DailyDirt: Scams To Get Rich Quick

from the urls-we-dig-up dept

There are all kinds of ways to make a little bit of extra cash -- and some methods are more unsavory than others. Maybe you think you can convince a bunch of people to join your new multi-level marketing scheme. Or maybe you think you've outsmarted an insurance company with your own (better!) actuarial formula. Here are a few stories on the topic of making some easy money, as long as you don't mind being a bit of a sleazeball. If you'd like to read more awesome and interesting stuff, check out this unrelated (but not entirely random!) Techdirt post via StumbleUpon.


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  1.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Aug 13th, 2013 @ 5:13pm

    Oh my, who could have EVER guessed that Florida would be involved in a scheme to blackmail people with a criminal record for a profit?

    Surely NO ONE saw this coming after electing a governor who's medical company got the US's largest ever fine for Medicare fraud!

    A real shame that there's no civil mugshots of him for his civil law breaking, then maybe he'd feel differently about mugshots on the web.

     

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    Rekrul, Aug 13th, 2013 @ 6:48pm

    Man alters credit card contract

    If the bank signed his altered contract without reading it, I don't see how they have a leg to stand on. "I didn't read the fine print" doesn't work for people who sign the standard contract and then get hit with hidden fees, so why would it be accepted if a bank does the exact same thing. I don't see how it's "fraud" to alter a contract and then mail it back. If they didn't like the terms, they shouldn't have signed it. Isn't that what they tell customers?

     

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    PopeRatzo (profile), Aug 13th, 2013 @ 7:18pm

    Re: Man alters credit card contract

    Banks have lobbyists. You do not. That's why "reading the fine print" is a standard you are held to, but oh my, you can't expect the poor bank to do that.

    If you want to see the "read the fine print" scam by banks writ large, just read some of the stories at nakedcapitalism.com about the mortgage scandal. Banks paid a billion dollar fine because they had 100X that amount invested in mortgages for which they did not have the paperwork to even establish who owns the property. So, they just typed up whatever they damn well pleased and expected the courts to enforce them. Often, they weren't even the party holding the mortgage, but they still foreclosed. Tens of thousands of times. Part of the fine is that they get to keep it out of the media.

     

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    PopeRatzo (profile), Aug 13th, 2013 @ 7:20pm

    Re:

    Not only that, but the governor in question looks like an insane serial killer.

    This is what happens when you let people who are too old to remember what they had for breakfast vote.

     

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    Andrew Lee (profile), Aug 13th, 2013 @ 7:35pm

    one word

    Prenda

     

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  6.  
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    JustSomeComedian, Aug 14th, 2013 @ 5:44am

    Boone Pickens??

    So Billionaire oilman T. Boone Pickens, surely he should be referred to as rich Pickens.

    Boom boom, thank you, you've been a fabulous audience, I'm here all week :-)

     

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  7.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Aug 14th, 2013 @ 6:37am

    Re: Man alters credit card contract

    It should be noted that the man won the case, and only has to pay back his original balance (no fees or interest.) He then sued the bank for the cancellation fees that he had put into the contract, and the bank counter-sued him for fraud (signing a contract is apparently fraud)

     

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    Anonymous Coward, Aug 14th, 2013 @ 6:59am

    Re: Man alters credit card contract

    Why should one party set all of the terms of a contract? Mr. Agarkov isn't a sleaze for doing this. Actually, he's on the savvy side.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

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    Anonymous Coward, Aug 14th, 2013 @ 10:41pm

    Re: Re: Man alters credit card contract

    It's in Russian contractual law: sending you as a member of a public a document (like the credit card solicitation) is considered an "oferta" (offer); sighing it is "accepta" (acceptance of the offer) that makes the contract valid. However, many forget that the second party is allowed to come up with counter-offer, so now they are making the oferta to the original party, and tables get reversed and that's precisely what happened to the bank.

    Moreover, the guy intentionally failed to pay his minimal payment, so the bank took him to court, and the court has confirmed that that contract was legal and binding. And after then, the guy sued the bank for the one-sided contract modifications (he cleverly inserted "in case of one-sided modification, the party making one pays the other party $million per modification"), and the previous court *confirmed* that the contract is legal and binding, so the bank has its back against the wall now: they cannot claim the contract is fraudulent because it has already been tested in the court and stood.

     

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  10.  
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    Merlin Arthur, Oct 30th, 2013 @ 4:36am

    hello

    i want to get rich quick

     

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  11.  
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    Carol, Dec 29th, 2013 @ 1:04pm

    To get rich quickly

    i want to get rich badly so i want anyone to help. No scams. email me asiimweC5@gmail.com

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]


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