FBI Made Up 'Threats' At Peace Rally, Lied To Congress, To Justify Spying Activity

from the feeling-safer? dept

Thought the days of the FBI considering any group with an agenda that disagreed with the federal government a threat to be "infiltrated" were over? Apparently not. It's been well-established that the FBI used a ridiculously broad net in figuring out who to investigate after September 11th, targeting all sorts of groups that were clearly not terrorist fronts, including a peace rally in Pittsburgh. When the news of that came out a few years back, it got a lot of attention. The ACLU filed a Freedom of Information Act to find out the details of what the FBI was doing at such rallies, and apparently a new report by the Inspector General suggests the FBI put a lot more effort into the coverup than it did in figuring out who they should actually be watching (found via Todd McDermid):
As the inspector general put it, the FBI's elaborate, "after-the-fact reconstruction" of the Pittsburgh events, designed to fabricate a counter-terrorism rationale for the rookie's surveillance mission, "was not corroborated by any witnesses or contemporaneous documents."
Basically, the FBI put a lot of effort into faking a terrorist threat at this event that would require having an FBI agent sent there. They even created a fake paper trail, and all this resulted in FBI director Robert Mueller giving "inaccurate and misleading" testimony to Congress. Of course, this isn't new. We seem to see this all the time from the Justice Department. So why is it that we keep allowing less and less oversight over the Justice Department, when they seem to just abuse their position more and more?


Reader Comments (rss)

(Flattened / Threaded)

  •  
    identicon
    DMNTD, Sep 21st, 2010 @ 3:26pm

    Never lose objectivenes because of a name..

    If you make a gang of people and give them authority..they will always be a gang first..its basic instinct. end.

     

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    Terry Jean, Sep 21st, 2010 @ 3:29pm

    FBI DEA

    Wake up FBI, DEA lie all the time They say and do what ever they want lie in court lie to the investigators that are suppose to catch them doing wrong. Do not trust any of them Federal procecuters lie too all do what they want.

     

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    identicon
    Anonymous Coward, Sep 21st, 2010 @ 3:32pm

    This is where private prosecution is required.

     

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    identicon
    abc gum, Sep 21st, 2010 @ 5:03pm

    They are just trying to live up to the legacy of J. Edgar Hoover. Hey, why not put on a dress?

     

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    TDR, Sep 21st, 2010 @ 5:29pm

    So how do we shut these organizations down? Because they've clearly (especially the CIA) outlived their usefulness.

     

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    Anonymous Coward, Sep 21st, 2010 @ 6:32pm

    What is new? They have been doing that since the 1920's.

     

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    Mr Big Content, Sep 21st, 2010 @ 11:53pm

    Typical Socialist Liberal Abuses

    Shows why they can’t be trusted in Government. Aren’t you glad we voted in George Bush to clean up this mess?

     

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    identicon
    Wolfy, Sep 22nd, 2010 @ 4:07am

    ALL law enforcement agents will lie, even in court, if they think it will further their aims. They claim that all thew want to do is "Protect and Serve", but the rest of the "mission statement" should read "our interests at all costs."

    Never believe a cop, especially if they've got you braced.

     

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    identicon
    Anonymous Coward, Sep 22nd, 2010 @ 5:19am

    us govt is run by real mafia now

    nixonized

     

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    rhett, Sep 22nd, 2010 @ 6:15am

    funk the police

    I don't think this article is news. It should surprise anyone. An article that would surprise us is where the general public actually won somehow.

     

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    Dark Helmet (profile), Sep 22nd, 2010 @ 6:43am

    Huh...

    And they said COINTELPRO was dead....

    Am I still going to be told to "take off my tinfoil hat"?

     

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    ChrisB (profile), Sep 22nd, 2010 @ 6:50am

    We do it in Canada too

    In 1998, the RCMP blew up a shack near a gas well, in order to give "credibility" to an informant. It was near Hythe, Alberta, and I remember talking to my uncle (a teacher in Hythe) who was scared sh!tless. Everyone thought the shack explosion was a terriorist attack (against the Oil Industry).

    For those that don't know, the informant eventually sold some dynamite to Wiebo Ludwig and Ludwig was charged with conspiracy.

     

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    Montezuma (profile), Sep 22nd, 2010 @ 7:12am

    So, baseball players lie to Congress and they get hit with charges and jail time, but the FBI(or insert any other government agency/agency head) and nothing happens? If law enforcement is caught lying in court, they get hit with all sorts of charges(misdemeanors and felonies), but this is tolerated?

    I believe it is time to reorganize these law enforcement arms of the U.S. Federal Government, as there are just too many and most are not needed. National Security Letters(NSLs, i.e. printed rights violations) should be done away with, and this stupid mentality that most law enforcement(in the U.S. and abroad) has gained since September 11th needs to be dropped. Everyone you see is not a "terrorist"(new euphemism for unlabeled target) and I refuse to give up my privacy or rights while you(law enforcement) fights "terrorist"(made up targets).

    Law enforcement has changed too much since I left the profession. From the looks of it, I am glad I did.

     

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      Dark Helmet (profile), Sep 22nd, 2010 @ 8:01am

      Re:

      "So, baseball players lie to Congress and they get hit with charges and jail time"

      Premises fail. Which baseball player that lied to congress and is now in jail are you referring to, exactly?

       

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    Anonymous Coward, Sep 22nd, 2010 @ 9:41am

    > If law enforcement is caught lying in court, they get hit with all sorts of charges(misdemeanors and felonies),

    The story I usually hear ends "prosecutor declines to press perjury charges". It's impossible to tell why they do that, but standard in-group bias (in-group = "us who send criminals to jail") seems adequate.

     

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    Overcast (profile), Sep 22nd, 2010 @ 10:17am

    Power tends to corrupt, and absolute power corrupts absolutely.

     

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    Gene Cavanaugh, Sep 22nd, 2010 @ 12:03pm

    Security and oversight

    At various times I held virtually every security clearance available in the US, and I can say we complete conviction: while there are occasionally valid reasons for security (and perhaps, though I don't believe it, lack of oversight), the real purpose of security/no_oversight is to protect the guilty from an informed public.

     

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    identicon
    Aaron, Sep 23rd, 2010 @ 8:45pm

    Answers

    Don't worry, though, folks. More government is always the answer!

     

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