When Reporters Write A Story You Don't Like, Perhaps Don't Impersonate Them Asking For Sexual Encounters Or Nude Modeling Jobs

from the just-a-tip dept

Yikes. Last week, the blog "The Docket," which covers legal stories in Massachusetts, posted about an amusing, if slightly disturbing, email exchange between a recent law school grad, Jesse Clark, seeking a paralegal position, and the lawyer who (almost) hired him, Rosaleen Clayton. You should read the whole thread. It starts out with Clayton almost offering Clark a job, but expressing some concerns about his work, and suggesting that perhaps they try a few freelance (paid) projects, and if the quality is good, she would offer full-time employment. Now, you may or may not think this is a reasonable offer, and I can certainly understand why some job seekers might not like it. But the response should be to gracefully move on, seeking full-time employment elsewhere. Instead, Clark responded by claiming he didn't understand why she wouldn't offer full time employment based on his writing samples and good grades.

Clayton, in response, gave a very honest assessment to Clark of her concerns. Some might consider her response a bit harsh, but it appears to just be honest constructive criticism -- which is actually quite useful. Clark responded defensively, and slightly threateningly (in saying he is going to call someone who works for Clayton and let them know that she wanted Clark to give a report on how she answered the phones) and the whole thing spirals completely out of control. We're not just talking about burning a few bridges here, but setting a whole town on fire. Clayton points out that Clark's response is probably not a good way to kick off a career in the tight-knit legal community, and Clark gets ever more insulting -- including the two statements that standout:
  • What next? Do you want me to kiss your feet her Royal Highness?
  • It's amazing that the Ma Bar lets women practice law. Shouldn't you be home cleaning and raising children?
Wow. But, okay, even if you grant that the guy was having a bad day and pissed off about not getting the job, you would think that after all this he would recognize that perhaps it's best not to fly off the handle like that. Apparently not. After The Docket reported on this story, so did Kashmir Hill at AboveTheLaw -- and Clark, none too happy about either report, decided that he was going to respond in his own special way.

In response to the report on The Docket, Clark apparently changed a male modeling profile he had set up so that it was in the name of The Docket reporter, Noah Schaffer, saying that Schaffer was available for nude photo shoots (this post also notes that Clark apparently posted a Craigslist post "responding" to Clayton's help-wanted ad, but does not identify the nature of this post). As for Kashmir Hill, she discovered (after getting a barrage of phone calls on her mobile phone from unknown men) that someone (who she suggests was Clark) put up a "casual encounters" ad with her mobile phone number and photo on Craigslist, suggesting she wanted to get together for casual sex.

Both Hill and Shaffer seem to take this in an amazingly good natured manner, though Hill points to recent case law of others posting such fake Craigslist ads being arrested and charged with various crimes. In Hill's discussion of this, she spoke with Shaffer who said that Clark:
"sent me a note threatening legal action, but then added that he'd take down the model site if I removed the blog item about him."
Apparently, someone doesn't know when to quit.


Reader Comments (rss)

(Flattened / Threaded)

  1.  
    identicon
    Pixelation, Jun 3rd, 2010 @ 7:55am

    Kinda like that security guy with a small dick. These guys need to learn to walk away.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  2.  
    identicon
    Jaws4theRevenge, Jun 3rd, 2010 @ 7:55am

    I predict a website will soon appear offering "private and sexy" appearances by one Mike Masnick...

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  3.  
    identicon
    Anonymous Coward, Jun 3rd, 2010 @ 8:07am

    Poor gen y'ers. Put in a protective bubble their entire childhood then suddenly thrust into the real world, with real criticism, real expectations, and real consequences. I'm sure this isn't the first time he's shown such gross misjudgment, however it's probably the first time that any real consequences were attached (i.e. probably being blackballed from his chosen career). Heck, this was probably seen as high hilarity and an epic prank during his college days.

    Maybe he can have his mom call everyone involved and smooth out the situation.

    Word of advice, the real world doesn't behave like a message board, facebook, or twitter. Trolls get shot down pretty quick.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  4.  
    identicon
    NAMELESS ONE, Jun 3rd, 2010 @ 8:27am

    AWWW but it was fun

    pretending to be TAM and doing gay anal pron

     

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  5.  
    icon
    Jay (profile), Jun 3rd, 2010 @ 8:28am

    What's funny...

    The guy got worse! He's since left the profession at least in Mass. because it's not "prestigious" enough. Here's hoping he finds a job but really, he needs help.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  6.  
    icon
    Jay (profile), Jun 3rd, 2010 @ 8:29am

    Hmmm... The url didn't show up.

    http://shillingmesoftly.blogspot.com/search/label/Jesse%20J.%20Clark

    Read about his other escapades. Seems the man is built to make drama.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  7.  
    identicon
    Anonymous Coward, Jun 3rd, 2010 @ 8:35am

    youtube video of woman in question

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  8.  
    identicon
    Grog, Jun 3rd, 2010 @ 8:44am

    This guy is going to be a lawyer? It takes a lot to get a date with the bar ethics board, but something tells me this one is going to go the distance...

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  9.  
    icon
    Comboman (profile), Jun 3rd, 2010 @ 9:28am

    Expectation of privacy?

    There's no denying that the applicant was a huge asshole, but does that justify publishing a private email correspondence in a blog for public ridicule? Doesn't a job seeker have some reasonable expectation of privacy in the job application process? Is this how professionals (much less lawyers) behave? There is plenty of unethical behavior on both sides here (which does nothing to improve my opinion of lawyers in general).

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  10.  
    identicon
    Anonymous Coward, Jun 3rd, 2010 @ 9:28am

    This guy sounds like he would be an excellent lawyer.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  11.  
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    Dark Helmet (profile), Jun 3rd, 2010 @ 9:41am

    Somebody...

    Is trying to emulate Tucker Max...which is incredibly stupid....

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  12.  
    icon
    Trails (profile), Jun 3rd, 2010 @ 9:44am

    Re:

    You mean my prayers have been heard?!? Err, wait, I mean uh...

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  13.  
    identicon
    Anonymous Coward, Jun 3rd, 2010 @ 10:00am

    Re: Expectation of privacy?

    He's looking for a job, not consulting his doctor... so no.

    If you mail me a piece of paper through the normal ol snail mail I can photocopy it and hand it out to people on the street. I own that correspondence.

    There is no expectation of privacy.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  14.  
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    Trails (profile), Jun 3rd, 2010 @ 10:11am

    Careericide

    Also known as "Employment Sepuku", "Workamikaze" or colloquially as "Would you like fries with that?" is the act of single-handedly doing things so dumb as to demonstrate your inability to successfully perform complex tasks or interact with others.

    Often linked to "foot-in-mouth" disease, this act typically results in trailers, moves to Des Moines, mustard stains, and many dining occasions at the local Denny's (typically one of the ones found in Des Moines).

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  15.  
    identicon
    Greg G, Jun 3rd, 2010 @ 10:40am

    Re: Somebody...

    At least "I Hope They Serve Beer In Hell" was funny.
    Often disgusting, but funny nonetheless.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  16.  
    identicon
    Jake, Jun 3rd, 2010 @ 10:44am

    Re:

    Personally, I'd think that the least of his worries. Frank Sinatra's estate could weigh in on the filesharing issue one day.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  17.  
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    Russ (profile), Jun 3rd, 2010 @ 10:49am

    getting a job

    Temp to perm is become very popular. With the costs of onboarding and even greater costs of letting someone go, many companies are making sure that they know what they are getting.

    And frankly, most job interviews are chemistry tests, not qualification reviews. And this interview is certainly a runaway exothermic reaction.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  18.  
    icon
    Mike Masnick (profile), Jun 3rd, 2010 @ 11:36am

    Re: Expectation of privacy?

    There's no denying that the applicant was a huge asshole, but does that justify publishing a private email correspondence in a blog for public ridicule?

    The email originally redacted the names of those involved, but apparently Clark responded publicly, revealing his own name and the name of the lawyer he interviewed with...

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  19.  
    identicon
    Anonymous Coward, Jun 3rd, 2010 @ 11:53am

    Re: AWWW but it was fun

    Pretending to be TAM, ... but the gay and anal part is real!

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  20.  
    icon
    Alan Gerow (profile), Jun 3rd, 2010 @ 1:31pm

    Re: Expectation of privacy?

    What idiot would ever expect an e-mail to be considered private? Never say anything in an e-mail that you wouldn't yell across a room.

    Privacy is a level of trust between two individuals, not a byproduct of technology. If these two people did not agree on the conversation being private, then there should have been no expectation of such.

    Also, just because someone sends an e-mail that says "this is confidential" at the bottom ... unless the receiver previously agrees to that condition before reading, it is in fact NOT confidential. The intention of the sender is great and all, but unless there are contracts and agreements, it's worthless.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  21.  
    icon
    Chuck Norris' Enemy (deceased) (profile), Jun 3rd, 2010 @ 1:59pm

    Re: Careericide

    Sorry, no Denny's in Des Moines according to Dennys.com...I guess Iowa is less redneck than you thought.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  22.  
    icon
    BearGriz72 (profile), Jun 4th, 2010 @ 2:02am

    Re: Careericide

    "Employment Sepuku"
    ROFLMAO!

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  23.  
    icon
    Richard (profile), Jun 4th, 2010 @ 2:10am

    "Apparently, someone doesn't know when to quit."

    Oh, that made me laugh. Someone who, by the looks of it, is trying to make themselves unemployable "doesn't know when to quit"

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  24.  
    icon
    Comboman (profile), Jun 4th, 2010 @ 1:14pm

    Re: Re: Expectation of privacy?

    Privacy is a level of trust between two individuals, not a byproduct of technology. If these two people did not agree on the conversation being private, then there should have been no expectation of such.

    I didn't say there was an expectation of privacy because it was an email. I said there was an expectation of privacy because of the context of a job application process. If you are applying for a new job, would you like those details to get back to your current employer?

    Also, just because someone sends an e-mail that says "this is confidential" at the bottom ... unless the receiver previously agrees to that condition before reading, it is in fact NOT confidential. The intention of the sender is great and all, but unless there are contracts and agreements, it's worthless.

    It is true that those types of one-sided conditions are not legally binding, but any reasonably ethical person should voluntarily abide by them, especially a lawyer and even more especially in the context of a job application.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  25.  
    identicon
    Anon, Jun 6th, 2010 @ 1:13am

    Go man go!

    Great man! I admire him for his courage in standing up to his beliefs, which may not be as misguided as this biased coverage seems to imply. I would have offered him a job myself if I could, but he is sure to get one. He is bold, fearless, resourceful, and willing to take risks. Carry on!

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  26.  
    identicon
    PCDEC, Jun 7th, 2010 @ 1:58pm

    One should weigh the whole risk vs reward aspect first tho.


    Risk: going to jail.
    Reward: getting a job.

    The risk is too great for the reward IMO.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  27.  
    identicon
    mary, Apr 19th, 2012 @ 10:16am

    Re:

    whaaat ???? you getta be kidding...

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]


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