DailyDirt: More Commercial Spaceships On The Way

from the urls-we-dig-up dept

The end of the space shuttle program is coming up pretty soon, but there are still a few plans to keep humans flying in space. It's actually quite interesting to see commercial space programs getting off the ground, but just getting to the edge of the Earth's atmosphere (or a little bit beyond) isn't that awe-inspiring anymore. Nevertheless, commercial ventures are trying to pick up the slack in space exploration, and here are a few links on just some of the projects ahead. By the way, StumbleUpon can also recommend some good Techdirt articles, too.


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    Rose M. Welch (profile), Feb 17th, 2011 @ 4:24pm

    It's actually quite interesting to see commercial space programs getting off the ground...

    D.D. Harriman, where are you?

     

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    Jack, Feb 17th, 2011 @ 11:12pm

    space shuttle safety record

    I'm not sure it's entirely fair to say the space shuttles "don't exactly have the best safety record". There have been two catastrophic losses in over 130 launches. Given the nature of space travel technology in general, and given how few flights we have relative to air travel, I think the safety record is consistent with the state of development of space travel technology.

     

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      Michael Ho (profile), Feb 18th, 2011 @ 1:06am

      Re: space shuttle safety record

      Hmm. The Soyuz manned space missions probably have the best safety record -- beating the shuttle by quite a bit. Not sure what other manned space program to compare the shuttle to that would make the shuttle look better...?

       

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        Jack, Feb 18th, 2011 @ 6:12am

        Re: Re: space shuttle safety record

        How many losses had the Soyuz had after 130 launches? If I recall correctly, after accounting for those hidden by the Soviets, it was more than two.

        In addition, the capabilities of a Soyuz are significantly lower than a shuttle. With increased capability comes increased complexity and increased risk.

        It's a trade-off, and I think if we're serious about space exploration, we have to accept that there will be failures that involve loss of life.

         

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    Pixelation, Feb 18th, 2011 @ 4:24am

    44,500lbs? Note to self, find out how much the house weighs.

     

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