Police Claim Burglars Used Facebook To Target Empty Homes; Proof Lacking

from the is-there-some-evidence? dept

Earlier this year, we noted that there was a moral panic brewing around the idea that burglars would monitor social networking sites like Twitter and Facebook to determine when people weren't home, and then strike. This seemed not only incredibly convoluted, but highly impractical. After all, just knowing that someone is going says little about how long they'll be gone or (more importantly) if there is still anyone else left in the house. It seemed that basic in-person surveillance could often be more productive.

However, the NY Times is now claiming that a series of burglary arrests in New Hampshire involve a group who used Facebook to pick their targets. The NYT report is based on a local press report in New Hampshire, which quotes the police making those claims. They offer no additional evidence that this is what the burglars actually did, so until there's a bit more proof, color me skeptical. We've seen police make similarly outrageous claims in the past, and this just has the sound of an urban legend rather than anything legit.


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    Ima Fish (profile), Sep 13th, 2010 @ 10:19am

    I work in the criminal justice system and the vast majority of break-ins are done without any forethought by drug addicts.

    The idea that there are master criminals around using social networking sites to carry out Ocean 11 styled break-ins in an attempt to steal your used TV is ludicrous.

    I'm not saying it could never happen, I'm just saying you have a better chance of being struck by lightening.

     

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      Dark Helmet (profile), Sep 13th, 2010 @ 10:32am

      Re:

      "I'm not saying it could never happen, I'm just saying you have a better chance of being struck by lightening."

      We have a better chance of having the head of a fetus entering our pelvis, resulting in easier breathing?

      I'm not sure how I feel about that....

       

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    Zacqary Adam Green (profile), Sep 13th, 2010 @ 10:44am

    Even assuming that this story isn't true, that still doesn't mean that broadcasting, to the entire Internet, the fact that you aren't home, along with the location of where said home that you aren't in is, is a particularly good idea.

     

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      Stuart, Sep 13th, 2010 @ 1:53pm

      Re:

      While it may not be a good idea to do it. It is a great idea to allow other to do so. Culling the herd so to speak.

       

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    Derek Kerton (profile), Sep 13th, 2010 @ 10:48am

    Scale

    Mike, counter point:

    Isn't it true that it would be easier to monitor MORE people over a social network than it would by parking in front of a few houses? Perhaps because this kind of "surveillance" scales to more people, it is possible that enterprising thieves will find it more efficient. You know, in much the same way that Craigslist or eBay scams are far more numerous than scams at a flea market or swap sale.

    Of course, that assumes the thieves can actually determine the home address of the person sending the tweet - and that they live close enough to rob that home. Or perhaps they are limiting their crimes to their circle of friends!

    Is the average B&E thief that smart, that thorough, that organized? Probably not. So I guess I'm with you, and would like to see more evidence that it actually occurs.

     

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      Michael, Sep 13th, 2010 @ 11:03am

      Re: Scale

      Unless you have some kind of criminal organization that can send thieves to multiple houses, doing weaker, widespread monitoring is not going to help.

      Cragslist and eBay scams have become popular because they can be sent to massive numbers of people without increasing the risk of being caught or requiring more manpower. Robbing houses doesn't really scale the same way.

      Now, combining the information you can get from Facebook with in-person monitoring could, actually, reduce risk of being caught because you have another data collection point that may give you a better idea of where the person is going and how long they will be gone. If course, watching them drag bags out to their car may do the same thing.


      This whole thing smells a lot like the old "don't say you are not home on your answering machine" garbage from a decade or two ago. Just in case someone that knows your address and phone number calls and decides it is a good idea to rob your house because you told them you were gone.

      It is garbage. Most thieves (as was pointed out) are criminals of opportunity looking for drug money. Thieves that are smart enough and calculating enough to be putting your FB profile together with your address are smart enough to get more accurate information in other ways.

       

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    Anonymous Coward, Sep 13th, 2010 @ 10:48am

    "I'm not saying it could never happen, I'm just saying you have a better chance of being struck by lightening."

    We have a better chance of transferring crude oil cargo from a large tanker to a smaller tanker, reducing the draft of the larger tanker to enable it to enter port?

    Seems that that happens quite often...

    --props to Dark Helmet

     

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    DH's Love Child (profile), Sep 13th, 2010 @ 10:57am

    But...

    The NYT report is based on a local press report in New Hampshire, which quotes the police making those claims.

    Police NEVER lie.

     

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    Robb Topolski (profile), Sep 13th, 2010 @ 11:00am

    Facebook says most of these cases have nothing to do with them...

    Facebook released the following statement to NECN (http://www.necn.com/pages/landing?blockID=307943):
    “We’ve been in contact with the Nashua police, and they confirmed that they while they have an ongoing investigation and have already made a number of arrests, the only Facebook link was that one of those arrested had a Facebook friend who posted about leaving town in the near future (which is why they believe that home was targeted) and it had nothing to do with Facebook Places. The police confirmed that the other burglaries had nothing to do with Facebook altogether.” (emphasis mine)
    That said, professional burglars have been known to use the obituaries to find out when families would be at services to target burglaries.

     

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    Martin LaBelle (profile), Sep 13th, 2010 @ 11:04am

    Case Study

    A few weeks ago I saw a report that this had actually happened. I admit I didn't do much more than listen to the news broadcast but apparently the case went down like this:

    • Person's House is robbed
    • Video footage of robbery caught by nanny cam
    • Victim uses social network to identify intruder on tape
    • Intruder was an aquantance from highschool that friended the victim
    • Interrogation of suspect revealed that he had target the victim based on her facebook status

    Again, not saying I buy it. But the fact that I have some "Facebook Friends" that I have not spoken to in years ranks it as plausible in my book

     

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      Michael, Sep 13th, 2010 @ 11:10am

      Re: Case Study

      The moral of the story...

      Don't tell people you barely know that you are leaving your house unattended for a long period of time.

      This is new to some people?

       

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    Martin LaBelle (profile), Sep 13th, 2010 @ 11:08am

    Case Study

    A few weeks ago I saw a report that this had actually happened. I admit I didn't do much more than psten to the news broadcast but apparently the case went down pke this:

    -Person's House is robbed
    -Video footage of robbery caught by nanny-cam
    -Victim uses social network to identify intruder on tape
    -Intruder was an aquantance from highschool that friended the victim
    -Interrogation of suspect revealed that he had target the victim based on her facebook status


    Again, not saying I buy it. But the fact that I have some "Facebook Friends" that I have not spoken to in years ranks it as plausible in my book

     

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    Michael, Sep 13th, 2010 @ 11:15am

    My old social networking tool

    That happened to me on my old social networking tool.

    It was called a bulletin board.

    I stuck a piece of paper on it that said:

    "My home will be empty between Oct 10th and 14th and my address is..."

    I'm not sure if I should be suing the bulletin board maker, the cork manufacturer, Stop & Shop (who's wall the board was on), the pushpin maker (without which, the paper would not have stayed up), BIC (they made the pen), the USPS (for giving my house a unique address with which it could be found), or the airline for taking me so far from my house.

     

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    DesignSmith, Sep 13th, 2010 @ 12:10pm

    Re:Re:Re:But

    By the way when it comes to tech, the southern half of NH is very much Boston North. (as opposed to North Boston)

    Think of Nashua as a smaller version of Green Bay.
    Even the local airport is now renamed "Manchester-Boston Regional"

    But the fact that NYT picked up the obvious headline grab from the local rag further reinforces my opinion that the web isn't hurting journalism any worse than the continuing decline in quality is hurting it.

    It has to be really slow news day when NYT follows up a (poorly done)story from The Nashua Telegraph...

     

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    Griff (profile), Sep 13th, 2010 @ 1:04pm

    This is new ?

    I always thought that an address on suitcase when setting off on a foreign holiday was pretty dumb.

    My pals twitter that "I've just booked a 3 week holiday in Canada in August" was pretty dumb, especially as he has quite a web presence as a raging tech geek (house full of expensive gadgets) and anyone who knows him online knows he works from home and has at some point given his home address as a business address.

    But he would then have to be burgled by someone pretty local and tech savvy. It may be true that the typical old style burglar is not up to this.

    But Burglar 2.0 is a different animal. He knows from your online review of the iPad that you probably have one, and that your planned backpacking in Nepal probably won't involve taking it with you. So he can drive to your house, take all your gadgets and not expect to be disturbed.
    Compared to clumsy opportunist burglaries, these sort of crimes could be extremely lucrative. A well organised operator could fill their calendar with "appointments" a month in advance then route plan with a travelling salesman algorithm.

    (My city's police now create "honeypot" houses, just like the bait cars of a few years ago. They do extremely well at catching people because passing burglars are very predictable as to which premises they will go for.

    Tip
    - have a burglar alarm
    - have a dog
    - lock the door when you're in
    and you won't be burgled

    Furthermore
    - don't keep carkeys in the kitchen drawer or on the little table by the front door )


    But as I say, burglar 2.0 is different...

     

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    Ariel (profile), Sep 13th, 2010 @ 1:59pm

    So.

    My policy of "don't post anything you don't want the whole world to know" is working out pretty well for me.

    Also, I only friend people on Facebook who I actually know and have seen in the last year or so. (High school acquaintances need not apply)

    My Twitter feed is wide open, but I use that for frivolity and pictures only.

    I wouldn't leave my door unlocked, and I wouldn't post my actual address on any social network. Ditto my phone number, my work hours/location, or whether or not I have a housesitter while I'm gone.

     

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    Eugene (profile), Sep 13th, 2010 @ 2:04pm

    On the one hand, my own experiments in Facebooking have shown me that unsolicited friending of random people is obnoxiously easy.

    On the other hand, organizing those specific people in way that makes it easy to track the relevant things they're doing is just plain obnoxious.

    Facebook is tailored toward inanity, not valuable information. Any useful information revealed by a given person on Facebook is likely to become buried in piles of shit before an opportunist has a chance to exploit it. It would require tons of serendipity in order for a burglar to consistently extract valuable information using a social program.

    Just keep in mind that many of the more famous burglaries in history required tons of serendipity. "Needing a lot of luck" does not instantly translate to "impossible".

    In other words: don't post personal information in a public forum, retards.

     

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    Elizabeth Windsor, Sep 13th, 2010 @ 2:05pm

    My Palace

    Hi all you burglars,
    I will be orf on a state visit in a few days time. My palace is stuffed full of jewels and crowns and stuff that I really don't care about. You are welcome to anything you find, but please don't harm the corgis.
    graciously yours,
    Her Royal Majesty.

     

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    Porkster, Sep 13th, 2010 @ 2:18pm

    And google too

    The probably used Google maps to find the houses.
    Maybe we should shut down the Internet and that would stop burglaries, for sure!

     

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      Michael, Sep 14th, 2010 @ 3:29am

      Re: And google too

      Better yet, let's charge internet providers and large web companies a "burglary tax" because they are profiting off of these burglaries - or at least, they are profiting off the internet and it's the internet's fault.

       

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    Jane, Oct 4th, 2010 @ 12:08pm

    Alisha McDevitt of NH Station WMUR In Misdemeanor Violation of NH State Law

    Alisha McDevitt of NH Station WMUR In Misdemeanor Violation of NH State Law

    Monday October 4, 2010

    Manchester, NH---Alisha McDevitt the News Director of NH news station WMUR is in violation of NH State Law RSA 651.V.XII, which is a misdemeanor.

    The NH law RSA 651.V.XII makes it illegal to report information on on an individual who has had charges brought against them but where the charges were either dropped or a non-guilty verdict was reached and where the arrest and charges were later annulled and expunged.

    RSA 651.V.XII, reads as follows: A person is guilty of a misdemeanor if, during the life of another who has had a record of arrest or conviction annulled pursuant to this section, he discloses or communicates the existence of such record.

    Alisha McDevitt ran a story in 2009 and again in 2010 that contained false and derogatory information about a NH man who was falsely charged with several crimes by the Londonderry NH Police Department in 2009, that were later dropped and a non-guilty for resisting arrest was reached unanimously by a jury of his peers.

    The charges were brought against the man by a Nashua, NH woman who was refused a rental apartment because she had several criminal convictions against her, was a drug addict and worked as a stripper. The woman filed assault and criminal threatening charges against the man and the Londonderry NH Police Department both failed to investigate the evidence in that case that would have exonerated the man and in many respects attempted to railroad the man.

    Chief William Hart and four of his officers and one detective are currently being investigated by the NH Attorney General's Office Criminal Investigation Bureau regarding numerous anomalies surrounding this case. The officers and one detective include: (Officer Glenn L. Aprille, Officer Jason M. Archambault, Officer Kelly W. Kulig, Officer James J. Freda and Detective Donald A. LaDuke). Chief Hart could not be reached regarding a comment .

    "Alisha McDevitt has destroyed this man's life by reporting information about the unidentified man that he was falsely accused of back in 2009, the man was cleared of all charges and received an annulment by a NH Superior Court," said Casey Clark, a close family friend of the man. "Alisha McDevitt should be held accountable for her actions in destroying this man's life. His wife left him because of this story, he lost his house, could not find a job and attempted suicide, it's disgusting what this woman and her so called news organization have done, I hope she is convicted of the misdemeanor," said Clark.

    http://janefifthestate.blogspot.com/

     

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    Jane, Oct 4th, 2010 @ 12:08pm

    Alisha McDevitt of NH Station WMUR In Misdemeanor Violation of NH State Law

    Alisha McDevitt of NH Station WMUR In Misdemeanor Violation of NH State Law

    Monday October 4, 2010

    Manchester, NH---Alisha McDevitt the News Director of NH news station WMUR is in violation of NH State Law RSA 651.V.XII, which is a misdemeanor.

    The NH law RSA 651.V.XII makes it illegal to report information on on an individual who has had charges brought against them but where the charges were either dropped or a non-guilty verdict was reached and where the arrest and charges were later annulled and expunged.

    RSA 651.V.XII, reads as follows: A person is guilty of a misdemeanor if, during the life of another who has had a record of arrest or conviction annulled pursuant to this section, he discloses or communicates the existence of such record.

    Alisha McDevitt ran a story in 2009 and again in 2010 that contained false and derogatory information about a NH man who was falsely charged with several crimes by the Londonderry NH Police Department in 2009, that were later dropped and a non-guilty for resisting arrest was reached unanimously by a jury of his peers.

    The charges were brought against the man by a Nashua, NH woman who was refused a rental apartment because she had several criminal convictions against her, was a drug addict and worked as a stripper. The woman filed assault and criminal threatening charges against the man and the Londonderry NH Police Department both failed to investigate the evidence in that case that would have exonerated the man and in many respects attempted to railroad the man.

    Chief William Hart and four of his officers and one detective are currently being investigated by the NH Attorney General's Office Criminal Investigation Bureau regarding numerous anomalies surrounding this case. The officers and one detective include: (Officer Glenn L. Aprille, Officer Jason M. Archambault, Officer Kelly W. Kulig, Officer James J. Freda and Detective Donald A. LaDuke). Chief Hart could not be reached regarding a comment .

    "Alisha McDevitt has destroyed this man's life by reporting information about the unidentified man that he was falsely accused of back in 2009, the man was cleared of all charges and received an annulment by a NH Superior Court," said Casey Clark, a close family friend of the man. "Alisha McDevitt should be held accountable for her actions in destroying this man's life. His wife left him because of this story, he lost his house, could not find a job and attempted suicide, it's disgusting what this woman and her so called news organization have done, I hope she is convicted of the misdemeanor," said Clark.

    http://janefifthestate.blogspot.com/

     

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    Cara, Oct 7th, 2010 @ 8:46am

    Chief William Hart of the Londonderry Police Department Under Criminal Investigation by NH Attorney General

    Saturday, October 2, 2010

    Chief William Hart of the Londonderry Police Department Under Investigation by NH Attorney General

    Londonderry, NH---William Hart, the Chief of Police for the Town of Londonderry, NH along with four of his officers and one detective (Glenn L. Aprille, Jason M. Archambault, Kelly W. Kulig, James J. Freda and Detective Donald A. LaDuke) are under investigation by the NH Attorney General's Criminal Investigation Unit for criminal, civil and constitutional rights violations.

     

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    Cara, Oct 7th, 2010 @ 8:46am

    Chief William Hart of the Londonderry Police Department Under Criminal Investigation by NH Attorney General

    Saturday, October 2, 2010

    Chief William Hart of the Londonderry Police Department Under Investigation by NH Attorney General

    Londonderry, NH---William Hart, the Chief of Police for the Town of Londonderry, NH along with four of his officers and one detective (Glenn L. Aprille, Jason M. Archambault, Kelly W. Kulig, James J. Freda and Detective Donald A. LaDuke) are under investigation by the NH Attorney General's Criminal Investigation Unit for criminal, civil and constitutional rights violations.

     

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    Cara Stevens NY Free Press, Oct 7th, 2010 @ 5:01pm

    Jo-Anne MacKenzie Editor of the Derry News In Criminal Misdemeanor Violation of NH State

    Law being investigated by NH Attorney General’s Office

    Thursday October 7, 2010

    By: Cara Stevens

    Derry, NH--- Jo-Anne MacKenzie Editor of the Derry News is in some trouble with the law for potential criminal violation of NH State Law RSA 651.V.XII, which is a misdemeanor. She is the second editor to be exposed for criminal violation of NH State law RSA 651 V.XII.

    The NH law RSA 651.V.XII makes it illegal to report information on an individual who has had charges brought against them but where the charges were either dropped or a non-guilty verdict was reached and where the arrest and charges were later annulled and expunged.

    Jo-Anne MacKenzie ran a story and Police Log in 2009 and again in 2010 that continue to run online that contained false and derogatory information about a NH man who was falsely charged with several crimes by the Londonderry NH Police Department in 2009, that were later dropped and a non-guilty for resisting arrest was reached unanimously by a jury of his peers.
    RSA 651.V.XII, reads as follows: A person is guilty of a misdemeanor if, during the life of another who has had a record of arrest or conviction annulled pursuant to this section, he discloses or communicates the existence of such record. The piece from Jo-Ann MacKenzie published as Editor of the Derry News and continues to be found online falls into this violation of NH State Law.
    The charges were brought against the man by a Nashua, NH woman (Jennifer Keller) who was refused a rental apartment because she had several criminal convictions against her, was a drug addict and worked as a stripper. The woman filed assault and criminal threatening charges against the man and the Londonderry NH Police Department both failed to investigate the evidence in that case that would have exonerated the man and in many respects attempted to railroad the man.

    Chief William Hart and four of his officers and one detective are currently being investigated by the NH Attorney General's Office Criminal Investigation Bureau regarding numerous violations surrounding this case. The officers and one detective include:(Officer Glenn L. Aprille, Officer Jason M. Archambault, Officer Kelly W. Kulig, Officer James J. Freda and Detective Donald A. LaDuke). Chief Hart could not be reached regarding a comment.

    “Jo-Anne MacKenzie has destroyed this man's life by reporting information about the unidentified man that he was falsely accused of back in 2009, the man was cleared of all charges and received an annulment by a NH Superior Court," said Casey Clark, a close family friend of the man.
    "Jo-Anne MacKenzie should be held accountable for her actions in destroying this man's life. He has lost everything because of this case and continues to be persecuted by the Derry News. He lost his job, his house, could not find a job and the worst thing has attempted suicide, it's disgusting what this woman and her so called news organization have done, I hope she is convicted of the misdemeanor," said Clark.

    Clark also stated that she believed that Jo-Anne MacKenzie did not run articles about bad cops being charged with crimes.

    "There was a case where Londonderry Police Officer Jason Archambault was arrested in Manchester and charged with assault against his girlfriend. This is a charge that the public has a right to know about, yet even though it was reported directly to Jo-Anne MacKenzie, she never ran the piece. It is obvious that she will not run stories, the truth about the police, because she is in bed with the police, it is clear," said Clark.

     

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    Jane Dunn, Oct 15th, 2010 @ 6:09am

    Al Getler of the Eagle Tribune Attacking The Defenseless With His Lies

    By Jane Dunn

    Ask Al Getler, Publisher of the Eagle Tribune about comedy and he will most likely point you to his web site promoting his weekend job as a ventriloquist and comedian. Ask Al Getler about reporting the truth and responsible journalism and he might try to distract you with a Three Stooges routine. But no one is laughing.

    The truth is that Al Getler promotes the tabloid lies of the Eagle Tribune and the Derry News, lies and inaccurate reporting that destroy lives. “The Derry News and Eagle Tribune ran Police Logs of an arrest of a Londonderry, NH man back in 2009 that they continue to run online, an innocent man who was falsely accused of several crimes,” said Casey Clark, a close family friend of the man.

    The issue is that a man was charged with crimes by the Londonderry Police Department brought by Jennifer Keller of Nashua, NH; a woman who was refused a rental apartment by the man and his fiancée because the man discovered that she had a criminal record, was a drug addict and worked as a stripper.

    “Keller responded to an online ad that the man and his fiancée placed to rent their unit. The woman (Keller) and her mother Kimberly Kelly went to view the unit. The woman was refused the apartment after it was discovered she and her mother had a criminal record, that Keller was a drug user and a stripper,” said Clark. “After the man refused to rent the woman the apartment she gave him provocative pictures of herself and attempted to solicit him for a place to live. When the man refused she became angry and threatened him with physical violence,” Clark said.

    The woman then filed assault and criminal threatening charges against the man through the Londonderry NH Police Department. The man provided evidence of what had happened to the Londonderry Police along with a Comcast Technician who was a witness to the event while doing work that day at the man’s house.

    “The Londonderry NH Police Department failed to investigate the evidence in that case; evidence that would have exonerated the man early on and by all accounts attempted to railroad the innocent man,” Clark Commented.

    The man was arrested; excessive use of force by the Londonderry Police was used during the man’s arrest leading to injuries to the man’s face. The man was held against his will and forced to hire an attorney to defend himself that cost him over $30,000 in attorney, investigator and legal fees.

    “He and his family went through hell during this time as Al Getler of the Eagle Tribune and Jo-Ann MacKenzie of the Derry News ran their degrading and inaccurate Police Logs, statements that were proven to be false,” said Clark.
    The charges against the man were dropped when Keller fled NH when pressed to testify. Keller fled to Indiana to work at JT’s a strip club there. Keller had attempted to file similar charges it was discovered by the man’s private investigator against three other men in the past five years, the Londonderry NH Police Department knew of at least one of these charges, yet they either failed or refused to investigate that evidence.

    Chief William Hart and four of his officers and one detective are currently being investigated by the NH Attorney General's Office; Criminal Investigation Bureau regarding numerous violations surrounding this case. The officers and one detective include (Officer Glenn L. Aprile, Officer Jason M. Archambault, Officer Kelly W. Kulig, Officer James J. Freda and Detective Donald A. LaDuke). Chief Hart could not be reached regarding a comment.

    The criminal allegations against Chief William Hart and his officer’s range from abuse of power; violations of the Fourth Amendment, false arrest and detention and excessive use of physical force. All the charges against the innocent man have since been expunged by the Rockingham Superior Court; in essence the incident legally did not occur.
    “With the man now having the arrest, charges and indictment expunged with no prior criminal record, it is a violation of NH State Law to even bring up the man’s name regarding this case or to discuss his case,” Clark said.

    The NH law RSA 651.V.XII makes it illegal to report information on an individual who has had charges brought against them but where the charges were either dropped or a non-guilty verdict was reached and where the arrest and charges were later annulled and expunged.
    “Basically Al Getler and Jo-Ann MacKenzie are in violation of this NH State law that makes it a criminal misdemeanor to communicate an expunged case under RSA 651.V.XII. As the information reported in the Police Logs are not correct and the information contained in these logs were downright lies by the Londonderry Police Department officers, and now being investigated by the NH Attorney General.

    RSA 651.V.XII, reads as follows: A person is guilty of a misdemeanor if, during the life of another who has had a record of arrest or conviction annulled pursuant to this section, he discloses or communicates the existence of such record. The Police Logs from Al Getler, Publisher of the Eagle Tribune and Jo-Ann MacKenzie, Editor of the Derry News continue to be found online and clearly falls into this violation of NH State Law.

    “Al Getler and Jo-Ann MacKenzie have purposely destroyed this man's life by reporting information about the unidentified man that he was falsely accused of back in 2009, the man was cleared of all charges and received an annulment by a NH Superior Court," said Clark. “Al Getler should be held accountable for his actions in destroying this man's life. He has lost everything because of this case and continues to be persecuted by the Eagle Tribune and Derry News. He lost his job, his house, could not find a job and the worst thing out of everything is the depression that followed where the man attempted suicide, it's disgusting what this man and woman and their so called news organization have done, I hope they are convicted of the misdemeanor," said Clark.

    Clark also stated that she believed that Both Al Getler and Jo-Ann MacKenzie do not publish articles about bad cops being charged with crimes. Clark’s proof seems to be irrefutable.

    "There was a case where Londonderry Police Officer Jason Archambault was arrested in Manchester in January of this year (2010) and charged with assault against his girlfriend. This is a charge that the public has a right to know about, yet even though it was reported directly to Al Getler and Jo-Ann MacKenzie, neither one ran the piece. It is obvious that they will not run stories about the police, the truth about the police, because as a tabloid, they are in bed with the police, that is clear," said Clark.

    It seems Al Getler is more successful as a ventriloquist than he is as a publisher of a financially troubled tabloid.

     

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    Jane Dunn, Oct 21st, 2010 @ 11:11am

    CNH Chairman Donna Barrett Blind to Publisher Al Getler's Violations of Law

    CNH Chairman Donna Barrett Blind to Publisher Al Getler's Violations of Law

    Read Full Story:

    http://janefifthestate.blogspot.com/2010/10/a...

     

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    identicon
    Jane Dunn, Oct 21st, 2010 @ 11:11am

    CNH Chairman Donna Barrett Blind to Publisher Al Getler's Violations of Law

    CNH Chairman Donna Barrett Blind to Publisher Al Getler's Violations of Law

    Read Full Story:

    http://janefifthestate.blogspot.com/2010/10/a...

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

  •  
    identicon
    Jane Dunn, Oct 21st, 2010 @ 11:14am

    CNH Chairman Donna Barrett Blind to Publisher Al Getler's Violations of Law

    CNH Chairman Donna Barrett Blind to Publisher Al Getler's Violations of Law

    Read Full Story:

    http://janefifthestate.blogspot.com/2010/10/al-getler-and-eagle-tribune-purveyor-of.html

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]


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