that works for everyone. Since pay-the-'owner'-for-copy restricts access to the abundance of copies, but only to the benefit of an individual, or in aggregate to no net benefit, it is not persuasive morally.

    The only reasonable argument for pay-for-copy is the orthodox economic one of supporting and sustaining a market. This is a pragmatic moral argument: one that is a matter of evidence and practicality (neither of which currently stands up well) -- so if you want to argue for copy-restriction, you need to set to work there.

     

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  255.  
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    Jay Blanc, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 9:36am

    Also, do we really have to take "No one deserves anything" flat as the God-Given-Truth... I was unaware that TechDirt was arguing solely from the Ayn Rand Objectivist position?

    I assume TechDirt also despises people who think we "deserve" things like "Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness" if "No one deserves anything". Is Masnick really pinning Techdirt's colors to the mast of Ultra Libertarianism, and denying any moral rights exist except the hallowed right of "screw you I want to do what I want to do"?

     

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  256.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 9:39am

    Re:

    I think people simply expect that if they offer something for sale, that if people want it to consume it, they have to pay for it.

    Oh goody, because I offer licenses for sale to people allowing them to breath the air on planet Earth.

    "But don't think you're entitled to the benefits of having something that you didn't pay for."

    Really? How much did you pay for the benefit of posting your comment here? Are you breathing the air? Have you bought one of my licenses?

    This is a simple and moral concept that I never see addressed here. I wonder why.

    Perhaps you have reading problems, because it's been "addressed" here many, many times. Now you know.

     

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  257.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 9:40am

    Re: Re: Re: Re:

    if you cant offer anything more than "you're wrong" and nothing to back it up.... then YOU my friend, are the one that is wrong.

    Do you have something to back that up?

     

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  258.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 9:42am

    Re: Re: Re:

    What did my parents offer for sale that I took without paying?

    Were your parents slaves or did they generally expect payment for their work?

     

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  259.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 9:44am

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    I don't what your parents were like, but those things were not offered for sale to me...

    So, you just took them anyway? THIEF!

     

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  260.  
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    Karl (profile), Apr 9th, 2011 @ 9:45am

    Re:

    Without copyright, art would be the reserve of the rich who could pay the living costs of the creators. As it was *before* we had copyright, where you either had a patron who would take direct ownership of anything you produced.

    The scenario you just described is exactly how music and movies work right now.

    Copyright has not changed this one iota.

    And yes, sometimes artists give away stuff for free, but they don't give away the copyright on it, and they mainly do it to advertise 'premium' stuff they get money or by putting ads on it.

    And sometimes they "give away the copyright" on it, and make more money than they would otherwise.

    Is Floor64 going to stand by the published remarks on Techdirt, and let someone start up a website, copy Techdirt's content, replace all the advertising with their own, and profit of their back?

    People already have, and Mike has publicly stated that he's fine with it.

     

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  261.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 9:47am

    Re:

    Rights are things that governments can't take away from us, they're not things that governments grant us. Copy'right' is something that the government grants.

     

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  262.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 9:49am

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    your parents sold you food clothes morality and ethics?

    that must have been one helluva jacked up childhood.


    He didn't say they did, and neither did he say "don't think you're entitled to the benefits of having something that you didn't pay for", and the person he was replying to did. But, perhaps your own "helluva jacked up childhood" keeps you from seeing that.

     

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  263.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 9:50am

    Re: Re:

    Then one may argue, "but slavery is in the public good. It hurts a private interest, but it's in a public good"

    But the difference between slavery abolition and copyright abolition is that slavery is something that governments generally grant and enforce, they're not something that the government takes away.

     

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  264.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 9:51am

    Re: Re: Re:

    enforces*

    Copy'right' is something that the government grants, its abolition is not, being that its abolition doesn't require a government.

     

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  265.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 9:51am

    Re: Re:

    Oh goody, because I offer licenses for sale to people allowing them to breath the air on planet Earth.

    So people should be allowed to pollute as much air as they want without paying for it?

     

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  266.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 9:56am

    Re: Re: Re:

    I see you have no answer or defense to the simple question I asked, and felt the need to change the subject.

    I see that you seem to be unable to read. The very title of the article for these comments has the word "copyright" right in it, so it seems to be you who is trying to change subjects while accusing others of the same thing. What a hypocrite, but then that's what I usually see from your type.

     

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  267.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 9:58am

    Re:

    (Ok, well that's wrong. sorry. I'm confusing rights and liberties. Rights are things that the government grants us and enforces, and liberties are things that the government can't take away from us. Free speech is a liberty, not being discriminated against based on race is a right).

    "Is Masnick really pinning Techdirt's colors to the mast of Ultra Libertarianism, and denying any moral rights exist except the hallowed right of "screw you I want to do what I want to do"?"

    No, some moral rights do exist, but copy'right' isn't one of them. In fact, it's my moral right to copy as I please, so we do believe in moral rights.

     

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  268.  
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    bigpicture, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 10:01am

    Re: Genius

    Well genius, if I only I had a copyright on air I would make you pay plenty for it, and see if you are of the same opinion about free/pay. If only I could somehow monopolize your water supply because the government granted me special privileges, I could make you thirsty. You seem to think that somehow creativity comes from individuals and not from education, culture and society in general. That in the larger picture creativity belongs to society in general, because it was society in general that took it to that point.

    What if Michael Angelo had been raised by monkeys?

    Red Hat is now only after a short time a Billion dollar company. You can download their product for free and legally off the internet. So how do they make their money, you figure that out genius.

     

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  269.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 10:02am

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    "...perhaps you should sign in so everyone can see that you are indeed who we suspect..."

    Ditto yourself.

    I'm talking about taking something without paying; whether its copyrighted or not is irrelevant to that question.

    So now you're saying that even using non-copyrighted, public-domain stuff without making a "payment" to someone is somehow wrong? Wow. Just wow. What a sense of entitlement. But typical of your type.

     

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  270.  
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    Karl (profile), Apr 9th, 2011 @ 10:02am

    Re:

    I assume TechDirt also despises people who think we "deserve" things like "Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness" if "No one deserves anything".

    The Techdirt position seems pretty clear: "things" should be granted, by law, only if they maximize the public good. Asking whether we "deserve" those things is asking the wrong question.

    Funny you should mention "Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness." Here's what the author of those words said about "intellectual property:"
    Inventions then cannot, in nature, be a subject of property. Society may give an exclusive right to the profits arising from them, as an encouragement to men to pursue ideas which may produce utility, but this may or may not be done, according to the will and convenience of the society, without claim or complaint from anybody.

    - Thomas Jefferson to Isaac McPherson

     

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  271.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 10:07am

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    While I think that your stance is immoral, at least you are man enough to say exactly what your beliefs are.

    I seem to remember a story about a man who replicated some food for a gathering of people. I think his name was Jesus. You think Jesus was immoral? Yeah, well, your type would.

    Copyright is evil.
    Abolish copyright.

     

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  272.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 10:09am

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    "The whole idea was to get people to verbalize the depth of their moral depravity, and everybody came through with flying colors."

    But none could match yours, could they?

     

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  273.  
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    bigpicture, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 10:12am

    Re: Re: Lame

    What a Lame Brained argument. Did you build and pay for the factory that built the car? Who owns the device that creates the copy? What did the copy cost, and to whom did it cost? You are making the HUGE presumption that one copy made equates to one lost sale. What Business School did you go to?

    Do you understand markets and the concept of what makes for plentiful supply (easy copying) versus low market demand. (crappy products) Someone invented coping devices for sale to the public, and it was not musicians, authors, record labels etc. but musicians, authors, record labels want to control them, in fact they wanted to stop Sony from making cassette players. BOO HOO it will disrupt our business model. Well there are no more horse carriage manufacturers because someone disrupted that business model, and so we move on.
    Let's see where the price of cars go when they invent replicators.

     

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  274.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 10:12am

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    The sale of the copy comes with limited ownership rights...

    Only legally (which isn't being questioned), not morally. Legal doesn't mean moral.

     

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  275.  
    identicon
    Anonymous Coward, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 10:14am

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    You've broken the conditions required to acquire the item in question.

    Legally, not morally.

     

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  276.  
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    JayBlanc, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 10:14am

    Re: Re:

    "The scenario you just described is exactly how music and movies work right now."

    Seriously? Check history. If you think we're restricted in what can be published in mass media now, check out the times when the Church could dictate what would or would not be allowed to be printed. And the primary reason they got away with it was because they held the biggest purse strings, and could dictate who and who could not receive patronsism.

    Copyright freed artists and writers from being under the thumb of powerful vested interests. While they still have sway, they have far less of it than they used to! And that's an argument for Monopoly concerns, to prevent anyone like Murdoch gaining too much influence over any particular sphere of publishing and broadcasting. It is not an argument to abolish copyright.

    So far, there hasn't been an argument provided that abolishing Copyright will be for the public good. Reducing copyright terms may well be for the public good, but I've not seen a serious argument presented for why abolishing it wouldn't push us back into stifled creativity of powerful patrons and rich galavants being the only cultural forces.

    "People already have, and Mike has publicly stated that he's fine with it."

    Mike also seems to have a sloppy understanding of copyright law there. He could well release every article he publishes on TechDirt into the public domain, simply by making an assertive statement forfeiting copyrights on the article. That he doesn't means he retains copyright. I ask him to stand by his words, and start putting an assertive statement forfeiting copyright to his articles.

    Then I may well start copying his works. Perhaps adding value by annotating them to point out where he misunderstands copyright law, makes contradictory statements, veers off into crazy libertarian land, and insults his readership by telling them what they are and are not allowed to argue.

     

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  277.  
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    wvhillbilly (profile), Apr 9th, 2011 @ 10:15am

    Copyright trolls

    I am in full agreement with your assessment of the modern attitude toward copyright by some copyright owners, but I would have liked it better if you had left out the profanity and vulgar language. A simple [...] in place of the vulgarity would have sufficed. It adds nothing to the article, and if anything degrades it.

    That said, I think greed and arrogance have overtaken many so-called artists who are copyright owners, and especially corporate entities like record companies and the RIAA who I believe have found litigation to be a handy way to bring in even more money. To me, it is legalized extortion. It costs the record companies relatively little money to join a thousand or more unnamed defendants in a single lawsuit, find their identities in ex-parte actions, then ambush them with threatening letters stating they will be liable for hundreds of thousands of dollars in damages, but offer to settle for a few thousand if they will act quickly.

    The vast majority of those targeted by these lawsuits are individuals who have shared a few songs with others, and I seriously doubt the record companies have suffered any actual damage from their actions. In many cases this gives them additional exposure, and people if they like a shared song will go out and buy a copy of that CD for themselves, thus actually boosting sales. Others who download "pirated" music probably wouldn't have bought the CD regardless of whether the song they wanted was available through other channels or not, so again the record companies have suffered no real, actual damage.

    Another problem is the record companies have used shady investigative techniques in their quest to identify infringers, and in many cases have identified totally innocent people, even infants, small children, elderly grandmothers, people who have never had computers, and even the dead, as offenders. And those who have opted to fight this unjust litigation have found themselves faced with totally outrageous judgments, out of all proportion with any actual damages. Case in point-Jammie Thomas-Rasset. Found to have infringed songs with an actual value of probably less than $50.00, she has been hit with a judgment well in excess of $1 million. In this case it is obvious the intent of the record companies and RIAA is to send a message to anyone they catch in their dragnet, Pay up now or we will destroy you.

    What's wrong with this approach? For starters, while this may bring in some extra money in the short term, it is doing them serious damage to their good will long term, and ultimately will anger many who read of these atrocities and turn them away from the big labels responsible for them. And this is beside the point that most of their music (in my estimation anyway) is just pure garbage. Suing your potential customers is no way to bring in repeat business. (And then the music industry wonders why their sales are tanking.)

    Secondly, there are other, much more amicable ways this situation could be dealt with. I have no doubt that most of those sharing files would gladly pay a small monthly fee for a license to share files legally, and if enough would participate the record companies could probably bring in much more even than they get with their senseless litigation, and without making enemies of their customers.

    Commercial pirates are another matter altogether. These are people who mass produce and sell for money counterfeit CDs and DVDs without a license from the copyright holders. The record companies have every right to go after these mass infringers, as they do real damage to them, not only by taking away money that should rightly go to them, but in reputation as in many cases the counterfeit copies are of poor quality which those buying them may equate with the actual source.

    But to sue individuals who upload or download a few songs for their own enjoyment, or for others to hear, for 10s of thousands of times any alleged actual damages? Give me a break!

     

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  278.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 10:15am

    Re: Re: Genius

    Red Hat makes a lot of that money because companies are insecure. People will claim it's for "support" but really it's more like the illusion of support. Have you ever called tech support for an issue? How much would you realistically pay for that level of "support?" Companies will pay a lot more so their IT departments can have someone else to blame if things go wrong, because it is in their interest to hide the truth.

    Many companies are realizing this and switching to CentOS instead, which is the free version of RHEL. RHEL is already purposefully behind the curve and CentOS is now lagging the latest RHEL release by five months. So can you really get RHEL for free? No, you can't. They use trademark law to make it painful for people to get their actual, real product for free.

     

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  279.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 10:19am

    Re: Re: Re:

    They are harassing people that break the license ...

    Heh, you couldn't make the moral argument stick, so now you're falling back on the legal argument. Legal doesn't mean moral.

     

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  280.  
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    Cipher-0, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 10:19am

    Re:

    I think it's more that copyright is less about the artists and a lot more about the public good.

    My understanding of copyright was to allow producers of content enough time to make money from their productions before it became a public good.

    As originally envisioned, copyright offered a limited window of exclusivity (if I remember 14 years with an option for another 14 years) before things slipped into the public domain.

    This "limited" part has gone away. I don't even see copyright maximalists trying to defend that life plus 70 years is in any way shape or form limited.

    Thanks to copyright extension content - even content that the rights holder is not actively making available - is locked up by this over-long copyright to the detriment of the public good.

    I can think of a few books I'd lost or have been destroyed that are no longer in print and because of the copyright it's both a criminal and civil offense for anyone to copy and make this available, despite the rights holder clearly not caring that they make no money currently from the work.

    How is this for the public good?

     

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  281.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 10:21am

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    I have the right to come over every morning and repeatedly kick you in the balls.

    See? I knew you were from the copyright industry.

     

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  282.  
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    Greevar (profile), Apr 9th, 2011 @ 10:29am

    Re: Re: Re: Lame

    Or invent matter teleportation. Oh no! Cars are now irrelevant!

     

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  283.  
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    Karl (profile), Apr 9th, 2011 @ 10:30am

    Re: Re: Re:

    Then one may argue, "but slavery is in the public good. It hurts a private interest, but it's in a public good"

    Except that slavery is not in the public good. It benefits nobody except the slaveholders.

    If slavery truly were in the best interests of the public, it would probably still be around. Whether moral or not.

     

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  284.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 10:30am

    Re: Re: Re:

    Quality content costs time and money to create.

    Copyright applies automatically. There is no "time and money" test applied to qualify for copyright. Furthermore, I've seen plenty of "quality" content produced for little time and money, and plenty of crap produced with lots of time and money. So your time and money = quality thesis is just another example of more copyright bunk.

     

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  285.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 10:32am

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    I set that shizz up on a tee, and you freetards hit it out of the park.

    In case you hadn't noticed, the shizz getting hit out of the park are your balls.

     

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  286.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 10:34am

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    So you don't think that books will continue to be written without copy'right'? I find that absurd.

    Well, they never were written before copyright, were they?

    /s

     

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  287.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 10:35am

    Re: Copyright trolls

    Just remember that for all of the complaining about the huge dragnet that copyright infringement cases were and how many innocent people were snared, the three famous cases that were widely covered on the Internet: Thomas(-Rasset), Tenenbaum, and Lindor involved people lying or conveniently misremembering facts. These are the best defendants that could be mustered?

     

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  288.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 10:37am

    Re: Re: Re:

    If I signed a contract with the renter that said I would pay them for every performance, I would have to pay him a cut.

    That's a legal, not moral, basis. Legal does not mean moral.

     

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  289.  
    identicon
    Anonymous Coward, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 10:38am

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    As the anonymous poster stated: It depends on the terms.

    Legally, not morally.

     

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  290.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 10:39am

    Re: Re: Re: Re:

    If slavery truly were in the best interests of the public, it would probably still be around. Whether moral or not.

    So since copyright is still around, it must also be in the public good. Otherwise it would have been disposed of already, right?

     

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  291.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 10:39am

    Re: Re: Re:

    I believe you waived that right when you posted here, but check his TOS if you're not sure.

    There he goes again, making crap up.

     

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  292.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 10:43am

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    Then you just sent your comment into public domain, didn't you?

    Heh, you wish, you dirty, rotten copyright violator! Copyright is automatic.

    Oh, wait, you've been defending copyright. I guess you're a hypocrite too! (of course)

     

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  293.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 10:46am

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    I'll tell you what, if you can show that your post makes any sense legally, I'll happily mail you 5 bucks.

    No need to mail it. Just post your address and he can come pick it up in person.

     

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  294.  
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    Chris in Utah (profile), Apr 9th, 2011 @ 10:48am

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    or selling manhatten for 24 dollars in artwork

     

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  295.  
    identicon
    Anonymous Coward, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 10:49am

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    Like I say, if you can provide a moral dilemma for me that doesn't involve tricking me, and I fail it, then I've lost the moral high ground.

    You never had any moral high ground to loose.

    Copyright is trickery.
    Abolish copyright.

     

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  296.  
    identicon
    Anonymous Coward, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 10:51am

    Re: Re: Nested Commets

    Trickling words devolve
    Haiku of nested comments
    Hardly poetic

     

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  297.  
    identicon
    Anonymous Coward, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 10:56am

    Re: Re: Re: Re:

    Yes I'm using TOR.
    Signing in is not going to happen sorry.


    But what if you write something I don't like and I want to punish you for it? How's that going to happen if you're using TOR?

     

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  298.  
    identicon
    Richard Wayne Smith, SSN 451-95-2831, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 11:04am

    Re: Re: Re:

    Could you please sign up for a real account and log in?

    Could you please sign up for a real account (under your real full legal name and national ID) and log in? Thanks.

     

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  299.  
    identicon
    Max Keele, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 11:16am

    Whoa

    Julian Sanchez just delivered the single most cogent expiation of the moral imperative for copyright law I've ever seen. I vote we put him in charge of the FCC.

     

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  300.  
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    The eejit (profile), Apr 9th, 2011 @ 11:21am

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    You did have a childhood, right? That's something you get for 'nothing'. The average cost of a child is $144k/annum, if all the things you get as a child that you don't pay for.

     

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  301.  
    identicon
    Anonymous Coward, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 11:22am

    Re:

    "So I'm on my way to remove the Techdirt gadget from homepage now. Had enough of the fucking rivers you guys keep crying."

    Don't let the door hit you in the ass on your way out.

     

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  302.  
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    Greevar (profile), Apr 9th, 2011 @ 11:23am

    Reply to AC's OP.

    "I think people simply expect that if they offer something for sale, that if people want it to consume it, they have to pay for it.

    If they don't want to consume it, walk away and don't pay anything.

    But don't think you're entitled to the benefits of having something that you didn't pay for.

    This is a simple and moral concept that I never see addressed here. I wonder why."


    Your argument is missing a few key items and making false assumptions. Firstly, what are you selling? Are you selling physical property or the services of an author/artist? If it is your exclusive physical property, then no individual has the right to take it. If you're talking about a service, there is nobody that can take it from you against your will.

    There is no law or statue that gives you the right to demand payment for anything you demand payment for. For example, you cannot demand payment for property you do not own. Thus is the situation with creative works. You don't own them exclusively, because they belong to everyone. Copyright assigns the right of control of the work to you for a limited amount of time. This the biggest false assumption every supporter of copyright makes. They think that copyright gives them title of property over the works they create when, in fact, it does not. The copyright belongs to you, but not the work it applies to. The works belong to everyone. Why else would the copyright be temporary? Copyright is the exception to the public domain. The public domain is the rule.

    If was truly your property, should it not be your property forever? It isn't forever, because it's not your property. It is a temporary monopoly to restrict the use and distribution of a work to create an opportunity to earn a profit from the work. Copyright does not grant the holder the right to be paid, only the opportunity to sell it while others are excluded from doing the same. If the copyright term expires and you made no money from your work, the terms of the copyright are still satisfied, because it is not a right to payment.

    You may not have mentioned copyright specifically, but that was an attempt on your part to obfuscate the argument in your favor by passing off false colloquial concepts that do not exist in our codified laws because they set up a standard that would be damaging to the rights of all people. And specifically, it would damage our ability to create and assimilate new cultural symbols.

    This "moral" concept you posit is not discussed here because it is false, illogical, and doesn't hold muster against our existing laws. The reason you discuss it is because you don't understand what you are talking about.

     

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  303.  
    identicon
    Anonymous Coward, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 11:25am

    Re:

    Without copyright, art would be the reserve of the rich who could pay the living costs of the creators. As it was *before* we had copyright,...

    So now the IP-tards are resorting to blatant lies (again).

     

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  304.  
    icon
    Chris in Utah (profile), Apr 9th, 2011 @ 11:26am

    Re: Re:

    Your explanation of 3 is counter to 1. Does the rational person throw me into a wall for calling him an ass?

     

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  305.  
    identicon
    Nicedoggy, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 11:27am

    Re: Re: Copyright trolls

    Also remember that they shared not thousands of files, with millions of people, they shared a couple dozen songs each, and were afraid for their lifes, with good reason as it turns out.

    You also must remember that industry figures are no different.

    Korea’s Fair Trade Commission fines 15 music distributors for collectively rigging prices
    by VITALSIGN on March 1, 2011 at 1:20 am
    http://www.allkpop.com/2011/03/koreas-fair-trade-commission-fines-15-music-distributors-for-coll ectively-rigging-prices

    • Westchester Premier Theater Affair (1982):
    • Solomon Weiss (Convicted of racketeering, fraud and perjury charges and acquitted of tax violations, five years community service and a fine of $58,000)
    • Jay Emmett (pleaded guilty in exchange for his cooperation, received a suspended sentence)
    November 28, 1982, Sunday

    An executive of Warner Communications was convicted yesterday of fraudulently arranging the company's purchase of stock in the Westchester Premier Theater. The jury found the executive, Solomon Weiss, guilty of racketeering, fraud and perjury charges and acquitted him of tax violations. The verdict came on the fourth day of deliberations after a three-week trial in Federal District Court in Manhattan. Mr. Weiss, the 53-year-old assistant treasurer of the giant entertainment company, appeared pale and shaken after the verdict. He could face up to 20 years in prison on the main charge and could be required to forfeit his $2 million of Warner stock to the Government.

    • Source:
    http://www.nytimes.com/1982/11/28/nyregion/warner-executive-convicted-of-fraud-in-purchase-of-theate r-stock.html
    http://bulk.resource.org/courts.gov/c/F2/752/752.F2d.777.84-1103.1481.html
    • 752 F.2d 777; UNITED STATES of America, Appellee, v. Solomon WEISS, Defendant-Appellant.; No. 1481, Docket 84-1103.; United States Court of Appeals, Second Circuit.; Submitted July 17, 1984.; Decided Jan. 7, 1985.

    • Edgar Bronfman Jr., Warner Music CEO (5 million euros fines, 15 month prison suspended sentence)
    • Jean-Marie Messier, former head of Vivendi (150 thousand euro fines, 3 years prison suspended sentence)
    • Eric Licoys
    • Guillaume Hannezo

    • Source:
    http://www.theepochtimes.com/n2/content/view/49808/
    http://www.billboard.biz/bbbiz/industry/legal-and-management/edgar-bronfman-jr-warner-music-group-ce o-1004139847.story

    • Vivendi and Warner Guilty of Price Fixing (2003-08-12)
    ∘ By Jon Newton, p2pnet.net (2003-08-12)
    http://www.musicdish.com/mag/index.php3?id=8580

    So if they are immoral, what makes and entire industry with connections with the real mob and numerous cases of repugnant behavior like death by drugs, improper public behavior like Geroge Michael beying arrested for performing a public fellatio, or Paris Hilton listed ironically as a musician and jailed for possession of drugs which she lied about it, or every other musician that use drugs but lie about it?

    http://rateyourmusic.com/list/Shadowcast/jailed_musicians/

    Musicians that are also liars, thief and murders:

    La Bella Mafia Lil' Kim

    September 2005 - July 2006. Served ten months of a year-and-a-day sentence after being convicted of three counts of conspiracy and one count of perjury in relation to her testimony about a shooting that occurred outside of a Manhattan studio in 2001.

    Phil Spector

    May 2009 to present. Sentenced to 19 years to life following his conviction of second-degree murder. He was convicted of killing actress Lana Clarkson via gunshot at his home in 2003.

    Varg Vikernes

    June 1994 to May 2009. Formerly of the one-man band Burzum, he joined Mayhem in 1993 as a bassist and murdered his bandmate, guitarist Řystein "Euronymous" Aarseth, stabbing him 23 times. He was also convicted of the arson of four churches, and sentenced to 21 years in prison (the maximum possible sentence under Norwegian law). He was released on parole in May 2009.

    Are you really going to play that card?

     

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  306.  
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    Karl (profile), Apr 9th, 2011 @ 11:28am

    Re: Re: Re:

    Seriously? Check history.

    Oh, I know my history, at least of music and publishing. Nobody here is arguing that we should return to the laws of the Stationer's Company.

    Those (myself included) who are copyright reformers argue that copyright should serve the public benefit. Those who are abolitionists say that there is not any type of copyright law that would benefit the public more than harm it.

    The problem, from your point of view at least, is that those monopolies and censorship periods were only possible because of laws enforced by the government. Getting rid of those laws won't bring back the Stationers; and it won't bring back the Church's censorship powers. It will remove all censorship powers from anyone.

    The only thing it might do is "push us back into stifled creativity of powerful patrons and rich galavants being the only cultural forces." But we're there already. Really, think about this statement: "they held the biggest purse strings, and could dictate who and who could not receive patronsism." How does that not apply to major labels? How does that not apply to Hollywood?

    And, frankly, there's not a lot of evidence that abolishing copyright would do that. The corporations that "dictate who and who could not receive patronsism" only exist in the first place because of copyright. Getting rid of copyright would probably level the playing field, because these cabals could not exist.

    Mike also seems to have a sloppy understanding of copyright law there. He could well release every article he publishes on TechDirt into the public domain, simply by making an assertive statement forfeiting copyrights on the article.

    In fact, that is legally false. Did you read the linked article (not the Techdirt article, the one from Stephen Kinsella)? It goes into great (and colorful) detail about how it is pretty much impossible. Here it is, read it yourself:
    http://blog.mises.org/9240/copyright-is-very-sticky/

    One detail he doesn't mention: Europe's copyright laws (unlike America's or England's) include what are called "moral rights," similar to "inalienable rights" on this side of the pond. This includes the rights of attribution and integrity. These rights cannot be waived, even if the author wishes to do so. That is why a CC0 license cannot be enforced there.

    Then I may well start copying his works.

    Then do it. As Mike stated in the article I linked, he will not go after you.

    Perhaps adding value by annotating them to point out where he misunderstands copyright law, makes contradictory statements, veers off into crazy libertarian land, and insults his readership by telling them what they are and are not allowed to argue.

    Mike has a better understanding of copyright law than you do, it seems - probably because he counts several copyright lawyers among his friends. If his statements seem contradictory, then you probably don't understand them. He is a capitalist, not necessarily a libertarian. And he has never, once, told his readership what they are and are not "allowed" to argue, just which arguments make sense in his opinion.

    Still, if you want to add this "value," please do so. I'd be interested to see what you come up with.

     

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  307.  
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    Chris in Utah (profile), Apr 9th, 2011 @ 11:28am

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    This a classic men (emphasis on plural) pissing in the wind argument, cudos.

     

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  308.  
    identicon
    Anonymous Coward, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 11:28am

    Re:

    I assume TechDirt also despises people who think we "deserve" things like "Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness"

    Your faulty assumptions are your own problem.

    if "No one deserves anything"

    But that doesn't excuse your blatant misquotes.

     

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  309.  
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    The eejit (profile), Apr 9th, 2011 @ 11:32am

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    I appreciate that, and your logic here. The issue is that, as written, the laws do not promote the Arts or Progress. A considerable number of people want to change copyright laws. I'm working on my representative as we speak.

     

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  310.  
    identicon
    bigpicture, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 11:34am

    Re: Re: Re: Genius

    I think you are missing the point here, the discussion is about copyright and free downloading. Irrespective of what you think about the particular company, the point being made is that copyright is not required to maintain a viable business.

    Hey I work for the largest company in the world, and they have an IT department too, a Microsoft house if you will. And you really don't want to know what I and all those that work with me think about that. It seems that they have outsourced to Disney Land when they should have outsourced to Google. A corporate service level should not "Waaaay" be lower than what I get at home for free.

    Maybe you should read the book "Idea Man" by Paul Allen and his experiences with Bill Gates the shark champion of monopolies, patents and copyright. I have a copy of Bill's original letter to the hobbyists if you want to see it.

    But again the point, "copyright is not required to run a viable business" there are many others whose product can be downloaded by the user for free. Canonical, Google, Yahoo etc. etc. come to mind, but I suppose you will have some problem with them too.

     

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  311.  
    identicon
    Anonymous Coward, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 11:34am

    Re: Re: Re:

    "Copyright freed artists and writers from being under the thumb of powerful vested interests."

    How?

    "While they still have sway, they have far less of it than they used to!"

    But copy'right' is not to be credited for that, taking away power from the monarch is.

    "And that's an argument for Monopoly concerns, to prevent anyone like Murdoch gaining too much influence over any particular sphere of publishing and broadcasting."

    Allowing Murdoch (and others) to copy doesn't prevent him from gaining too much influence over any particular sphere of publishing and broadcasting. Prohibiting broadcasting monopolies does. Copy'right' exists and, outside the Internet, corporations already have too much control over these particular spheres of publishing and broadcasting. Copy'right' has done nothing to stop it, if anything, it contributed to it.

    "So far, there hasn't been an argument provided that abolishing Copyright will be for the public good."

    I provided arguments and you ignore them. I value the lack of copy'right' more than I value its existence because I value what I get from its lack (my right to copy) than what I get from its existence. So its lack is better for me than its existence. If the public agrees, then it is in the public good as well. I'm arguing that others should agree with me on this and I'm providing various reasons. That you choose to ignore them isn't my problem.

     

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  312.  
    icon
    Jay (profile), Apr 9th, 2011 @ 11:36am

    Re:

    That is grossly inaccurate to put it that Mike is wanting those types of terms.

    Objectivism says in a nutshell, "Greed is good." You sacrifice any altruism, (or ya know, morals), in the pursuit of profit. If Mike were actually practicing Objectivism, he would have been an IP maximalist.

    So for you to go on about moral rights means you obviously have no idea what in the world you're talking about.

    As said before, morality has absolutely nothing to do with a purchase of goods. If an artist has a song enjoyed on the radio, they can have customers look for the CD.

    If I go to a book store and enjoy its free internet, that is not a crime against any artist. Neither is going to the library and reading a book.

    The only thing that a person can do is make available a good. They can set a price and see what happens with the feedback. It's not a moral imperative for X amount of people to buy. But people will look and see and possibly find other goods that aren't readily available.

    All of this has nothing to do with the buzzwords of Libertarianism, Objectivism, and moral rights that you seem to want to use to paint the conversation.

     

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  313.  
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    The eejit (profile), Apr 9th, 2011 @ 11:36am

    Re: Re: But I only have..

    YOINK!

     

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  314.  
    icon
    Greevar (profile), Apr 9th, 2011 @ 11:36am

    Re:

    You're trying to make the argument that taking something without the owner receiving just compensation or giving permission is theft, which is true. You are also making the assumption that cultural symbols can be exclusively owned and, therefore, one can apply the previous argument to it. That is simply not true. You can own the physical medium to which the symbol is fixed, but not the symbol itself. Therefore, taking a copy of a cultural symbol (without its physical medium, like a statue or canvas) is not theft and the creator of that symbol is not entitled to payment simply by merit of that copy passing from one person to the next. The copyright is violated and the rights holder can demand arbitration that may result in damages paid, but there is no mandate for payment implied.

     

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  315.  
    icon
    Chris in Utah (profile), Apr 9th, 2011 @ 11:37am

    Age of reason

    People often write me and ask how I keep my wood floors so clean when I live with a child and a dog, and my answer is that I use a technique called Suffering From a Mental Illness.
    - Heather Armstrong Salt Lake City Blogger

    Now I don't have many issues in life and when new people enter my circle its with no trepidation of fear. I actively seek new experiences and meeting people is probably the most interesting one of them all. Then people constantly remind me of all the time I spend on the computer or more perceptive the internet. Some- times you have to spell it out for them.
    Now my firmly held creed is that you can NOT deal with an issue unless your made aware of it. That being said our choices are the issue. The choices that you believe are right and yet your willing to damage a relationship for that belief. This is what we call the axiom of ignorance. Historical perspective its the same as looking at land owning slave owners wishing to be free or aka our founding fathers. If you don't prefer axiom of ignorance you can basically boil it down to looking in a mirror and not knowing a dam thing about yourself. The Vikings may have termed it Loki's Mirror because when you really do the introspection(study of self) & actually look in there your bound to find chaos.
    Another creed of mine is one a bit more settle but very pertinent to this. Ya get my point? It covers everything; I don't even have to make a list because your doing it to every choice that we've made in our home that differs from your own and then creating this axiom(direct definition: a saying that is widely accepted on its own merits). Dogma is another word for it.
    The creed, if missed, in one word is acceptance... I regret to inform you that this is not a black and white world and if you choose to live in it and then with hindsight take issue with it, ok. Yet, what is not acceptable is making that choice over and over then taking issue with it. The settle difference its your beliefs that raise the issue rather than ideas. Ideas can change given new input, beliefs are much trickier, people die over them.
    So next time you decide to bring an issue up that you have with our choices; look in the mirror and ask yourself is it a good idea or a belief. Then MOST IMPORTANTLY; ask your self is it worth it?

    Cordially welcoming you to the age of reason,
    Chris

     

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  316.  
    identicon
    Anonymous Coward, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 11:38am

    Re: Re: Re: Re:

    If slavery truly were in the best interests of the public, it would probably still be around. Whether moral or not.

    That all depends on how you define "public good". The elimination of slavery definitely hurt the Southern US economy. Still, it was a "public good" to get rid of it.

     

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  317.  
    icon
    Jay (profile), Apr 9th, 2011 @ 11:39am

    Re: Re: Copyright trolls

    They weren't the best defendants. They were the ones with the poorest case. Yes they did it (Tenenbaum), but was it worth all of the statutory damages to show the weakness of the judicial system to destroy their economic progress for what amounts to jaywalking?

     

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  318.  
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    Greevar (profile), Apr 9th, 2011 @ 11:41am

    Re: Re:

    It's wrong to kill people, so let's kill people who kill? What a stupid argument! I, for one, think that killing for any reason other than to prevent the unlawful death of another, is completely wrong. If you are faced with a situation where you have to choose between the killer and the victim's life (either you or another innocent(s)), then you are justified in killing the killer.

     

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  319.  
    icon
    Jay (profile), Apr 9th, 2011 @ 11:44am

    Re: Re: Re: Lame

    Uhm... Based on Doggy's other comments, I think he was mocking the original author...

     

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  320.  
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    The eejit (profile), Apr 9th, 2011 @ 11:45am

    Re: Re: Copyright trolls

    No, those were the ones that the RIAA thought they could win.

     

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  321.  
    identicon
    Anonymous Coward, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 11:50am

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    You seem to have reading comprehension fail.

    The OP's "don't think you're entitled to the benefits of having something that you didn't pay for" quite clearly is in reference to what he wrote in the previous sentences about taking something for sale without paying.

     

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  322.  
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    Nicedoggy, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 11:51am

    Re: Re: Re: Genius

    Don't be stupid the GPL grants you the right to get RHEL for free if somebody gives it to you, so it is free so free that CentOS can be done and nobody complains about it, but if it was you, you would be like "OMG those thieves, they are robbing me" on the other hand the open source community look at it and say "Cool!".

    About support, yah, yah, yah is all about fear right?
    Not because people need something they can use and don't have the money to expend on other solutions and the proof that it makes money despite being free is that RHEL is almost a billion dollar company already.

    Also there Oracle Linux(from Oracle LoL WTF), Scientific Linux(from Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory), Yellow Dog Linux, ClearOS and others is that free or what?

    I just believe you are an idiot.

     

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  323.  
    identicon
    Anonymous Coward, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 11:58am

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    You seem to have reading comprehension fail.

    The OP's "don't think you're entitled to the benefits of having something that you didn't pay for" quite clearly is in reference to what he wrote in the previous sentences about taking something for sale without paying.


    Sorry, no one said otherwise, so the failure seems to be yours. Keep trying.

     

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  324.  
    identicon
    Nicedoggy, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 12:01pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    If he points to your answer before would you be satisfied?

     

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  325.  
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    Greevar (profile), Apr 9th, 2011 @ 12:02pm

    Re:

    "Seriously Mike, you need to grow the fuck up, and realize you and the rest of the world can't freeload everything."

    This is where your misconceptions fully expose themselves. You make the grand assumption that the point of all of this is to get everything for free and make it impossible for creative people to make a living. That is completely, without question, false. This is about changing the standard to allow the maximum proliferation of the arts and sciences for the benefit of all society while still allowing avenues for people to make a living on art.

    This blog shows, day after day, very talented people making a very respectable living from alternative models that function without any dependency on the concept of copyright nor "IP". Your kind frequently disregard these instances as anecdotal evidence, but you fail to see the bigger picture. All of those "exceptions" come together to from a body of data that shows that copyright is completely unnecessary for these to work and they even thrive without its use. What is exceptional is the "stars" that make it big from signing with powerful and rich record labels that make the artist rich. This is a truly rare occurrence because making it big with a major label is like winning the lottery whereas there are equally talented, or even more so talented, artists making a respectable living without the help of major labels because their work is worth paying for in the eyes of their fans.

    I suggest that you grow the fuck up and stop living in a fantasy world where it's illegal to do things differently than you wish them to be done despite the facts.

     

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  326.  
    identicon
    Anonymous Coward, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 12:04pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    oh look, we're back to Karl reading into the law what he wants to see.

    copyright does promote progress by protecting artists.

    see what I did there? That was easy.

     

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  327.  
    identicon
    Anonymous Coward, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 12:06pm

    Held for Review

    Mike,
    Could you please hold all messages originating from the IP address of commenter #1 for a couple of days for "review by staff" before they are posted? I know you've previously said that such holds don't amount to censorship, so that shouldn't be a problem.

    I would be glad to help yo identify other addresses that need to have holds placed on them as well.

     

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  328.  
    identicon
    JayBlanc, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 12:08pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re:

    What exactly do you think you will have to copy if there is no financial incentive to publish.

     

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  329.  
    identicon
    Anonymous Coward, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 12:08pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Genius

    You cannot take an unlicensed copy of RHEL from a friend and install it. Trademark law prevents you from doing so. The GPL gives you no rights here. Stop lying.

     

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  330.  
    identicon
    Anonymous Coward, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 12:11pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    "copyright does promote progress by protecting artists."

    It's not meant to promote the progress of the protection of artists, it's meant to promote the progress of the sciences and the arts. You're confusing the sciences and the arts with the scientists and the artists.

     

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  331.  
    identicon
    Anonymous Coward, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 12:12pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    You're assuming that (financial) incentives exist outside of copy'right' but such an assumption is absurd.

     

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  332.  
    identicon
    Anonymous Coward, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 12:13pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    (and if that's not what you're assuming, then your question is irrelevant. Why even ask it?).

     

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  333.  
    identicon
    Anonymous Coward, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 12:17pm

    Re: Re:

    If you put your couch up for sale, and I want to buy it, AND we agree on the value of it, you get paid I get the couch.

    But if I put my couch up for sale, and you want to buy it, BUT you don't agree on the value, I don't get paid and you still get the couch?

    Bzzt.

    That's not how it works and you know it.

    The only difference is you can take the "couch" (media) without paying and without fear of being charged by law enforcement.

    Problem needs a solution.

    Law enforcement must be able to somehow protect the "couch" owner.

    And that is indeed what law enforcement is finally doing.

    Which makes Mike Masnick and the rest of the freetards here very angry.

     

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    Nicedoggy, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 12:18pm

    Re: Re: Re:

    Can you understand why the church was able to do what they did?

    They had the monopoly, nobody could do squat without paying them up and that is one of the reasons in many of the revolts of the commons why religious figures where slaughtered, the modern day equivalent are artists trying to impose absurd norms to people for which in the end they will get "slaughtered" too, that is why copyrights will grow and be repealed to rise again and restart the cycle.

    The difference is that today people don't need to kill artists to accomplish that task they can and will migrate to free legal alternatives.

    This is why people don't respect copyright because is the same thing the church was doing in medieval times.

    About Mikes copyright instances oh well he made a public statement already saying that there is no permissions needed to copy or reuse his work on this blog and that is valid in any court of law as a contract.

    Although it would be practical to have some place with this written for easy access and linking he already gave those rights up and did not apparently revoked that statement.

    Can you please show us how the church is different from artists today?

    Both claim control over something, both keeps creating absurd rules and now copyrights is feeling the wrath of society just like in medieval times when people got fed up with the monks.

     

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    bigpicture, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 12:20pm

    Re: Re: Re:

    You seem to put a lot of faith in "the Law". While "the Law" only represents the interests of those with the most power and influence. It does not have to represent the interests of the majority or even make sense for that matter. Here is a few from the Law Books and in this day and age copyright law fits right in here:

    It is considered an offense to open an umbrella on a street, for fear of spooking horses.
    It is illegal to wear a fake moustache that causes laughter in church.
    Putting salt on a railroad track may be punishable by death.
    Women are able to retain all property they owned prior to marriage in the case of divorce. However, this provision does not apply to men.
    It is illegal for a driver to be blindfolded while operating a vehicle.

     

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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 12:20pm

    Re: Re: Re:

    "But if I put my couch up for sale, and you want to buy it, BUT you don't agree on the value, I don't get paid and you still get the couch?"

    The day that I can freely make copies of your couch is the day that your argument makes sense. The difference in this analogy is that, just because I get the couch doesn't mean you lose the couch. You still have it. I just made a copy. Sure, I get the value of the couch, but you get the value of the air you breath and you're not paying me for it. So what?

    "The only difference is you can take the "couch" (media) without paying and without fear of being charged by law enforcement."

    No one is taking the couch, we're just making copies.

     

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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 12:22pm

    Re:

    And my master plan just keeps steamin' right along...

     

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  338.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 12:23pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re:

    "That's not how it works and you know it."

    Only because taking the couch deprives you of it. But making a copy of it does not.

     

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    Greevar (profile), Apr 9th, 2011 @ 12:26pm

    Re: Re: Re:

    Labels and publishers prove that the patron system of funding artists is still fully in existence. Furthermore, back in the period you refer to, there was no such thing as digital distribution that exists today. Today, there is far more power on the artists' side to succeed without copyright than there is with it or without it back then.

     

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  340.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 12:26pm

    Re: Re:

    If you have the right to that license, I'll be happy to pay.

    I can prove that I have the right to my license, the one for music.

    Can you prove that you have the right to your license for the sun?

    Try again.

     

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  341.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 12:29pm

    Re: Re: Re:

    "But if I put my couch up for sale, and you want to buy it, BUT you don't agree on the value, I don't get paid and you still get the couch?"

    I'm selling you the air that you're breathing. You don't agree on the price, you want to pay nothing, but I'm still not getting paid and you're still getting the air that you're breathing. Now pay me.

    Just because someone isn't getting paid for something doesn't mean that they can morally deprive someone else of it. You have no moral basis of depriving me of a copy of that couch. So what if you don't get paid, I'm not getting paid for the air that you breath.

     

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  342.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 12:30pm

    Re: Re: Re:

    Again, we're confusing a legal right with a moral right. We're not discussing whether or not you have a legal right, we're discussing whether or not you ought to have such a legal right.

     

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  343.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 12:31pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Genius

    You cannot take an unlicensed copy of RHEL from a friend and install it. Trademark law prevents you from doing so.

    Huh?

     

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  344.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 12:31pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re:

    or, rather, you're confusing, not me.

     

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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 12:34pm

    Re: Re: Re:

    Anti pollution laws also exist (or should exist) to serve the public good. They're not exempt from that requirement. Neither is copy'right'. It shouldn't exist because someone has a natural right to it, we do not, it should exist to serve the public good.

     

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    Nicedoggy, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 12:35pm

    Re: Re: Re:

    Also if you are under the illusion that the government can do anything about it, you are mistaken, the people in this instance are the ones holding all the cards is not for you to decide how people should use something because for they are the ones that permit your deal to exist in the first place, those silly regulations worked well with entities that depend on the state to exist, it doesn't work so well on people who don't depend on the state for them to exist.

    Further your assertion that without copyrights, art would be pushed to powerful patrons and rich galavants is ridiculous, copyright empowers the big boys(the powerful patrons and rich galavants) already most movies, films and music are all "produced" by those people buying the rights of small content producers and being controlled by those people, case in point 90 or 80 percent of all music released is owned by 3 labels in the U.S., most movies are from the big studios, explain again how is that different from medieval times again?

     

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    Nicedoggy, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 12:39pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    Not for much longer, since those laws are meaningless and can't possibly be enforced to their fullest.

    I want to see anybody try to seize or arrest the millions of criminals in the U.S. alone without having to buy armor.

     

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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 12:41pm

    Re: Re: Re:

    But if I put my couch up for sale, and you want to buy it, BUT you don't agree on the value, I don't get paid and you still get the couch?

    No,you get to keep your stinky old couch and I can go build my own copy if I want to.

    That's not how it works and you know it.

    That's exactly how it works (although you may wish I *didn't* know it).

    Law enforcement must be able to somehow protect the "couch" owner.

    From the couch copier? Sounds kind of corrupt to me.

    And that is indeed what law enforcement is finally doing.

    What a shame.

    Which makes Mike Masnick and the rest of the freetards here very angry.

    And the IP-tards very happy.

     

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  349.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 12:43pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re:

    While "the Law" only represents the interests of those with the most power and influence.

    Remember the Golden Rule: Those with the gold make the rules.

     

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    Richard (profile), Apr 9th, 2011 @ 12:44pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:


    Why should there be only one way? Why should every artists be required to sell according to your rules? Doesn't it make more sense to allow the seller to set their terms and then let the consumer decide on a case by case basis if those terms are reasonable?

    Because the two systems are incompatible. To work properly each requires that you make an assumption about any work you come across. The assumption that everything is free to use without constraint is necessary if the economics of the free model are to succeed fully (otherwise you get what are usually called "chilling effect".

    Likewise, as your discussion with the AC's shows, once people start assuming anything but "all rights reserved" the copyright system is undermined. The 'AA's and the BSA know this well and consequently often complain about CC and GPL as a result.

    The world really has to make up it's mind. In the end I think the free distribution/pay upfront model will win out but there will be a lot of whinging before we get there.

     

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    Karl (profile), Apr 9th, 2011 @ 12:46pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    oh look, we're back to Karl reading into the law what he wants to see.

    Oh look, another ad hominem attack by a faceless coward whose understanding of the law is even worse than mine.

    copyright does promote progress by protecting artists.

    Nowhere in copyright law, nor the Constitution, does the phrase "protecting artists" appear. Who's reading into the law now?

    On the other hand, here are some phrases that do appear in case law:
    Congress, then, by this act, instead of sanctioning an existing right, as contended, created it.
    - Wheaton v. Peters
    It may seem unfair that much of the fruit of the compiler's labor may be used by others without compensation. As Justice Brennan has correctly observed, however, this is not "some unforeseen byproduct of a statutory scheme." It is, rather, "the essence of copyright," and a constitutional requirement. The primary objective of copyright is not to reward the labor of authors, but "[t]o promote the Progress of Science and useful Arts."
    - Feist v. Rural (citations omitted)

    You could argue that it's possible for copyright to benefit both the public and artists, and that the underlying "contract" between the public and artists was fundamentally sound. In fact, I would agree with you.

    But as the law stands right now, this is absolutely not true. It does not benefit the public very much at all. And, in fact, it does not benefit artists very much, either. The primary beneficiaries are the rich and powerful "patrons" (i.e. corporations) who hold the purse strings, who dictate what can and cannot be published, and who have a legal monopoly used to quash the competition.

     

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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 12:48pm

    Re: Re:

    If the public believes a law is wrong, like slavery, there will be a majority of people that congregate and change the law.

    There is nothing resembling a majority that say copyright is wrong.

    Just a minority that find it annoying; those that consume in society but do not contribute back. Leeches.

    it's my moral right to copy as I please

    And I think it's my moral right to come over and repeatedly kick you in the balls.

    But breaking the law seems rather immoral to me, so maybe you should reassess your copying and I shouldn't put my boots on just yet...

     

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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 12:48pm

    Re: Re: Re:

    If you have the right to that license, I'll be happy to pay.

    Since the discussion is about moral rights, I have every bit as much right to that license and anyone does to any IP license, which you have been supporting. Now pay up, freetard!

    Oh, wait, you're not a freetard. You're a hypocrite. I guess you won't pay then.

     

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    Memyself, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 12:48pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    Morality is subjective. There is no true definitive moral or amoral rule. I pointed out early on that the only means to examine this issue is a legal one.

     

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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 12:50pm

    Re: Re: Re:

    I can prove that I have the right to my license, the one for music.

    The moral right? Go ahead, prove it.

     

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    JayBlanc, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 12:51pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re:

    Tell you what, I'll go ask my friend who just self published an album via all these new e-publishing forms, if they think they shouldn't have copyright on it... But I think I know what the answer is going to be. Or I could ask the friends who are e-book publishers, writers, and screen-writers if they could still do what they do without copyright.

    I see a lot of "I want it free" weenies arguing against having any kind of Copyright at all. I see very few, if any, of the people who actually produce the content they want arguing against Copyright.

     

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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 12:53pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    I pointed out early on that the only means to examine this issue is a legal one.

    Legality does not equal morality. That's why the wheels fall off the IP-tards carts when they start arguing morality, which was kind of the point of Mike's article.

     

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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 12:54pm

    Re: Re: Re:

    "If the public believes a law is wrong, like slavery, there will be a majority of people that congregate and change the law."

    We have to start somewhere, and these discussions offer a starting point.

    "Just a minority that find it annoying; those that consume in society but do not contribute back. Leeches."

    You must be referring to the **AA and the corporations, who consume the benefits of their monopoly rents over cableco and airwave broadcasting and content but do not produce anything. The majority of people do not believe in these laws, ie: see China.

     

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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 12:56pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    Tell you what, I'll go ask my friend... blah blah blah ....

    Oh, well, I guess that proves it then.

     

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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 12:57pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    "I pointed out early on that the only means to examine this issue is a legal one."

    So if the law made killing your first born mandatory, then doing so is moral.

     

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  361.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 1:00pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    "I see a lot of "I want it free" weenies arguing against having any kind of Copyright at all."

    No, just because people are arguing against copy'right' doesn't mean they are saying that they want it free. Maybe they will pay for it without such privileges.

    "I see very few, if any, of the people who actually produce the content they want arguing against Copyright"

    Plenty of content does get produced under CC licenses, licenses at least partly designed to circumvent copy'right' laws. and people who produce that content probably also consume content as well.

     

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    Memyself, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 1:00pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    You seem to willfully ignore context. All of those instances are art being sold as art.

     

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    Memyself, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 1:02pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    Apparently, you only see what you want to see. Attributing false arguments to me in an effort to advance your own failing arguments serves no purpose.

     

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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 1:02pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    What's art supposed to be sold as, flying monkeys?

     

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    Memyself, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 1:03pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    And I stated very early on in this discussion that morality is subjective and is of little value in the discussion. I'm discussing the legal aspect. Not the moral one.

     

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    Memyself, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 1:06pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    Where did I say that? Oh right. Never.

     

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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 1:06pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    "morality is subjective and is of little value in the discussion."

    It maybe of little value to an amoral person like you, but that doesn't mean that it's of little value to others. Just because you have no morals outside of law doesn't mean others don't.

    "I'm discussing the legal aspect. Not the moral one."

    But we're discussing the moral aspect, not the legal one. We all know the legal aspect, but that's not what we're discussing.

     

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    Nicedoggy, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 1:06pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    Michaelangelo, Da Vince, Cicero, Archimedes, Mary Shelly, Bram Stocker, Mozart, Beethoven, Shakespeare etc etc etc, there is actually a couple of thousand years worth of culture out there.

    In modern I could copy, use and sell, Big Bucks Bunny and others.
    Aside from that I want to know when financial incentives cease to exist if ever copyrights disappear.

    Are writers not paid to give lecturers?
    Are musicians not paid to perform live or to endorse something?
    Are movie makers not able to sell anything despite competition?

    Are those not financial incentives?
    Or is that you think they are just not enough?

     

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    Memyself, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 1:07pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    Then make a strong case for it. You're the one who want to change the existing system. Why should things change just because you want them to?

     

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    Memyself, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 1:09pm

    Re: Re:

    Who claimed that no books would be written without copyright? The question is whether or not the current output would be maintained.

     

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    JayBlanc, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 1:15pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re:

    First... It always amuses me when people post on the internet, something created primarily by government funding, and maintained by mutual agreements between governments and government funded bodies (ICANN et al), that they have no dependancy on the state.

    Second. You mistake distributors for publishers. And the difference to medieval times is there were no such thing as "independent labels" at all. In fact, no one published music for sale! If there were such thing as music recordings, no one would sell them, because they couldn't get any return on the investment without some kind of right to restrict copies. You'll have to make do with the occasional performance by a passing musician, who will only perform as much as you pay for each time, and will only perform what they know.

    Let's extrapolate on from then to now without copyright.

    TV and Radio are live performances only. No actor or singer will consent to be recorded for TV or Radio re-play, since they want the money from performances. If they were recorded, then the TV station could keep playing it without ever having to pay them again! TV Stations that re-broadcast recordings were boycotted by the actors guilds, and sued for loss of income. Private recordings from broadcasts were common till widespread encryption and black-box display devices were forced on the networks by performers guilds.

    Films are still a novelty. Since they are so easy to copy, no one ever made the huge amounts actors demand to have their performances recorded. There was no "Gone with the Wind", no one would throw away that amount of money on something for the masses. There are art-house cinema movies, commissioned by patrons who can afford it, and circulated in small numbers to their friends and political allies.

    There has been a boom of print on demand... To self destructing paper.

    Only the nobel minded publish anything to the internet, and there are certainly no online movie rentals because no one would put their exclusive expensive commissioned art-house film where they can be copied!

     

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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 1:16pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    I'm not saying that things should change just because I want them to, I'm saying that I'm part of the reason that things should change because, as a member of society, the government should partly represent me (instead of only representing its corporate sponsors, which is currently the case). Then I'm telling others, and hopefully the government, what changes I would like to be made, because for the government to represent me, I must communicate my position, and I'm telling others the reasoning behind my position so that others can consider it and perhaps they will hold the same position. If they agree with my reasoning, and if enough people agree, then things should change because the will of the government should serve the will of the people.

    After all, why should copy'right' last 95+ years just because big corporations want that? The government is clearly not representing the will of the people and that's partly why I think things should change.

     

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    Memyself, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 1:19pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    It doesn't matter. This isn't your website and a lack of clear terms set by the owner does not equate to you having the right to govern terms. Furthermore, you would be very unlikely to be granted a copyright for the post as-is, and even if you were, you cannot charge people to look at something you posted in public on a public site.

    Go ahead and file for copyright. If you are granted one (you won't be), then you will have made your point.

     

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    JayBlanc, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 1:20pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    Find me a professional screen play writer who will say they could make a living without copyright.

    Just one.

     

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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 1:20pm

    Re: Re: Re:

    Such doomsday scenarios are often suggested

     

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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 1:23pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    "In fact, no one published music for sale!"

    But music was still produced.

    "TV and Radio are live performances only. No actor or singer will consent to be recorded for TV or Radio re-play, since they want the money from performances."

    Actors and singers generally do not hold the copy'right' over such broadcasted performances already, yet they consent to such things.

    "If they were recorded, then the TV station could keep playing it without ever having to pay them again!"

    That's already the case, because the TV stations often hold the copy'rights' already. Yet these things are still created.

     

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    Memyself, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 1:24pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    I never said legality equals morality. As I said earlier - morality is subjective.

     

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    Memyself, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 1:27pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    If the entire culture in question agreed on this action, then yes. Morality is defined by society. It used to be considered moral to own slaves. It used to be considered moral to burn heretics. In some cultures, it was considered moral to perform ritual sacrifices. Treating women as property was considered the just and moral thing to do.

    Morality is an empty word that only means what we decide it to mean.

     

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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 1:28pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    (and the same thing with music, it's the record labels that hold the 'rights', the artists only get paid a small fraction of their costs from selling music. Most of their money comes from concerts).

    But, even so, T.V. stations need content for people to see their advertising and so they will pay actors to perform without copy'right'. Do you honestly think that "No actor or singer will consent to be recorded for TV or Radio re-play," What about American Idol? I bet you on techdirt alone there are some people who would love the opportunity to have themselves and singing broadcasted to the world because of the benefits they can gain. See, there is value in being broadcasted, and that value can be used to produce content.

    "Only the nobel minded publish anything to the internet"

    The No true Scotsman fallacy.

     

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    Memself, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 1:28pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    According to the person I am discussing this with, apparently it is meant to be sold as if it were a car or a house.

     

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  381.  
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    Memyself, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 1:32pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    You have no morals outside societal conditioning. You might think otherwise. But you're wrong.

    Last I checked, you were not the arbiter on what can and cannot be discussed.

    It is true that framing the discussion as one of morals is false, as the article above claims. But that is true of anything in society. Morals change depending on society. Basing laws off morality alone only creates absurd laws. Which unless I am mistaken, was one of the original points made in the original article.

    Maybe you should check exactly what is under discussion again. I'm not sure you grasped it the first time.

     

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  382.  
    identicon
    Anonymous Coward, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 1:35pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    This isn't your website and a lack of clear terms set by the owner does not equate to you having the right to govern terms.

    He wasn't claiming it for the entire website.

    Furthermore, you would be very unlikely to be granted a copyright for the post as-is

    As long as you remain so ignorant of the actuality of copyright law, your posts on the subject will probably continue to make little sense.

    ...you cannot charge people to look at something you posted in public on a public site.

    Or to download something you found in a public place? Regardless of copyright? You're arguing against yourself now. (BTW, Techdirt is a privately owned website. You are a guest here.)

     

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  383.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 1:37pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    I never said legality equals morality.

    Which is why there is moral argument for copyright law.

     

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  384.  
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    Memyself, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 1:37pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    Your argument seems to be (and please correct me if I ma mistaken) that the way people sell products of their own labor should be dictated by you (and those you represent). My point is that no one is forcing you to participate in those transactions, just as no one is currently dictating how an artists distributes their work.

     

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  385.  
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    Burt Fisher, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 1:38pm

    Re: Re: Re:

    That is a good point and I was wondering why no one is talking about the merits of the original article, but instead about personal philosophies unrelated to law and copyright. Even in the original, he says "the correct policy response to these objections as such is: Cry me a fucking river; now piss off." Does anyone challenge that statement? How about my ability to quote those words... is that a copyright problem?

    I haven't read all the replies yet, but someone is bound to mention patents and trademarks, which also do not appear in the original article, and are also red herrings, a.k.a. personal philosophies.

     

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  386.  
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    Memyself, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 1:42pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    I would rewrite your posts as well, but -

    1: It's a bullshit thing to do.

    2: I don't want to waste my time reworking your exceptionally poor sense of spelling and grammar.

    3: I don't need to. Your argument falls apart just fine without my involvement.

     

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  387.  
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    Karl (profile), Apr 9th, 2011 @ 1:45pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    Tell you what, I'll go ask my friend who just self published an album via all these new e-publishing forms, if they think they shouldn't have copyright on it... But I think I know what the answer is going to be. Or I could ask the friends who are e-book publishers, writers, and screen-writers if they could still do what they do without copyright.

    Or, I could ask my friends who were in bands on major labels if they believe the current copyright system benefits them over the labels.

    Oh, wait, I have.

    Look, there's no question that copyright benefits some artists some of the time. The question is, considering all artists all of the time, whether they're hurt or harmed more by copyright laws.

    I believe they are harmed, because copyright enables the creation of corporate rights holders, who themselves create nothing, but reap all the economic benefits of creators' works.

    And let's not forget that artists and publishers are not supposed to be the primary beneficiaries of copyright law. The primary beneficiaries are the public. They benefit by incintivizing the creation of additional works, for the public's use.

    Here is what you should ask your friends. Two questions: "Would you be better off, or worse, if your publishers were not allowed to control the copyrights on your creations?" And: "If copyright was not around, would you still write?"

    I see a lot of "I want it free" weenies arguing against having any kind of Copyright at all. I see very few, if any, of the people who actually produce the content they want arguing against Copyright.

    I produce music, as do most of my friends. When I let them know of stuff like the ICE seizure of domain names without notice, every single one of them is appalled.

     

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  388.  
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    Memyself, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 1:47pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    And this is you taking my arguments completely out of context. Getting rather tired of this practice.

     

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  389.  
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    Nicedoggy, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 1:48pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Genius

    I was being a douche calling you an idiot, but now I just want to state the obvious, you are an idiot.

    Quote:
    If I distribute GPL'd software for a fee, am I required to also make it available to the public without a charge?

    No. However, if someone pays your fee and gets a copy, the GPL gives them the freedom to release it to the public, with or without a fee. For example, someone could pay your fee, and then put her copy on a web site for the general public.


    I could even become an unauthorized reseller if I wanted too.

    Quote:
    Does the GPL allow me to sell copies of the program for money?

    Yes, the GPL allows everyone to do this. The right to sell copies is part of the definition of free software. Except in one special situation, there is no limit on what price you can charge. (The one exception is the required written offer to provide source code that must accompany binary-only release.)


    http://www.gnu.org/licenses/gpl-faq.html
    Now please shows us all were in the law says I can't do that.
    Because you know without the specific law, you are telling stories about unicorns LoL

     

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  390.  
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    Nicedoggy, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 1:51pm

    Patents are about to get more ridiculous since the USPTO has just "automated" some of petitions LoL

    USPTO Automates Eight Patent Petition Types
    http://www.uspto.gov/patents/process/file/efs/guidance/ePetition-FAQs.jsp

     

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  391.  
    identicon
    Nicedoggy, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 2:00pm

    Quote:
    Why were these petitions selected for automatic processing rather then other petition types?

    These petitions were selected due to high volume requests. The USPTO has determined these petitions could be automated and do not require reviews as complex as other petition types.


    Quote:
    How long does it take to have the petitions granted?

    If all items are correctly filed, ePetitions are automatically granted at the time they are filed through EFS Web.


    http://www.uspto.gov/patents/process/file/efs/guidance/ePetition-FAQs.jsp#heading-3

     

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  392.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 2:06pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Genius

    I was being a douche calling you an idiot, but now I just want to state the obvious, you are an idiot.

    Why am I an idiot when you're the one that's clearly wrong?

    Read the following very carefully. If it doesn't make sense, read it again. If it still doesn't make sense, ask a smarter friend to explain it to you.

    RedHat has done an "end-run" of sorts around the GPL by incorporating their trademarks throughout the software. Trademark law is a completely separate branch of law than copyright law. The GPL does not also require you to donate your trademarks. So, while you can certainly download RHEL and even the source code for it, you then have to go through an onerous auditing process to scrub all of RedHat's (and other) trademarks out of the system before you can legally redistribute it. This is what CentOS and other distributions have to do.

    Apparently this is not very easy, since RHEL 6 came out 5 months ago, and CentOS 6 (the equivalent build) is not ready yet.

    Here is a list of all the packages that still have to be manually audited in preparation for a release of CentOS free of trademark restrictions.

    Now please shows us all were in the law says I can't do that.

    This is that law. There. Now please kindly apologize for calling me an idiot when it is your ignorance on display here.

    If you still refuse to believe any of this, you might want to head over and update the Wikipedia entry for RHEL to correct the following statement, which you assert is wrong:

    While trademark restrictions prevent free re-distribution of officially supported versions of Red Hat Enterprise Linux, compliance with open source licenses requires Red Hat to freely provide the source code for the distribution's software.

    Please don't complain when your changes are swiftly reverted.

     

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  393.  
    identicon
    Nicedoggy, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 2:09pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    Funny I think the same thing about yours LoL

     

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  394.  
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    Karl (profile), Apr 9th, 2011 @ 2:11pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    First... It always amuses me when people post on the internet, something created primarily by government funding, and maintained by mutual agreements between governments and government funded bodies (ICANN et al), that they have no dependancy on the state.

    "State funded" does not equal "government controlled." Certainly, at this point, the internet is not dependent on any government at all.

    As an interesting side note, none of the works produced by the government are covered by copyright. Yet they still get produced.

    And the difference to medieval times is there were no such thing as "independent labels" at all. In fact, no one published music for sale!

    This is completely false. Music publishers were offering sheet music, for sale, long before copyright existed. Likewise, there were privately funded opera houses and theaters that were open to the public. Look at the biography of Handel if you don't believe me.

    TV and Radio are live performances only.

    Most TV and radio actors did not, and do not, get royalties from re-broadcasting. A few do, most don't. The vast majority are "work for hire," like the majority of people who work for the studios in general. "Work for hire" artists don't retain the rights to their works.

    Films are still a novelty. Since they are so easy to copy, no one ever made the huge amounts actors demand to have their performances recorded.

    Here's an interesting tidbit: Hollywood was founded on piracy. Look up the Motion Picture Patents Company, aka the "Edison Trust."

    there are certainly no online movie rentals

    In this age where piracy is ubiquitous, trivially easy, and relatively risk-free - Netflix is making money hand over foot.

    Frankly, your scenario doesn't make sense. These things would still be produced without copyright.

     

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  395.  
    identicon
    Nicedoggy, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 2:13pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    Why should I most people agree to that do they not?
    I bet even you agree to that one.

    Now copyBS, ask anyone on the streets if they agree to it and you hear the answer loud and clear.

    CopyBS only benefits a minority that can't even justify it properly so why again people should respect and uphold that crap?

     

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  396.  
    identicon
    Nicedoggy, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 2:16pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    Well then you know how we do feel about you misrepresenting everything others say to fit your views LoL

     

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  397.  
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    Karl (profile), Apr 9th, 2011 @ 2:29pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    These things would still be produced without copyright.

    Addendum:

    I will give you props, though. By asking whether content would otherwise be produced, you are asking the right question. Not only that, you are asking the only relevant question.

    The answer may not be what you think, however. Mike has posted some case studies that show how intellectual output increases when fewer copyright restrictions are granted. I'm too busy to hunt them down right now.

     

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  398.  
    identicon
    JayBlanc, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 2:43pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    Actually, Actors and Writers *do* hold a portion of the copyright to those recordings. And that's why they either sign over them for a up front sum, normal for things like advertising or things like PSAs, or they seek residuals that are paid each time the recording is rebroadcast.

    ps. I'm a former profesional actor. Don't try to bull**** me over what I got paid to do.

     

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  399.  
    identicon
    JayBlanc, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 2:58pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    "Or, I could ask my friends who were in bands on major labels if they believe the current copyright system benefits them over the labels.

    Oh, wait, I have."

    There's a problem here... "do you believe the current copyright system benefits you over the labels" is a lot different that "do you believe you should have any copyrights in your work at all?" There's a world of difference between "Rights can too easily be taken by abusive labels, and have overly long terms" and "There should be no copyrights at all!"

    Try telling your friends that you don't think they should be able to prevent a rival band copying their work and passing it off as their own? See how they'll react to that, because that's what "no copyrights" means.

    And I don't have to ask if my writer friends would stop writing without copyright around for them to make profit from the act of publishing. I know they wouldn't stop writing. But I do know they wouldn't put all their time into it anymore. Most of them certainly won't publish again, because getting a book professionally edited to correct errors and make it fit to read costs in the region of $15,000 a book. I have friends who have gone into e-publishing, and they rely on having books that were published in print first so they don't have to upfront on the editing costs. Where they do have a book that's not been edited, they're having to struggle to get the costs sorted out. They currently offset based on their scriptwriting work, which would of course dry up without copyright keeping the film production a big business.

    For the most, it would mean turning their careers into occasional pastimes. Mostly for the enjoyment of their friends. Perhaps defraying their costs with donations and merchandise, occasionally getting burnt when someone takes their work and puts them up on their own site with merchandising that undercuts them.

    The pool of professional writers would get a lot lot lot smaller.

     

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  400.  
    identicon
    Anonymous Coward, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 2:59pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    Now copyBS, ask anyone on the streets if they agree to it and you hear the answer loud and clear.

    You spend too much time in the echo chamber. Read the comments on any tech site that's not this one:

    Here, for example, and you'll see that widespread hatred of copyright simply doesn't exist. And that's on Slashdot, the original "this year will be the year of Linux on the desktop!" site. Imagine how wrong you are with respect to the general population.

     

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  401.  
    identicon
    Anonymous Coward, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 3:02pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    "You have no morals outside societal conditioning. You might think otherwise. But you're wrong."

    What?

    "Last I checked, you were not the arbiter on what can and cannot be discussed. "

    No one said I was. You can continue to look foolish by going off topic and not addressing the points made, but don't expect others to take you seriously.

    "Morals change depending on society."

    So if a society thinks murder is moral, then it must be so.

    "Basing laws off morality alone only creates absurd laws. "

    What should laws be based off of, immorality? and if copy'right' laws aren't based off of morality, then what are they based off of?

    "Which unless I am mistaken, was one of the original points made in the original article."

    There is a difference between saying that laws should be based off of morality and saying that not everything is a moral issue. Whether I choose to drink a glass of water right now vs 10 minutes for now is not a moral issue and there is no law dictating when I must drink my glass of water. But if a law is to exist, there generally should be some moral basis for its existence. Laws that prohibit behavior should generally only prohibit immoral behavior.

     

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  402.  
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    RadialSkid (profile), Apr 9th, 2011 @ 3:03pm

    Re: Re: Re:

    If you don't want to pay me for my work, then don't avail yourself to my labor.

    No danger of that. Although if you don't want anyone to view or listen to content you create, you should probably considering not publishing it in the first place.

     

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  403.  
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    RadialSkid (profile), Apr 9th, 2011 @ 3:05pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re:

    Dammit, "consider," not "considering."

     

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  404.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 3:06pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    Then those who support the laws can voluntarily comply with it without its existence. I take it you fear that enough people don't believe in the existence of these laws to comply with them?

     

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  405.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 3:08pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    As techdirt has shown in the past, many of those comments in support of copy'right' laws come from places like (IP) law firms. Sure, they probably use Tor and proxies now and they do a better job at hiding their source, but that doesn't change the fact.

     

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  406.  
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    RadialSkid (profile), Apr 9th, 2011 @ 3:09pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    The question is, will you shut up after that?

    Sadly for you, it wouldn't be that easy. A step in the right direction is still only one step.

     

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  407.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 3:13pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    ] The question is, will you shut up after that?

    Sadly for you, it wouldn't be that easy. A step in the right direction is still only one step.


    As I suspected, retroactive copyright extension is indeed a red herring for you. It's your Sudetenland. It's what you use to distract people from your full but hidden agenda.

    Color me unsurprised.

     

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  408.  
    identicon
    JayBlanc, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 3:15pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    1) Look up what ICANN actually is, and who they get their grant of authority from.

    2) Look up the Grants of Privilege and Printer Monopoly, and how they were applied to Sheet Music.

    3) Understand that Handel was around when Grants of Privilege and Printer Monopolies were being formalised into Copyright Law.

    4) Understand that often "Public" theatres and opera houses still required strong patronage to commission the works they produced, merely defraying some of their costs by opening to public subscription.

    5) Look up what 'Work for Hire' actually is. Look up what a 'Residual' is and what the SAG basic contract is.

    Perhaps consider claiming to know what you are talking about may be a mistake when you do not.

     

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  409.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 3:18pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    "And that's on Slashdot, the original "this year will be the year of Linux on the desktop!""

    Then where are all the pro-IP blogs with open comments? Why is it that only these anti-IP blogs can get such a large audience but pro-IP blogs can not? So much so that IP maximists have to leech off of the bandwidth of anti-IP blogs to promote their propaganda? Could it be because IP maximists know that no one would visit their own blogs?

    Your point is that slashdot and techdirt allow people like you to comment. The mainstream media, on the other hand, uses the government to wrongfully enforce its monopoly on public airwaves and then they deny IP critics like MM the ability to comment. Despite this, IP maximists generally don't start their own blogs with open comments because they can't get enough of an audience on their blogs that agree with them. So they go where the audience is, anti-IP blogs. But why are the audiences located on anti-IP blogs? Maybe it's because the audience doesn't like IP?

    Just because IP maximists like yourself are allowed to comment on anti-IP blogs hardly means that the population is in favor of IP. If anything, the fact that anti-IP blogs have a much larger audience suggests that people don't like IP.

    Despite the fact that IP maximists use taxpayer money to fund their propaganda, despite the fact that they use government imposed monopolies to deny others criticisms over various information distribution channels, despite the fact that these things do affect public opinion, they are still having a hard time acquiring an audience. Why is it that IP maximists must resort to the censorship of criticisms where possible (ie: public airwaves)? Is it because they know very well that the population would be far more intolerable of these laws if they were exposed to those criticisms and if they weren't only exposed to pro-IP propaganda?

     

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  410.  
    identicon
    Anonymous Coward, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 3:20pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    Aw c'mon Dave, you're really going to post anonymously and complain people might be hiding their identities?

     

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  411.  
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    RadialSkid (profile), Apr 9th, 2011 @ 3:20pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    you'll see that widespread hatred of copyright simply doesn't exist.

    Two words: Operation Payback.

     

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  412.  
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    Nicedoggy, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 3:22pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Genius

    Quote:
    4.3 Marks. Unless expressly stated in an Order Form, no right or license, express or implied, is granted in this Agreement for the use of any Red Hat, Red Hat Affiliate, Client or third party trade names, service marks or trademarks, including, without limitation, the distribution of the Software utilizing any Red Hat or Red Hat Affiliate trademarks.


    Source: Red Hat Enterprise Agreement

    Here is my apology:

    I'm an idiot, and acted like a jackass longing for some public shame, my sincere apologizes for calling you and idiot, you were right about Red Hat being able to stop others from using a verbatim copy of the enterprise edition without scrubbing the trademarks.

    Also I want to thank you for enriching my knowledge.

    However that doesn't mean I will not act like an idiot in the future and not call you one again. I reserve the right to be an idiot from time to time :)

     

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  413.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 3:33pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    I'm not complaining that people might be hiding their identities. You can hide your identity all you want, its your right. I'm just pointing out that IP law firms aren't representative of the general population yet IP law firms do make at least some of the anti IP comments. I really don't think that the number of alleged pro-IP vs anti IP anonymous commenters are a good indication of how much people like IP.

    But, of the unanonymous commentors (and techdirt has many of those as well) I do notice that the pro-IP blogs have fewer than the anti-IP blogs. and the Internet seems to have far more anti IP unanonymous commenters than pro IP unanonymous ones. Or at least commenters that disagree with our current system. The number of unanonymous commenters is a much better indication and that's where IP maximists seem to fail miserably.

     

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  414.  
    identicon
    Anonymous Coward, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 3:35pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    (and, no I don't have any statistics to prove it, it's just an observation).

     

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  415.  
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    Dark Tech (profile), Apr 9th, 2011 @ 3:38pm

    re (not!) "Deserving Copy rights..." Eactly right!

    Exactly correct, Mike, the lawyers and LEGALISTS have pushed "copyright" laws & powers TOO FAR.
    A textbook example is war photos of INJURED, KILLED, and DISPLACED persons. The photographer, his agency, and his publisher(s) ALL DEMAND "COPY RIGHTS" for those images, the images which often sell newspapers, magazines (and, for example, during Vietnam war, Gulf War 1, & invasion of Iraq) sold TV air time.
    But WHAT ABOUT THE VICTIMS' RIGHTS? For example, Robert Capa's famous photo of Spanish democrat soldier Federico Borrell Garcia falling, the moment he is shot and killed by one of Franco's troops bullets.
    http://www.fotoart.gr/photography/history/historyphotos/onephotoonestory/spanichwar.htm
    Undoubtedly, LIFE, Capa, and others had copyrights on the picture, but the notion that Capa's heirs are ENTITLED to MONEY from the death of another who gave his life to his fellow citizens & country is not only absurd, but more than a little ghoulish.
    btw, I would recommend the book, "REQUIEM" - photos only by Vietnam War photographers who paid the ultimate price -
    http://www.amazon.com/Requiem-Photographers-Died-Vietnam-Indochina/dp/0679456570
    as THE SINGLE BEST BOOK of the Vietnam war (it starts during the French phase, continues through the American "advisors" & military buildup, to major US combat, and exit.)
    The idea that HEIRS should BENEFIT, DECADES LATER, from the sacrifice & terror captured in these photos is sad.

     

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  416.  
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    RadialSkid (profile), Apr 9th, 2011 @ 3:44pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    Try telling your friends that you don't think they should be able to prevent a rival band copying their work and passing it off as their own? See how they'll react to that, because that's what "no copyrights" means.

    BZZZZZZT! Wrong! Copyright law does not apply to plagiarism.

     

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  417.  
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    Nicedoggy, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 3:49pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    Did you try typing "f. copyrights", "f. IP", "f. the mafiaa", you be surprised by what you find :)

     

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  418.  
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    RadialSkid (profile), Apr 9th, 2011 @ 3:53pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    There is nothing hidden about my agenda. I have always been upfront in my beliefs about the radical scaling back - if not elimination - of copyright.

    Then again, you copywhiners frequently behave as if you're only talking to one person, so I'll forgive you if you're confusing me for someone else.

     

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  419.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 4:00pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    Besides, IP maximists keep on complaining about the piracy rate. If so many people so strongly believed in these laws, why are they so worried about the piracy rates?

     

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  420.  
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    Charlie Potatoes, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 4:33pm

    Re:

    When I paid Ford Motor Credit $22,000 I assumed that somewhere in that price was a little something for the man or woman who 'created' my Mustang. Same with my house and my furniture. Hell yes I paid. And when someone wants to read the novel that I worked on for two years, well... yes, I think its morally right that they should pay me. You can say that 'morals' are irrelevant all you want, but we all expect compensation. Check out John Locke.

     

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    Charlie Potatoes, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 4:35pm

    Re:

    You pay back your parents by raising your own children. quid pro quo.

     

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    wvhillbilly (profile), Apr 9th, 2011 @ 4:42pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Copyright trolls

    I'm not saying copyright should be done away with. What I am saying is that there needs to be some exercise of common sense in the application of it. Copyright can't give all benefit and rights to one side and leave nothing to the other side, otherwise it loses its purpose for being.

     

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  423.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 4:58pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Copyright trolls

    Fine. Then do what most of your peers here refuse to do and take a consistent, explicit position on specific reforms you want. Hating copyright in the abstract is not a productive position.

     

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  424.  
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    Gene Cavanaugh, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 5:06pm

    Copyright and entitlement

    Wow! We are presently (well, the GOP, anyway) fighting entitlements, even though a lot of it is designed to protect the public health (who needs people starving to death, or dying of a disease, on their doorstep?), and benefits people who are working hard to make our lives better (but have lost a breadwinner, and need help to educate their children, etc.).

    BUT, if someone sits around strumming a guitar, or pretending to be an artist, they are "entitled"?

    The artists that made a difference (Harriet Beecher Stowe, Shakespeare, Bach, Mozart - on and on), NONE of them had the "benefit" of a copyright "welfare package"!

     

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  425.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 5:07pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Copyright trolls

    They don't actually care about the majority of what they spew. Copyright length? The majority of the stuff they rip off is less than a couple years old.

    It's all a smokescreen to try and evade the fact that they mainly just think they should be able to avail themselves to someone else's labor without paying for it.

    They aren't convincing anyone, but they are publicly demonstrating what a problem they are and why government needed to step in.

     

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  426.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 5:10pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    I want that choice abolished

    Tough.

     

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  427.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 5:13pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Copyright trolls

    It's only a 'problem' because IP maximists make it a problem. I can make anything I wish into a problem. You're breathing free air and not paying me, that's a problem. The government needs to step in.

    Just because you define something as a 'problem' doesn't mean the government should step in.

    and if people strongly believed in these laws enough they would likely follow such principles without these laws. Perhaps the reason the government 'needs' to step in is because people don't believe in these laws all that strongly.and if people don't really believe in these laws, then maybe the problem is with the laws. The government should represent what the people want, not what you want. Just because others don't believe what you believe doesn't mean there is a problem.

     

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    Nicedoggy, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 5:17pm

    Re: Re:

    Well then you have no problem with me buying your book and renting it without paying you anything after all in the price of that book I paid I assume you got a little something amiright or what?

    Did you paid Ford Motors for all the R&D necessary to produce that car? Did you paid the engineers for the project?
    Of course you didn't paid the full price, you didn't even paid enough to pay one designer for a year and those things could take a decade to come to market, so what you paid by your own standards is not enough.

     

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  429.  
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    Nicedoggy, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 5:18pm

    Re: Re:

    Fine I will pay you writing a book for others. quid pro quo.

     

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    wvhillbilly (profile), Apr 9th, 2011 @ 5:22pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Genius

    "So, while you can certainly download RHEL and even the source code for it, you then have to go through an onerous auditing process to scrub all of RedHat's (and other) trademarks out of the system before you can legally redistribute it."

    If I recall correctly, that's only if you modify it. I could be wrong but that's the way I remember it.

     

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  431.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 5:24pm

    Re: Re:

    "And when someone wants to read the novel that I worked on for two years, well... yes, I think its morally right that they should pay me."

    It's morally right to give to charity, but it's not a moral obligation. and it shouldn't be a legal one either.


    "but we all expect compensation."

    Who are you to speak for everyone.

    and the flute player who plays his flute on the streets in hopes that people who enjoy his music will put money in his can also expects compensation for his labor. But if a passerby enjoys his music and doesn't provide compensation, is there anything wrong with that? Should the law force that person to compensate the flute player? Just because someone expects something doesn't mean the law should provide it. and, if many people like the persons music, they may compensate him. The flute player may expect compensation for his work, but it's not a moral imperative that everyone who enjoys his work should compensate him and neither should it be a legal imperative. and the flute player can get some compensation from those willing to pay without the law requiring it.

     

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    Memyself, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 5:29pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    Then point out an instance in this discussion where I have done any such thing. Your childish trolling is growing tiresome.

     

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    Memyself, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 5:30pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    Troll.

     

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  434.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 5:31pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    say he "can't charge you" for something he writes

    Funny, I never said that.

    But coming from you, a person that consistently winds up on the incorrect side of every debate or discussion on this site, that is no surprise.

    If a person doesn't understand a situation, they're usually safe either morally or legally, karma/jeopardy wise. Trying to maliciously trick or entrap someone is quite often neither legal or moral. Feel free to nitpick and find some example that you think will negate most examples tho. I need a good chuckle today.

    But to address yet another one of your infamous sloppy false dichotomies:

    a) you believe it's immoral for him to charge for consuming his content

    I believe nothing of the sort. In fact, I invited him to charge for something, and offer it for sale to me.

    that your actions are not immoral solely because they are within the bounds of the law.

    bankers get paid to legally do things I believe immoral.

    So needless to say, no.

    So, there would be nothing immoral about repealing copyright in its entirety?

    As always, 2 + 2 = 5 to Karl.

     

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  435.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 5:31pm

    Re: Re:

    and if I spend 10 days making a hammer and sell it to a friend for $100, should I get compensated every time he uses it? If he sells the hammer to someone else and that person uses it, should I get compensated again? If he lets someone else borrow it and that person uses it, should I get compensated? If he makes copies of it and starts giving those copies away or selling them to others who use those copies, should I get compensated?

    Same thing with a book. You expect compensation, you can first prove your work is compensation worthy. Then you can charge people for the initial release. What they do after the initial release is their business. Just like with the hammer that I sold to my friend, what he does with it later (make copies, sell it, give copies of it away, etc...) is his business, not mine. I don't expect compensation every time someone else uses and benefits from that hammer or a copy of it.

     

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    Memyself, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 5:33pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    I'm all for copyright reform myself.

     

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  437.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 5:35pm

    Re: Re: Re:

    and the point is that why should copy'right' be any different. These laws should exist to serve the public good, not to ensure you get compensation every time someone makes a copy of your book. That's not the purpose of copy'right'. It's purpose is to promote the progress, not to compensate you for your work. There are other ways you can get compensation, like selling the first release at a premium to a large group of people who would be willing to each pitch in a small fraction of the cost. and then, what they do with their copies is their business.

     

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  438.  
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    Jay (profile), Apr 9th, 2011 @ 5:35pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    "And I don't have to ask if my writer friends would stop writing without copyright around for them to make profit from the act of publishing."

    Stop. Let's back up here for a second. The Huffington Post allows people to write on their platform free of charge. You can go to Blogger and create stories. People write on fanfiction.net for their own benefit by adding to canon.

    I'm pretty sure that they can write professionally or set up a website to gain an audience and do it themselves. Copyright doesn't really begin to enter the picture unless it's an argument about how much each book is worth.

    "Mostly for the enjoyment of their friends. Perhaps defraying their costs with donations and merchandise, occasionally getting burnt when someone takes their work and puts them up on their own site with merchandising that undercuts them.

    The pool of professional writers would get a lot lot lot smaller."

    If you're going to put writing on the spot, then make sure to cast the light both ways. Namely, professional writing has quite a number of fees installed. The Writer's Guild of America can be quite frustrating when you HAVE to be a member for Hollywood. Novel shopping can sure as hell be very hard to figure out because of all of the discussions that are involved. Also factor in agents vs self publishing and you have a lot of choices that all writers have to go through.

    I doubt the pool will be smaller, just a lot more diversified.

     

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  439.  
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    Jay (profile), Apr 9th, 2011 @ 5:36pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    Look into the game industry, that the Writer's Guild ignored for quite some time.

     

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  440.  
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    Nicedoggy, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 5:41pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Copyright trolls

    As opposed to defrauding the public with false claims?

     

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    Memyself, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 5:41pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    "What?"

    Exactly what I said. Morality is a reflection of the values of society. That morality is subject to change depending on the perceptions of society.

    "You can continue to look foolish by going off topic and not addressing the points made, but don't expect others to take you seriously."

    What point or question directed at me have I not addressed? My inclination is to call bullshit on your accusation.

    "So if a society thinks murder is moral, then it must be so."

    Ever hear of war? How about human sacrifice? How about burning people at the stake for being heretics? How about the Crusades? How about execution? Historically speaking, the killing of others has been considered a moral act on many occasions. I should not need to explain this basic fact to you.

    "What should laws be based off of, immorality? and if copy'right' laws aren't based off of morality, then what are they based off of?"

    Laws should be based off of the benefit to society, not the perceived "moral" value. Which was the point made in the original article as I read it.

    "There is a difference between saying that laws should be based off of morality and saying that not everything is a moral issue. Whether I choose to drink a glass of water right now vs 10 minutes for now is not a moral issue and there is no law dictating when I must drink my glass of water. But if a law is to exist, there generally should be some moral basis for its existence. Laws that prohibit behavior should generally only prohibit immoral behavior."

    And who decides what constitutes said "immoral" behavior? You?

     

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    Nicedoggy, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 5:47pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    Since the thread exploded I'm not particularly kin on the idea of sifting through all your posts to see which ones qualify, but I tell you what, when you do it again, I will stuck to your leg like a humping puppy and point it to you is that good enough?

     

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  443.  
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    Nicedoggy, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 5:48pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    OMG he reads minds!
    I was thinking the same thing about you.

     

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  444.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 5:51pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    I'm not the one saying that making copies is immoral, you are. I'm saying it's not immoral. If you want to claim it's immoral, if you want to restrict my behavior, then you need to justify it. I'm not telling you that it's immoral for you to breath the air you breath, so I don't have to justify allowing you to breath that air. I'm not telling you that you must copy others, if you don't want to, then don't. I'm not forcing my standard of morality on you, I'm not deciding for you what constitutes immoral behavior, but you're deciding for me what constitutes immoral behavior and hence you're forcing your standard of morality on me. Who are you to tel me what is and what isn't immoral behavior on my part. I'm in a better position to make that determination than you are.

     

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    Nicedoggy, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 5:57pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    As for the childish trolling part.
    That is exactly how I feel about your endless diatribes about your rights that never seem to take into account nobody else.

     

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  446.  
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    Jay (profile), Apr 9th, 2011 @ 6:00pm

    *coughs*

    "Without copyright, art would be the reserve of the rich who could pay the living costs of the creators. As it was *before* we had copyright, where you either had a patron who would take direct ownership of anything you produced. "

    Okay, I was drinking then this kind of came up on me.

    There's already a lot of digital alternatives to the patron system you're citing. And some artists might actually want such a system. We already have musicians traveling all around the world for fans. Going to a person's house for a private party doesn't seem like such a stretch when an artist isn't tied to touring for a CD promotion.

    "Or if you want a middle road with people able to make a living from art, and still have widespread distribution of art at affordable prices... You need copyright"

    Let's really look at copyright for a second here. What exactly does copyright do in gaining an audience, keeping an audience, or allowing a song to be used on the radio? We know that Leonardo da Vinci made sketches of tanks, helicopters, etc before they were known by those names. We know he made the Mona Lisa. If it's about accreditation, that's known. If you're saying it's about money, it's entirely a different ball game we're in.

    If you look at copyright law, it's not designed to be artist friendly. So let's move away from infringements and look at all of the licenses of copyright which are as follows:

    Link

    So if you're saying we need copyright, look there at the confusing patchwork to copyright law. What would be far better is if we allowed the artist to actually negotiate, not look into an individual licence for every. Last. Person in the stratosphere that needs to be paid, debiting the artist of their hard earned cash and soul. Hyperbole aside, it's not that copyright is needed. I would argue that a more stable environment that allows for more negotiation for the artist (read: weaker copyright laws) would allow for a much easier time of helping artists.

    "And you can forget "Advertising based Income" without copyright."

    False. There's Google adwords and gaining audiences for yourself, which plenty of writers, musicians, and self sufficient entrepreneurs are using along with other tools such as Kickstarter.

    "What's to stop a TV channel just showing your TV program with their own adverts, and not paying a dime for it."

    What's to stop you from putting the show on your own website and having other ways to earn money? Better yet, if a TV show is being advertised, what's to stop someone from putting up a Bittorrent, cutting out the commercials, and becoming a fan? There's other ways to make revenue here, and you seem to be limiting yourself.

    "Is Floor64 going to stand by the published remarks on Techdirt, and let someone start up a website, copy Techdirt's content, replace all the advertising with their own, and profit of their back?"

    You do realize that people read the articles and come back here, right? You also realize, that it's highly doubtful that someone else named Techdork, using a Mickey Masnim will fly very far without the infrastructure established?

    I suggest understanding where exactly the problem lies with copyright law. People use the TD articles as they see fit. We discuss them free of charge. But if someone wants to profit off the back (say discuss the problems herein with copyright or as a rebuttal to Mike's work) they are free to do so. How that's inherently wrong is what I'm having a hard time understanding.

     

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    Nicedoggy, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 6:02pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    The real truth may be that we lost respect for each other position and are not inclined to be nice to one another and that is fine by me.

    I got tired of the cool-aid references, I got tired of the accusations against Mike character that has nothing to do with the issues but keeps coming up every time, I got tired of those of you that keep saying "but...but...my rights" without never putting forth a real good reason why you people should a) have any rights b) need those rights.

    And I have discussing this crap for 10 years now, so you are not the only one tired.

     

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  448.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 6:04pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    "What point or question directed at me have I not addressed? My inclination is to call bullshit on your accusation."

    We were discussing the moral aspect of copy'right' and you changed the subject by talking about the legal aspect.

    "I'm discussing the legal aspect. Not the moral one."

    Instead of addressing the points made.

    "Morality is a reflection of the values of society. "

    So first you say you're not discussing the moral aspect, and now you're discussing the moral aspect.

    "Laws should be based off of the benefit to society, not the perceived "moral" value."

    and my point is that copy'right' hurts society more than it benefits it and so we are better off abolishing it. I have given reasons for that. You haven't addressed them and you haven't provided reasons why copy'right' should remain beyond the speculation that less work might be created.

     

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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 6:19pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    (and, even then, I addressed the argument that less work might be created in arguing that any extra work created as a result of such a government imposition is similar to a subsidy. The creation of such work diverts labor resources away from other sectors of the economy which harms those other sectors. It's not really the governments job to determine where labor should be directed. You haven't addressed this point either).

     

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    Nom du Clavier (profile), Apr 9th, 2011 @ 6:34pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Lame

    First the teleportation devices will be too large and need lots of energy, meaning they'll only be stationary. Car manufacturers will pay them no attention.

    All of a sudden there are personal teleportation devices and car manufacturers will be arguing they should be illegal, or at least subject to a tithe to them.

     

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  451.  
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    Nom du Clavier (profile), Apr 9th, 2011 @ 6:34pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Lame

    First the teleportation devices will be too large and need lots of energy, meaning they'll only be stationary. Car manufacturers will pay them no attention.

    All of a sudden there are personal teleportation devices and car manufacturers will be arguing they should be illegal, or at least subject to a tithe to them.

     

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  452.  
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    Kaden (profile), Apr 9th, 2011 @ 6:50pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    Given current unemployment rates, that's about the lamest talking point ever.

     

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    Memyself, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 7:11pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    "We were discussing the moral aspect of copy'right' and you changed the subject by talking about the legal aspect."

    Bullshit. In my very first post I addressed the moral question afterwards I expanded the subject. There's an important distinction between the two that you seem to have completely missed.

    "Instead of addressing the points made."

    Because I already addressed the moral point. Like I said, find one I have ignored.

    "So first you say you're not discussing the moral aspect, and now you're discussing the moral aspect."

    Yes. It is capable to have two concurrent but separate discussion within one thread. And I'm only discussing the morality because people like you keep demanding I address the morality. And my answer to that has been consistent since my first post. Morality is subjective. It changes according to the demands of society, so there is no reasonable way to frame this issue as a moral question.

    "and my point is that copy'right' hurts society more than it benefits it and so we are better off abolishing it. I have given reasons for that. You haven't addressed them and you haven't provided reasons why copy'right' should remain beyond the speculation that less work might be created.Which I believe was Mike's point.

    And what aspect of this have I not addressed? Your simple statement of opinion? Was there more to it than that? Be specific. I fail to see how abolishing copyright is of benefit to society. Reform? Yes. Abolishment? No.

     

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    Memyself, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 7:17pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    "I'm not the one saying that making copies is immoral, you are."

    Where did I ever make that claim?

    "If you want to claim it's immoral..."

    Seriously, where did I ever make that claim. Quote me. I dare you.

    "...if you want to restrict my behavior, then you need to justify it."

    I have already explained that your behavior is not restricted in any significant way that could be alleviated without restricting the options of the seller. You have the right to decline purchasing anything at any time. You are not forced to participate in anything you do not care to participate in. Abolishing copyright removes the choice of how to distribute artists products from the artist.

    Over and over you accuse me of making determinations about your morality. To that I have little to say other than to tell you that you need to work on your reading comprehension. Desperately.

     

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    Memyself, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 7:19pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    Bullshit. You have nothing. Not once have I misrepresented anyone's views. You simply cannot abide that you haven't a point to make a value, so your resort to childish antics. Go away troll.

     

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    Memyself, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 7:20pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    Quote me. Put your money where your mouth is. Go ahead.

     

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    Memyself, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 7:23pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    Just more childish and inane bullshit. Quote me on making accusations to Mike's character. Give examples of me making proclamations to rights without offering up supporting argument for my perspective. Go ahead.

     

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  458.  
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    wvhillbilly (profile), Apr 9th, 2011 @ 8:15pm

    Re: Re: Re: Copyright trolls

    Yes, artists should get reasonable compensation for their work.

    My quarrel is not with copyright itself. My quarrel is with copyright maximalists who want everything for themselves, and nothing for consumers. My quarrel is with corporate entities who want to make everything copyright for ever by way of endless term extensions. My quarrel is with those who have retroactively extended term of copyright on works that otherwise would have gone into the public domain in the 1970s when their copyrights expired, to where they will not expire in our lifetime. My quarrel is with those who want to reclaim copyright on works already in the public domain, and who abuse copyright in other ways. My quarrel is with those who seek multi-million dollar judgments against individuals who have uploaded or downloaded a few songs for others to listen to or for their own enjoyment and who have done little if any damage to those suing them, ruining them for life for an offense that is on the level of an overtime parking violation.

    The original term of copyright, when copyright law first came about, was 14 years, with one extension to 28 years at the author's timely request. At the end of this term the work went into the public domain, and could be used legally by anyone for any purpose. Public domain is important because much of the works of today have been built on top of existing works from the public domain, and have been for all of history. With the term of copyright now life of the author plus 70 years, nothing copyrighted today will go into the public domain in our lifetime, and possibly in the lifetimes of our great great grandchildren. And if congress keeps passing term extensions at the whim of some congressman or corporation or other, there will be no more public domain because everything will be copyright for ever, unless the author himself donates his work to the public domain.

    And we will all be the losers.

     

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    Karl (profile), Apr 9th, 2011 @ 8:40pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    In order to read the rest of this post, you must send me $1. If you quote me, that is another $1. If you attempt to use any of the ideas I present in this post, you owe me another $1. It is up to you to contact me to send me the money you owe me for my labor. By reading further, you're agreeing to these terms and conditions.

    Now, then.

    say he "can't charge you" for something he writes
    Funny, I never said that.


    I must have misunderstood this sentence:
    I already know that you can't charge me for something you write here.

    If you didn't mean he "can't charge you" for something he writes, what do you mean exactly? Andy why not? He morally can't charge you, or he legally can't charge you? Or do you mean he doesn't have the physical ability to charge you? Or something else entirely?

    Trying to maliciously trick or entrap someone is quite often neither legal or moral.

    He put his terms in the first sentence of his post. As did I. There is no trickery involved. Just ask anyone who didn't abide by a EULA that they clicked without reading, or a girl who downloaded an MP3 without any copyright information on it.

    a) you believe it's immoral for him to charge for consuming his content
    I believe nothing of the sort. In fact, I invited him to charge for something, and offer it for sale to me.


    If you're not going to pay me at least $1, then by your own standards, you "think you're entitled to the benefits of having something that you didn't pay for."

    that your actions are not immoral solely because they are within the bounds of the law.
    bankers get paid to legally do things I believe immoral.


    Fair enough, but then what's with this comment?

    I'll tell you what, if you can show that your post makes any sense legally, I'll happily mail you 5 bucks.

    So, there would be nothing immoral about repealing copyright in its entirety?
    As always, 2 + 2 = 5 to Karl.


    I was only going by the moral stance that you presented. Perhaps I misunderstood. I'll ask you flat-out: if Congress were to repeal all copyright laws today (which they have every legal right to do), would that be immoral in any way? Why or why not?

     

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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 8:54pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    "Where did I ever make that claim?"

    So then are you saying there is nothing immoral about making such copies.

    "I have already explained that your behavior is not restricted in any significant way that could be alleviated without restricting the options of the seller."

    Your argument is akin to saying that slavery abolition restricts the options of the slave holder, now he can't own slaves.

    Copy'right' is an imposition, it requires a government to exist. Government impositions that restrict my behavior should serve my interest and the will of those that the law is imposed on. Copy'right' abolition is not a government imposition. As a citizen, it is my will that these laws get abolished. They impose an undue burden on me and the government that upholds them needs to represent its citizens. I'm encouraging other citizens to hold my views and to demand that our government repeal these laws. If the citizens demand these laws be repealed and they get repealed, then there is nothing wrong with me copying as I please being that you don't really believe in any morality outside of law. Lets abolish copy'right' and make freely copying moral.

    "You have the right to decline purchasing anything at any time."

    and I should have a legal right to make copies of what I please at any time as I please. and I encourage others to hold that position and I'm expressing my position to others and to the government in hopes that it will encourage them to consider the will of its constituents when making policy. and if and when these laws are abolished, then you would have no problems with me making copies as I please, because morality is based on law according to you.

    "You are not forced to participate in anything you do not care to participate in."

    I am forced to make the effort to determine what is and what isn't infringement if I want to consume non-infringing content. In many instances, I need to be psychic to know. Copy'right' material displaces permissibly licensed material on public airwaves and so it forces such material off of public airwaves yet I'm forced not to broadcast whatever I please (including permissibly licensed content) on such public airwaves and I am forced not to copy and redistribute the content that is published on such airwaves. These are impositions I could do without.

    The problem here is that you are restricting my rights, you are restricting what I can participate in. Your argument is akin to saying that preventing me from drinking water doesn't force me to participate in anything that I don't want to participate in. Free speech is banned in China, but they're not forced to participate in going to the movies if they don't want to. That misses the point. You're still restricting my rights through a government imposition. Copy'right' abolition restricts no ones rights through a government imposition. I do not want my rights restricted through a government imposition in this manner, I do not want my government telling me that I can't copy as I please. and while I'm not the only member of society and so the government shouldn't represent me alone, the only way that citizens can really get the government to represent them is for us to express their will to the government and to others. and that's what I'm doing. If enough people like me resent copy'right' and resist it and express their opinions against it, it will be abolished. I'm just one of those people expressing my opinion against it. Maybe I'm alone, and if so the government will likely ignore me. Or maybe more people will agree with me. But if I don't express my opinion against it and no one else expresses their opinion against it and everyone is against it, then how can the government know the will of its constituents to implement it? If you wish, you can express your opinion in favor of the law and be represented just as well. You have a vote too. That's called democracy. Unlike the mainstream media, where IP criticisms are systematically filtered out and restricted from being communicated on wrongfully monopolized distribution channels thanks to our corrupt government. That's not democracy, that's tyranny.

    "Abolishing copyright removes the choice of how to distribute artists products from the artist."

    Removing slavery removes the choice of being able to enslave slaves by the slave holder. So what. Artists can find other choices. Other choices exist outside of copy'right'. I don't want my government implementing an artificially created choice.

    Lets give a group of pencil makers a monopoly too. Not doing so removes their choice of being the only pencil makers around. Think of the pencil makers.

     

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    Memyself, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 9:00pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    "In order to read the rest of this post, you must send me $1. If you quote me, that is another $1. If you attempt to use any of the ideas I present in this post, you owe me another $1. It is up to you to contact me to send me the money you owe me for my labor. By reading further, you're agreeing to these terms and conditions."

    This didn't work when the first guy did it. It particularly doesn't work when half of your post is made up of quotes written by someone else.

    There is a reasonable expectation created through years of precedent that posts made on this forum are intended and available to the general public without any prohibition to the use of said material. The same cannot be said for the person who clicks through the EULA or the girl who downloads the mp3.

    Additionally, as it is not your site I don't think you have a clear right to prohibit how the publicly posted material is shared.

    But if you can successfully register a copyright on your post I will concede this point and send you three dollars.

     

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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 9:18pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    "Removing slavery removes the choice of being able to enslave slaves by the slave holder. So what. Artists can find other choices. Other choices exist outside of copy'right'. I don't want my government implementing an artificially created choice."

    Addendum: the government should implement universal health care because not doing so restricts a citizens rights towards getting free health care. No, that wouldn't be a valid argument for universal health care. A valid argument might be, we are all better off with it than without. Not that the government not imposing it restricts our rights to have it. It's not our right to have it and it's no ones right to have the taxpayers fund their healthcare. If it's done it should be done because taxpayers think everyone is better off with it and maybe because taxpayers are philanthropic enough in your time of need, not because you feel that removing such a healthcare program restricts your rights. You have no such right, the government owes you nothing and neither do taxpayers. They do not owe you a monopoly and they do not owe you universal healthcare, to the extent it's implemented it should be for the public good.

    Same thing with welfare and workers compensation. No one is entitled to workers compensation and welfare and artists aren't entitled to a governmental monetary subsidy for their work either. "but the government not handing them money for their work takes away an artists option of getting paid by the government for your work." You're not entitled to such payment by the government or by taxpayers. Just like you're not entitled to a government imposed monopoly and the options that it provides. The people get to decide what the government can provide for you and if the people decide that the government should give you welfare, then it can. If they decide it shouldn't, then it shouldn't. Same thing goes for copy'right'. I do not want my government providing you with copy'rights'. Heck, I'd rather them just give you money for your work than to provide you with copy'rights' and restrict my rights in the process. Maybe I'm alone and maybe not, but just like you and everyone else, I get a voice too. So do you. That's called democracy.

     

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    Memyself, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 9:50pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    "So then are you saying there is nothing immoral about making such copies."

    As I have clearly indicated, morality is subjective. If our society deems piracy immoral, it is. If our society deems murder a moral act, it is. I don't think morality is an issue in this equation at all, which I have stated repeatedly from my first post on this topic onward.

    My personal beliefs lean towards empathy and respect. If someone paints a picture and puts it in a gallery with a sign that says "no photography", I respect that request.

    "Your argument is akin to saying that slavery abolition restricts the options of the slave holder, now he can't own slaves."

    No, because art is not a human being with legal rights. In slave trading there are three parties. The slaver, the slave and the buyer. In the trading of art there are only two parties. It's not like we abolished slavery so that the buyers of slaves wouldn't have to pay.

    "Copy'right' is an imposition, it requires a government to exist."

    So do roads and streetlights and speed limits and emergency medical services and so on. I don't care if government is required in the establishment of something that is arguably beneficial. The only thing that matters is if the issue in question is genuinely beneficial.

    "you don't really believe in any morality outside of law."

    I never said that I believe in no morality outside of law. I said that morality is subjective and determined by society.

    "and I should have a legal right to make copies of what I please at any time as I please"

    What makes your desire to freely copy more important than the desire of the artists to distribute their work as they see fit?

    "The problem here is that you are restricting my rights, you are restricting what I can participate in."

    Is Disneyland restricting your rights by charging admission?

    "Lets give a group of pencil makers a monopoly too. Not doing so removes their choice of being the only pencil makers around. Think of the pencil makers."

    If you don't need a pencil, don't buy one. The pencil makers will go out of business or adapt. That's fine. But forcing the pencil makers to sell according to your specifications? No.

     

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    E. P. Donkeytonshire, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 9:51pm

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    Yes.

     

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    Memyself, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 9:54pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    You've drifted very far off topic. But if we are going to follow this path...

    If we go with the argument that all aspects of rights should be determined by majority rule, where would we be on the various civil rights issues?

     

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    Memyself, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 9:58pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    It also might be a good time to point out to you that the US (as the focus here has been on US copyright) is not a democracy.

     

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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 10:05pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    "But forcing the pencil makers to sell according to your specifications?"

    They're not forced to sell according to my specifications. They can choose not to sell pencils.

     

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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 10:20pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    "Is Disneyland restricting your rights by charging admission?"

    Yes, they are, but are restrictions of rights that I more or less agree with. The restriction that copy'right' imposes on me are restrictions that I do not agree with.

    "What makes your desire to freely copy more important than the desire of the artists to distribute their work as they see fit?"

    No one is preventing them from distributing their work as they see fit. I don't want my government imposing these artificial distribution mechanisms that don't exist outside of government. Aside from that, they can distribute their work as they see fit. The government shouldn't provide for every distribution method that an artists may want. For example an artist may want a distribution method that allows him to distribute their content by forcing me to fund its delivery through the postal service. That's not a distribution method I want them to have. Neither is copy'right'. Outside of government, they can distribute their work how they see fit (so long as it doesn't involve harming someone or damaging property or something like that). I don't want my government giving them copy'right' as an artificial distribution method.

    I don't even have to justify why I believe that copy'right' shouldn't exist to your satisfaction, or at all. As a citizen, I should still have a say in these matters just like any other citizen. and I am expressing my say and perhaps others can express their say and if enough people agree with me maybe we can get our say. That's what democracy is. You get a voice too.

    "So do roads and streetlights and speed limits and emergency medical services and so on."

    and these are impositions that I agree with. Copy'right' is one that I do not agree with.

     

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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 10:22pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    I know, it's more of a plutocracy. Which is partly why I want copy'right' abolished. Same with patents.

     

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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 10:27pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    "If we go with the argument that all aspects of rights should be determined by majority rule, where would we be on the various civil rights issues?"

    You're the one that argues

    "If our society deems piracy immoral, it is. If our society deems murder a moral act, it is."

    By your logic, if society deems piracy a moral act, then it is. Then the law should change to permit piracy. I'm taking your logic to its logical conclusion by stating that I'm a member of society and I deem piracy moral and copy'right' immoral. Now, if enough people agree with me, then by your logic it's true. Why should our legal system pass immoral laws?

     

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    Nicedoggy, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 10:35pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    Please show me where did I say you said anything about Mike, what I said and I quote was:
    I got tired of the cool-aid references, I got tired of the accusations against Mike character that has nothing to do with the issues but keeps coming up every time, I got tired of those of you that keep saying "but...but...my rights" without never putting forth a real good reason why you people should a) have any rights b) need those rights.


    Where in there I said anything about you?
    I though I was clearly explaining my reasons for being tired, apparently not clearly enough though :)

     

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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 10:48pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    and, by your logic, I, as a member of society, decide that copy'right' is immoral. This post is my opinion. Yes, I'm only one member of society and the government shouldn't represent me alone, but for the government to represent its constituents, then its constituents need to communicate its will. As a member, that' what I'm doing. If enough people agree, then copy'right' is immoral and, by our logic, as a society we should abolish it. My opinion, lets abolish it.

     

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    Karl (profile), Apr 9th, 2011 @ 10:49pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    But if you can successfully register a copyright on your post I will concede this point and send you three dollars.

    We're not talking about the law, we're talking about morality.

    Is it moral for me to place those restrictions on my post? Especially to do so unilaterally, and without taking into account any consideration of public use of the material?

    That is, essentially, the question we're all debating here.

    As for my opinion: No, it is not moral. If I'm to be allowed to do such a thing, I must take into account the reasonable expectation of availablity to the general public without any prohibition to the use of said material. The moral decision ultimately rests on whether it maximizes the public good.

     

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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 10:49pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    by your logic *

     

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    Nicedoggy, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 10:57pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    Not even in the thread about the band that said they were pirated 100 thousand times on Bittorrent and you kept insisting the researchers were sloppy?

    When what they did was look where the band said they found the data and found nothing.

    Was that not a misrepresentation of the facts?
    Maybe honest mistake but a miss no less.

     

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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 10:59pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    Remember what you said

    "If our society deems piracy immoral, it is. If our society deems murder a moral act, it is. I don't think morality is an issue in this equation at all, which I have stated repeatedly from my first post on this topic onward."

    (U.S) copy'right' not being a democracy suggests that it's disagreed on by most people. By your very own standards, (U.S) copy'right' is immoral, since society doesn't agree with it. Lets abolish it (or at least change it) so that it's a democracy and agreed on by most so that it can be moral.

     

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    Karl (profile), Apr 9th, 2011 @ 11:00pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    We're not talking about the law, we're talking about morality.

    To be specific: the original poster and I were talking about morality.

    You seem to have a more functional approach, which I actually agree with.

     

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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 11:19pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    Techdirt needs a button that allows me to jump to the post you're responding to in flattened view.

    Actually, his approach isn't all that bad to be honest. He's actually somewhat sensible on the subject and has been very civil in participating in a civilized debate.

    Memyself, it's been nice debating you. Good job on being civil about the debate and being patient and you do bring up some good thoughts to the conversation and add to it. Stick around and keep contributing your ideas.

     

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    Karl (profile), Apr 9th, 2011 @ 11:29pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    Sorry, I know I'm butting in here...

    The only thing that matters is if the issue in question is genuinely beneficial.

    On this, I think most of us agree, amazing as it seems.

    Is Disneyland restricting your rights by charging admission?

    No, but Disneyland could do this without copyright. What copyright allows is Disneyland restricting my right to create another Disneyland, completely at my own expense, whether I charge admission or not.

    This is a pretty critical point, which seems to get lost quite often. Copyright does not grant anyone the ability to create works, and taking it away would not prevent anyone from creating works. The only thing copyright does is allow some people to prevent others from creating works.

    Until that is universally understood and recognized, a sane discussion on the topic is not really possible.

    What makes your desire to freely copy more important than the desire of the artists to distribute their work as they see fit?

    Without copyright, you have both. The artists can distribute their work as they see fit, and everyone else can freely copy. With copyright, you only have one.

    But forcing the pencil makers to sell according to your specifications? No.

    Except that's exactly what copyrights* do: force the pencil makers to sell according to someone else's specifications - the pencil designers.

    Many of us "pencil-makers" have this attitude towards the copyright holders: "The pencil designers will go out of business or adapt. That's fine. But forcing us to sell according to their specifications? No."

    *Yeah, in this case it would actually be patents, but it's just an analogy.

     

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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 11:44pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    If the entire culture in question agreed on this action, then yes. Morality is defined by society. It used to be considered moral to own slaves. It used to be considered moral to burn heretics. In some cultures, it was considered moral to perform ritual sacrifices. Treating women as property was considered the just and moral thing to do.

    Good example. There were even then people who said those things were immoral, and those who didn't (like today's IP supporters). You can add copyright to that list now.

    Copyright is immoral.
    Abolish copyright.

     

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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 11:45pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    "Your defense of innocence is a poor one."

    My defense isn't one of 'innocence', In my hypothetical I'm guilty of making the copy without following your terms that I'm aware of. The point is that, as a third party, I never agreed to the terms, but that doesn't prevent you from making terms with a second party and enforcing legal punishments on that second party for violating his side of the agreement. What copy'right' enables you to do is to punish me, a third party, for violating terms that I never agreed to. You're allowed to set the terms of sale to those who receive the content directly from you without imposing those terms on third parties who simply copy that work. Copy'right' isn't necessary to enable you to set the terms of sale, it's necessary for you to impose sanctions on those who copy your work without agreeing with those terms. But the terms aren't violated by the third party who copied the work because they weren't agreed to by them begin with. Saying that you can set the terms on someone who never agreed to those terms is similar to saying I can set the terms on the air you breath. You're breathing the air without paying me, you're aware of my terms, you violated my terms. So what? Copy'right' isn't needed to set the terms of sale, but making a copy isn't a sale. Forcing someone who never agreed to a term not to copy something may technically be a term that they violated, but it's not a term that they ever agreed to. The law doesn't need to enforce your terms on those who don't agree to them and end up getting a copy of that work anyways in order to allow you to set the terms on those who you do sell the work directly to. You can sell the work to my friend under whatever terms, if he doesn't like it, he doesn't have to buy. If he does buy and violates those terms by giving me a copy, then your problem is with him, not me. I never agreed to those terms. I may have technically violated them, but you violated my don't breath air without paying me terms. That's irrelevant, you never agreed to such terms. Just like I never agreed to your don't copy your work without paying you terms. Me violating such terms doesn't prevent you from setting terms with those who get copies directly from you.

     

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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 11:51pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    It's like if you tell my friend a secret under the condition that he not tell anyone else. My friend agrees. Now, say my friend tells me but he tells me that you told him the secret under the condition that my friend not tell anyone else. My friend who told me the secret never set any such condition on me, in fact, he wants to tell me because he's telling everyone else as well, he wants the secret to spread. I tell everyone, the secret spreads. Your problem isn't with me, it's with my friend. He broke his end of the agreement, I broke no agreement because I never agreed to anything. Copy'right' punishes me for breaking an agreement that I never agreed to. The agreement wasn't between me and you, it was between my friend and you.

     

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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 11:55pm

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    Last I checked, you were not the arbiter on what can and cannot be discussed.

    He didn't claim to be, either. What's more, he can point out when you're trying to change the subject too, whether you like it or not.

    You have no morals outside societal conditioning. You might think otherwise. But you're wrong.

    Funny. That is, itself, a perfect example of a morally bankrupt argument. I've noticed that those with no morals tend to like to pretend that morals are whatever they want them to be.

     

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  484.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 9th, 2011 @ 11:58pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    Your argument seems to be (and please correct me if I ma mistaken) that the way people sell products of their own labor should be dictated by you (and those you represent).

    OK, you're wrong. That's what happens when you make stuff up.

     

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  485.  
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    IP-tard, Apr 10th, 2011 @ 12:05am

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    This is completely false. Music publishers were offering sheet music, for sale, long before copyright existed. Likewise, there were privately funded opera houses and theaters that were open to the public. Look at the biography of Handel if you don't believe me.

    Nuh-uhh! I have my fingers in my ears! I can't hear you!

     

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  486.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 10th, 2011 @ 12:08am

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    "Why should every artists be required to sell according to your rules?"

    The artist isn't being required to do anything. If the artist doesn't like the terms offered, then the artist doesn't have to sell.

    and copy'right' doesn't have to exist to enable an artist to make various terms. The artist can set terms of the release of the first copy (ie: price), charge what s/he wants, and groups that enjoy the artists work can pitch in their money (each member contributing a small fee) to acquire the initial copy of the work. It's more of a negotiation, the artist sets the terms of the initial sale and if the buyer(s) agree, they buy. If not, they don't. Both parties set the terms.

    If someone buys a hammer from me, what they do with that hammer afterwords (ie: make copies of it and give copies to their friend) is their business. I sell the original hammer at whatever price I deem fair. Others can then put that hammer in a museum if it's considered a work of art. Maybe the value of the hammer maybe partly determined by how much the owner can get by placing it in his/her museum or maybe selling initial copies of it. If the hammer is valuable, then the initial owner who paid a lot for it may perceives that s/he will find ways of making back his/her money and maybe a profit. Will s/he? Maybe, maybe not, it's a gable. The risk was considered as part of the initial price. But if the hammer is valuable, then people will pay the original creator a lot for it.

    These anti copy laws don't apply to hammers. The seller doesn't get to use these laws to prevent the hammer from being copied by others. but the hammer seller isn't required to sell the hammer under the buyers conditions. He can choose not to sell. Or both of them can negotiate conditions of sale without copy'right'. but why should artists get special copy'right' laws and not hammer makers. Hammer makers should protest, they should get these rights too.

     

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  487.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 10th, 2011 @ 12:12am

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    Try telling your friends that you don't think they should be able to prevent a rival band copying their work and passing it off as their own? See how they'll react to that, because that's what "no copyrights" means.

    Um, no, copyright isn't about such fraud at all and it is dishonest to claim it is. Congratulations on exposing yourself and losing any credibility you may have had. I'm not even going to bother with the rest of your comment.

     

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  488.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 10th, 2011 @ 12:24am

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Genius

    If I recall correctly, that's only if you modify it. I could be wrong but that's the way I remember it.

    You are correct. Red Hat's trademark only prevents you from making your own distribution and passing it off as Red Hat. It does not keep you from passing on unmodified copies (as claimed above) as Red Hat if they are genuine.

     

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  489.  
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    The eejit (profile), Apr 10th, 2011 @ 12:32am

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    I'm a psychopath. Right tree, wrong diagnosis. Now I'll have to murderise you. /s

     

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  490.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 10th, 2011 @ 12:33am

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Genius

    Source: Red Hat Enterprise Agreement

    Red Hat does not write, and their user agreements are not, the law. Quoting their self-written agreement as "the law" is a mistake.

     

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  491.  
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    The eejit (profile), Apr 10th, 2011 @ 12:38am

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Genius

    It's legally binding, apparently. so yes, it is 'the law'.

     

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  492.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 10th, 2011 @ 12:47am

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Genius

    This is what CentOS and other distributions have to do.

    That is because they are distributing a different product, not actual RHEL. Calling their product RHEL would indeed violate trademark law. Understand?

    This is that law.

    Except "that law" doesn't say what you claimed. Nice try.

    If you still refuse to believe any of this, you might want to head over and update the Wikipedia entry for RHEL to correct the following statement, which you assert is wrong:

    While trademark restrictions prevent free re-distribution of officially supported versions of Red Hat Enterprise Linux, compliance with open source licenses requires Red Hat to freely provide the source code for the distribution's software.


    You don't seem to know how to use Wikipedia. Just being written there doesn't make something true. You need to check the source. In this case, that statement is based on another statement by a person named Eric S. Raymond. Raymond is a famous computer programmer, but that doesn't make him a lawyer or a good source of legal information.

     

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  493.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 10th, 2011 @ 12:50am

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    Besides, IP maximists keep on complaining about the piracy rate. If so many people so strongly believed in these laws, why are they so worried about the piracy rates?

    Good point.

     

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  494.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 10th, 2011 @ 12:56am

    Re: Re:

    When I paid Ford Motor Credit $22,000 I assumed that somewhere in that price was a little something for the man or woman who 'created' my Mustang. Same with my house and my furniture.

    You assumed wrong. Auto workers don't get residuals. And every time those things are resold in the future, they won't get a cut of those sales either. But to be fair, if we're going to give authors copyrights, then we should probably give everyone else rights in anything they help create, like your Ford.

     

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  495.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 10th, 2011 @ 12:59am

    Re: Re:

    You pay back your parents by raising your own children. quid pro quo.

    By passing it on? That sounds a lot like file sharing, to me.

     

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  496.  
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    The eejit (profile), Apr 10th, 2011 @ 1:00am

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Copyright trolls

    So when I went out and tried to find a legal copy of The Wizard of Oz (which SHOULD BE A PUBLIC DOMAIN WORK, by the way)to download, I can't. Because the copyright is still in effect, because the corporation still exists.

    So when that corporation disappears, no-one will be able to use it for 70 years. That makes no goddamned sense whatsoever.

     

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  497.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 10th, 2011 @ 1:01am

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Copyright trolls

    Hating copyright in the abstract is not a productive position.

    Agreed. Hating it in the abstract is not enough. Active steps need to be taken to eliminate it.

    Abolish copyright.

     

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  498.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 10th, 2011 @ 1:02am

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    The point is that, as a third party, I never agreed to the terms, but that doesn't prevent you from making terms with a second party and enforcing legal punishments on that second party for violating his side of the agreement.

    So you support and encourage the punishment of those that buy a CD, rip it and then upload it?

    Copy'right' isn't necessary to enable you to set the terms of sale, it's necessary for you to impose sanctions on those who copy your work without agreeing with those terms.

    Yes, it is indeed that. So what's the problem?

    Society has decided to help those who create and have given them a way to recoup the time and money invested in their creation. Not just one government, but society as a whole, as copyright is used world-wide.

    If a musician sold one album, and then every other consumer simply copied that one, it would not be possible to recoup the time and money invested in its creation. The US wished "to promote the progress of science and useful arts" and as a result, creators have a way to spend their time creating, rather than mopping floors.

    And it seems the public agrees that music is indeed very important, as the vast majority consume it every day.

    Saying that you can set the terms on someone who never agreed to those terms is similar to saying I can set the terms on the air you breath.

    You agree to the terms when you choose to live in a nation that has copyright laws.

    You can disagree with laws, but until they're changed you can't disobey them with the excuse that you don't like them.

    Ask tax protesters.

    So it seems to me that willful ignorance is necessary to your mantra of 'I never agreed to those terms'. If someone is smart enough to use a computer and P2P software, they're smart enough to find out what's legal and what isn't. It's not difficult in the least. And you know it.

     

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  499.  
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    The eejit (profile), Apr 10th, 2011 @ 1:05am

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    Okay then, what was your royalty percentage for a typical per-broadcast agreement? I'm genuinely curious.

     

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  500.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 10th, 2011 @ 1:11am

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Copyright trolls

    It's all a smokescreen to try and evade the fact that they mainly just think they should be able to avail themselves to someone else's labor without paying for it.

    A lot of labor has been put into building Techdirt. How much did you pay to use it?

    Hypocrite.

    Abolish copyright.

     

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  501.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 10th, 2011 @ 1:18am

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    Ever hear of war? How about human sacrifice? How about burning people at the stake for being heretics? How about the Crusades? How about execution? Historically speaking, the killing of others has been considered a moral act on many occasions. I should not need to explain this basic fact to you.

    This will apparently come as a shock to you, but many people *do* actually find those things to be immoral. Maybe not you and your type, but others.

     

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  502.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 10th, 2011 @ 1:21am

    Re: Re: Re:

    the flute player who plays his flute on the streets in hopes that people who enjoy his music will put money in his can also expects compensation for his labor.

    Did someone solicit him to do that in order to consume his music? No. How could he expect payment then? He couldn't, and doesn't.

    The rest of your post becomes irrelevant because of that fact.

     

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  503.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 10th, 2011 @ 1:25am

    Re: Re: Re: Re:

    This is so beyond silly that it is literally shocking. You have an MBA and you post stuff like this.

    The cost of a hammer includes the entire cost of production plus profit. And if you wanted to make a copy of it, that cost is also already covered, minus your labor.

    So here's an idea: You like music but don't want to pay for it? Go make your own.

    Problem solved. I hope you have hours of listening pleasure with your creations.

     

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  504.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 10th, 2011 @ 1:32am

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    I have already explained that your behavior is not restricted in any significant way that could be alleviated without restricting the options of the seller.

    The "options of the seller" to restrict your freedom, eh? That is, indeed, a significant restriction.

    You have the right to decline purchasing anything at any time.

    And you have the right to decline selling. But once you do, you should have no future control over the buyer.

    You are not forced to participate in anything you do not care to participate in.

    Now you're really piling it on. No force? Really? Why do you think it's called law "enforcement"? Because it is by FORCE. And copyright is in turn a government granted monopoly backed by FORCE.

     

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  505.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 10th, 2011 @ 1:38am

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    Yes. It is capable to have two concurrent but separate discussion within one thread.

    And conveniently conflate them too, huh?

    And I'm only discussing the morality because people like you keep demanding I address the morality.

    The real reason you should be discussing the morality is because that was the topic of the article. Or did you not bother to read it?

     

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  506.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 10th, 2011 @ 1:40am

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    This didn't work when the first guy did it. It particularly doesn't work when half of your post is made up of quotes written by someone else.

    You sound like some kind of freetard.

     

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  507.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 10th, 2011 @ 1:43am

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    There is a reasonable expectation created through years of precedent that posts made on this forum are intended and available to the general public without any prohibition to the use of said material.

    He put a specific license on his creation. You think think it's "reasonable" to ignore licenses when it suits *you*? Yeah, I see how that works.

    The same cannot be said for the person who clicks through the EULA or the girl who downloads the mp3.

    Oh, because you're so much more special than they are, huh?

     

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  508.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 10th, 2011 @ 1:46am

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Copyright trolls

    Yes, I would love it if my favorite song was interrupted every 15 seconds with an advertisement. That's definitely the way to roll, and I'm sure what the writers of the Constitution had in mind when they wanted to promote progress of the arts...

     

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  509.  
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    Anonymous, Apr 10th, 2011 @ 1:49am

    Too many posts...but...

    ...Something that almost never seems to come up is tbe absurdity of charging for individual use of an unlimitable product. (Hopw that's a word)

    Now, this only applies to things of a digital nature or things which can be reproduced/distributed via digital means, but within those limitations, how can one justify charging or attempting to control something that is unlimited?

    An artist writes a song, produces a video, something like that and releases it. Once it's released, the number of 'copies' does absolutely nothing but multiply geometrically ad infinitum. At no point in our future, (barring complete planetary destruction or something similar) will there ever be a day where there are no existing copies of Welcome to the Jungle. How can you try and control that? How can you lay claim to something as uncontrollable and uncontainable as air? The fact is, it doesn't matter who deserves what, or what is 'moral' and what isn't. Copyright law literally tries to do the absolute impossible, by trying to control how someone utilizes an infinitely copyable product.

    You can banter back and forth all day about what's the moral thing to do, what's right and what's wrong, who deserves and doesn't deserve what. But at the end of the day, copyright law is like trying to tax breathing...and it is unsustainable. The free distribution of media of all forms is an inevitable force of nature. People can either embrace it, they can simply adapt to it, or they can rail against it, but it's not going to stop.

     

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  510.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 10th, 2011 @ 1:56am

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Copyright trolls

    LOL

    The government had to step in for the same reason they usually step in: to protect society.

    People rip off music because at the moment it's easy and they figure they can get away with it.

    That's all it has ever been about and everyone knows it.

    All this copyright bs is just to muddy the waters and try to rationalize douchebag behavior.

     

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  511.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 10th, 2011 @ 1:57am

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    As I have clearly indicated, morality is subjective.

    Yes, I know many people think that morality is "subject" to be what they want it to be. Some people belong to social groups (gangs, etc.) that define morality in terms that most benefit themselves. These people may then define murder, rape and such things as perfectly moral in their minds. Kind of like what IP supporters do with copyright.

    Is Disneyland restricting your rights by charging admission?

    Do gangsters restrict your rights by charging protection fees?

    If you don't need a pencil, don't buy one.

    But whatever you do, don't make your own! Because that would be stealing!
    /s

     

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  512.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 10th, 2011 @ 2:05am

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    So now you're saying that even using non-copyrighted, public-domain stuff without making a "payment"

    No, I'm still answering replies to my original post about taking something offered for sale without paying.

    So sad Mike, that you must twist things to to try and further your agenda.

     

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  513.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 10th, 2011 @ 2:13am

    Protip:

    sell
    1   /sɛl/ [sel] Show IPA verb, sold, sell·ing, noun
    –verb (used with object)
    1.
    to transfer (goods) to or render (services) for another in exchange for money; dispose of to a purchaser for a price: He sold the car to me for $1000.


    dis·pose/disˈpōz/Verb
    1. Get rid of by throwing away or giving or selling to someone else.

    Notice, nothing in either of those two definitions includes lasting restrictions on the usage of an item.

    Part of the argument is that once you sell a product to someone you lose your rights to that product. Anything less is not a sale, it is a lease, or a rental or a usage agreement or a loan...there are a LOT of words that describe a transaction with long-standing terms...sale isn't one of them. As long as they continue to -sell- music, many of us will continue to do with -our property- as we please.

     

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  514.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 10th, 2011 @ 2:19am

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    He's pointing out how delusional freetards are for thinking anyone is buying the bs that it's long term copyright that they're really upset about.

    Everybody knows you're addicted to content, resent that you are and that you have to rip people off to feed your addiction like an alley crack bum.

    You also resent the fact that creators live a much more exciting life than you could ever dream of having. You're all very sad, pathetic creatures.

     

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  515.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 10th, 2011 @ 2:22am

    Re: Re:

    Please post the address of the person that created the sun and air. While he didn't ask for payment up front, I'm happy to donate.

     

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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 10th, 2011 @ 2:33am

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    This is where you continually need to be reminded to stay in the shallow end of the pool, Mike. You're not an artist, but feel you're an expert nonetheless.

    Even if some won't create art without these laws, I'm fine with that, they can find other ways to contribute to the economy by finding other jobs instead.

    Spoken like a true enemy of the arts.

    Good thing the Constitution protects us and provides for a way "to promote the progress of the arts"...

     

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    Memyself, Apr 10th, 2011 @ 2:45am

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    "On this, I think most of us agree, amazing as it seems.

    Nice, isn't it?

    "No, but Disneyland could do this without copyright. What copyright allows is Disneyland restricting my right to create another Disneyland, completely at my own expense, whether I charge admission or not."

    Yes, but this is the problem with long dialogs and analogies. The point is that sellers can currently operate with or without copyright. Choosing to price themselves out of business is a choice they should be allowed to make. And if they make that choice, they're not restricting your rights. The reason this is the case is because you are not obligated to participate.

    Taking the choice out of the hands of the artists makes little sense to me. Reforming copyright law, sure. But abolishment is excessive.

    "Without copyright, you have both. The artists can distribute their work as they see fit, and everyone else can freely copy. With copyright, you only have one."

    No, because without copyright artists lose the legal ability to decide how and when their work is disseminated and reproduced.

    "Except that's exactly what copyrights* do: force the pencil makers to sell according to someone else's specifications - the pencil designers."

    They're free to design their own pencils. In the analogy you're quoting, consumers are still consumers - the purchasers of pencils. Not the pencil makers. Regardless, the point remains - while no one is required to keep any business in business, no outside party one should have the ability to "decide" how to keep said business in business.

    If artists want to price themselves out of the market, that is their choice. Right now, work can be protected by copyright or it can be distributed freely. It's a choice made by the creator. Take away that choice and you have less options - not more.

    If the market will truly only support free distribution minus copyright protection, it will correct itself.

     

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  518.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 10th, 2011 @ 2:51am

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    Great, that works for them and you. Perhaps others choose to do things differently.

    Why are you anti-choice, Mike?

    Besides making you pay for content, what is so fucking horrible about copyright, hmmm?

     

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  519.  
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    Memyself, Apr 10th, 2011 @ 2:52am

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    And if you can legitimately claim ignorance, then maybe you can mount a credible defense. That said - ignorance of the law is only a defense to a point. If you engage in unlawful behavior and get arrested for it... well you can give the ignorance plea a shot.

    Regardless, most people are well aware that copyright violation is not legal. And by procuring something by circumventing payment that is under copyright protection you are no longer a third party. You are a direct participant. It doesn't matter if you're not the original customer if you still know the terms and you ignore them anyway.

     

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    Memyself, Apr 10th, 2011 @ 2:55am

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    "Funny. That is, itself, a perfect example of a morally bankrupt argument. I've noticed that those with no morals tend to like to pretend that morals are whatever they want them to be.

    Morality is fluid. You can try to turn that fact into an insult all you like. It won't be any less factual.

    The fact that morality is fluid is exactly why the morality argument has little place in the discussion of copyright.

     

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  521.  
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    Memyself, Apr 10th, 2011 @ 2:57am

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    It seems to be exactly what you are saying. If it's not, you could have clarified. It's a dialog, and in a dialog most adults try to reach an understanding. The fact that you failed to clarify and instead chose to insult says quite a bit about you.

     

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    Memyself, Apr 10th, 2011 @ 3:02am

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    It may shock you, but the point was that the cultures who practiced these things did not necessarily consider them immoral at the time. How we view things now and how much things have changed was very much the point.

    That's why I clearly stated "historically speaking".

    Maybe "your type" of person has difficulty with context?

     

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  523.  
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    Memyself, Apr 10th, 2011 @ 3:06am

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    "The "options of the seller" to restrict your freedom, eh? That is, indeed, a significant restriction."

    As I have already pointed out, that is akin to claiming that Disneyland has restricted your freedoms because they don;t let you in for free. Or that a car company has restricted your freedoms because they charge more than you want to pay.

    As a customer you are completely free. Free to refuse to purchase any product you do not want.

    "Now you're really piling it on. No force? Really? Why do you think it's called law "enforcement"? Because it is by FORCE. And copyright is in turn a government granted monopoly backed by FORCE."

    For fucks sake. Seriously? Try that again but spice it up with a little bit of context and reading comprehension please.

     

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  524.  
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    Memyself, Apr 10th, 2011 @ 3:09am

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    "The real reason you should be discussing the morality is because that was the topic of the article. Or did you not bother to read it?"

    That's funny considering how ignorant your response to me is. I have been discussing the topic of the article from my first post onwards. The point of the article, as I understood it, is that morality has no place in these matters. I acknowledged that fact with my very first post. You claim I'm conflating topics when you don't even understand what the topic really is...

     

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    Memyself, Apr 10th, 2011 @ 3:11am

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    The license has to be valid. I don't see how this one is at all. The person in question is not the site owner and the site is clearly used for the free exchange of ideas. That is the precedent in question. Now, you can either address these facts or you cannot. From your inarticulate response, I'm guessing not.

     

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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 10th, 2011 @ 3:13am

    Re: Held for Review

    yeah, as long as you're espousing Soviet views on the arts, might as well incorporate their take on free speech as well...

    What a ginormous dildo you are.

     

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    Memyself, Apr 10th, 2011 @ 3:14am

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    And going to war with Iraq. And abortion. And many other things that some cultures hold immoral and other cultures would not hold immoral. Morality is subjective. Either you can grasp this very simple fact or you cannot. I'm guessing you can't.

     

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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 10th, 2011 @ 3:19am

    Re: Re: Re: Copyright trolls

    No, the rest admitted guilt and settled.

    It took some world-class sociopaths like Thomas and Tenenbaum to get these cases into court.

     

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    vivaelamor (profile), Apr 10th, 2011 @ 4:14am

    Re: Re:

    "Check out John Locke."

    Adapated from a previous comment of mine:

    If you're going to base things on Locke then I should point out first that much of his work was reliant on his interpretation of the bible and that I'm not religious.

    Under the Lockean definition of property I would argue that the rights are already fulfilled by physical property rights. This is backed up by the fact that he did not define anything approaching intellectual property in his treatise. Locke refers to a right to the fruits of one's labour, which is sufficiently afforded by ownership of physical property.

    If anything, intellectual property impedes on the Lockean idea of property rights. In his Second Treatise Of Government, Locke states: "every man has a property in his own person: this no body has any right to but himself. The labour of his body, and the work of his hands, we may say, are properly his". As you copy someone their idea also becomes part of you, no less part of you than if you had come up with an idea yourself. Should you labour to create a physical manifestation of that copy then Locke's philosophy would let you claim that as your property.

     

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    Togashi (profile), Apr 10th, 2011 @ 4:22am

    Re: Re: Re:

    The sentences in italics are the assumptions I take issue with. It is exactly because people are not rational that this would not save money.

     

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    vivaelamor (profile), Apr 10th, 2011 @ 4:58am

    Re: Re:

    "What forms of violence (if any) should be allowed in society? For instance, if a white guy calls a black guy the n-word, and the black guy punches the white guy in the mouth, is that justified? Should it be legal? If not, should his assault charges be reduced?"

    They key thing many people miss when thinking about whether it is OK to be violent is the bias that creates in society. I'm a young, fit male with years of martial arts training yet I'm still only about 130lbs, which puts me at a natural disadvantage when it comes to violence. The two biggest natural biases when it comes to violence are probably age and gender. If nothing else, when condoning violence, you're marginalising half the population for being female.

    So, my opinion is that violence as a reaction to someone being verbally offensive is never justified. (completely off topic, but it looks like I missed the party anyway)

    "Whatever those laws are, they must be written to maximize the public good."

    There's a phrase to be careful of. If you have a law that is good for the vast majority of the public at the expense of a few then you could still argue that it 'maximises the public good'. That is actually on topic because one thing I consider when thinking about copyright law is that however measurably 'good' something may be, it can still be at the cost of something immeasurable. In terms of copyright, you could have a system set up to measurably increase the amount of creativity at no expense of quality and yet still stop some creativity that would have happened otherwise. By the nature of copyright, it is likely that the increased creativity would be motivated by profit whereas the lost creativity may have been pure artistic whim.

    Do we want creativity to just be an economic consideration? Or should it be about freedom for people to express themselves?

     

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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 10th, 2011 @ 5:01am

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Copyright trolls

    You forgot the ones which were dropped by the plaintiffs.

    The main reason we only see the less weak cases is because the weaker cases were dropped by the plaintiffs (or never filled), if they failed to pressure the defendant into settling (or paying without going to the courts).

     

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    Chris in Utah (profile), Apr 10th, 2011 @ 5:43am

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    The Heathens say it best you have your gods and we have ours.

     

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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 10th, 2011 @ 5:53am

    You are all wrong.

     

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    Chris in Utah (profile), Apr 10th, 2011 @ 6:14am

    Had an apifiny this morning

    Somewhere in this field of dreams someone said make your own music! Listen to that, problem solved.

    So do you think adding a short ditty on my tin whistle to all my music will enable me when brought to court for "piracy" and defending myself by questioning is it a courts purview to deem what is and isn't art.

    Side tracked here so many times, thought I will contribute.

     

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    PaulT (profile), Apr 10th, 2011 @ 6:27am

    Re:

    "But don't think you're entitled to the benefits of having something that you didn't pay for."

    I find it extremely amusing that you choose the internet to spout your stupidity in this area. Decrying "freeloaders" on a platform that owes its very existence to multiple acts of "freeloading", and its success to even more such acts. Yet, you're happily using this while claiming that art itself is dependent on restrictive contracts and paid rentals. Your own arguments contradict themselves, and your actions contradict even those arguments that are consistant.

    I also see your moronic comments later on down, somehow attacking Red Hat for managing to make money from a "free" product while displaying a total misunderstanding of what the GPL actually is.

    Your reading comprehension is also rather suspect, being that you responded to an article about the fallacy of moral arguments by presenting... a moral argument - one that is so simplified and irrelevant that it would amaze me if it weren't your typical M.O.

    Your ignorance and arrogance are astounding. If only you took the time you waste on here educating yourself on simple facts and conversational manners, you would actually learn something. Instead, you choose to display your ignorance to the entire planet. Pathetic.

     

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    Jay (profile), Apr 10th, 2011 @ 7:24am

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Copyright trolls

    You're oversimplifying.

    They did not win every case, and had to settle a number of them when, in court, it was proven that they over stepped.

     

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    Jay (profile), Apr 10th, 2011 @ 7:32am

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    The answer is to look right in front of you at what people are doing in the name of copyright!

    Copyright is used to censor
    Copyright is used to limit choices for consumers
    Copyright is used to stagnate the market
    Copyright is used to limit payment for certain goods
    Copyright is used to limit negotiations in contracts

    The cons outweigh the pros and either need a true rethinking, or they need to be abolished.

     

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    Jay (profile), Apr 10th, 2011 @ 7:39am

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    "Techdirt needs a button that allows me to jump to the post you're responding to in flattened view."

    It does the "view in chronology/thread" button

     

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    JezuitX, Apr 10th, 2011 @ 7:41am

    Get off the ivory tower...

    I will give you that the copyright system as we know it is completely fucked, and needs to be fixed. That said to say we just don't need it is ridiculous. If I spend time and energy writing or creating something then release it only to have someone steal it from me is a big problem.

    We all know that with current technology you can scan a book and get it on the internet in a day and some change. If a videogame is released chances are it might be online before it's release date. The key thing is that with copyright that shit is illegal and pushed into the shadows of the internet or what not. If you take away copyright law you could very well have big companies like Walmart grabbing a best seller, scanning it, and selling it for a pittance without giving the author anything. Same thing with CDs, games, and the like.

    Yeah I know what you're saying now. That's great, shit's cheaper, it's good for the consumer, and a million other platitudes. But, wait now you've got a producer who now has been shafted even worse than what piracy could do.

    Hell with piracy you at least have a chance that someone might "like it and buy it". Now even if someone does "like it and buy it" there'd be a pretty damn good chance they're not buying it from the producer. So now guess what...producers dry up. People don't live in ivory towers where they can make music, video games, literature, and what not for funsies or purely intellectual pursuits. They do it to make money...at least enough to live on.

     

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    ictus75, Apr 10th, 2011 @ 8:05am

    Well, after reading this blog, I get what the author means. He was able to do half the work writing this, because he copied most of someone else's blog for his. Yes, he quoted and pointed to the original with a link, but still, he didn't have to write much at all: the author wrote 277 words and copied 239 words! Copy & paste is such a wonderful thing in the digital age. Apparently nobody deserves anything!

     

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    Rose M. Welch (profile), Apr 10th, 2011 @ 8:43am

    Re: Re: Re:

    I can't explain it, but the companies that have patented genes sure can.

     

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    Rose M. Welch (profile), Apr 10th, 2011 @ 8:44am

    Re: Re: Re:

    They are harassing people that break the license that came with that purchase...

    License with purchase? Either you licensed it's use or you purchased it, not both. Those terms are mutually exclusive.

     

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    Chris Rhodes (profile), Apr 10th, 2011 @ 8:49am

    Re:

    But don't think you're entitled to the benefits of having something that you didn't pay for.

    That's a rather blanket statement that doesn't really hold up under scrutiny.

    1. I find air a very beneficial resource, but I generally don't pay anyone for the privilege of breathing.

    2. As the article points out, our current technological works are based on thousands of years of progress that you reap the benefit of, but that you don't pay for. On behalf of all the great-great-great-great-great-great-great-great-great-great-great-great-great grandchildren of Zog the Caveman you don't pay royalties to, you're welcome.

    3. I am not "entitled" to any work you create. That is, to say, I cannot force you to give me a copy of a particular work, if you were to choose to not release it (for example). Nor do I have a right to demand that any given person on the internet send me a copy of the work. However, if you (or someone on the internet) choose to give me a copy of that work, I will accept it graciously. That is not the same thing as feeling "entitled" to receive it.

     

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    Chris Rhodes (profile), Apr 10th, 2011 @ 8:54am

    Re:

    Are you saying you think it's ok to take something that is for sale without paying and without permission?

    Absolutely not. If you offer an eBook on your website for sale and I hack into your server and copy it off, that would be morally wrong. Likewise, if I agreed to buy your eBook for a certain price, received the eBook, and then didn't pay you, that would morally wrong.

    However, if someone else on the internet is willing to send that same eBook to me for free, and I accept, there is nothing morally wrong with that transaction. I didn't steal from you (the bandwidth in the first case), trespass on your property (your server, in the first case), nor violate a contractual agreement (the second case).

     

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    The eejit (profile), Apr 10th, 2011 @ 9:37am

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    Again, childhood is offered without payment, and children can, in theory, be sold. Therefore being a child, by your own logic, is taking something offered for sale without paying

     

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    The eejit (profile), Apr 10th, 2011 @ 9:44am

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    Says the guy who failed in his music business.

     

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