Are Computers in Africa Really Weapons of Mass Destruction?

from the black-hats-on-the-dark-continent? dept

In recent months, a number of folks have argued that the arrival of high-speed bandwidth in Africa represents not an opportunity for economic growth, but a dangerous threat to the world. According to these Western pundits who are, incidentally, often promoting their cybersecurity services, computers and connectivity in Africa either pave the way for terrorists to unleash cyber-attacks or for botnet operators to gather millions of unprotected machines into their control. Although we've spent considerable time debunking the hysteria around cyberwar, this new version of the meme is even more unfounded.

Worrying that Africa is going to start producing top-notch hackers in any great quantity seems pretty absurd, when we're talking about a continent where basic literacy, not to mention programming prowess, is a challenge. When Franz-Stefan writes in one of the articles above, that "skillful cybercriminals operating out of an unregulated Internet cafe in the slums of Addis Ababa, Lagos, or Maputo" will create the world's biggest botnets, he shows that he has little understanding of those "slums." For starters, electricity is intermittent enough to make cyberwar a sputtering failure. Secondly, although there are pockets of terrorists on the continent, by and large, elsewhere terrorists have access to far better finances and bandwidth than their comrades in Mogadishu. The fact that those terrorists haven't used the Internet for these types of attacks with any regularity suggests that they place far more faith in tried-and-true methods of terrorizing, and there is every reason to believe that those in Africa will be the same.

Finally, as Miquel Hudin points out, it is ridiculous (and very likely offensive) to think that Africans are any more likely to keep their PCs insecure than anyone else. An American or European who points to Africa as the source of infected botnet computers is wildly hypocritical considering the enormous number of insecure computers that wealthy, educated Westerners have in their homes and offices. It seems quite unlikely that African computers are any more insecure than elsewhere.

Frantic articles painting Africa as just another threat, especially with regard to a great opportunity for the continent - connectivity - are reckless and miss both on-the-ground context and level-headed responses to the challenges of the continent.



Reader Comments (rss)

(Flattened / Threaded)

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    awd, Apr 5th, 2010 @ 5:04am

    If the Africans are really pressed for cash, they might use alternative OSs on their computers rather than what the rich, spoiled Windows users in developed countries use. In that case, they'll be more secure than most (by obscurity rather than security).

     

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      vivaelamor (profile), Apr 5th, 2010 @ 5:16am

      Re:

      "If the Africans are really pressed for cash, they might use alternative OSs on their computers rather than what the rich, spoiled Windows users in developed countries use"

      That would depend how many free copies Microsoft give to entice the schools into teaching 'the Microsoft way'. Schools are pretty frugal even in developed countries yet seem to be determined to teach only on Microsoft products.

       

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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 5th, 2010 @ 5:22am

    So what I get from this is black people = threat to the world.

    Makes me wonder if any of these "experts" happen to have ghost costumes lying around......

     

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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 5th, 2010 @ 5:23am

    I agree

     

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    Wolfy, Apr 5th, 2010 @ 5:24am

    One word.

    Nigeria.

     

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    NullOp, Apr 5th, 2010 @ 6:14am

    More dangerous...

    The most dangerous tool of mass destruction is the human mind. Africa has an overwhelming poverty level. The basic want for a better life can be the impetus for some people to follow a charismatic leader such as Hitler or Obama. Will PC's and the net in Africa play into terrorism over the next decade. Yes. To what degree, however, can not be accurately predicted.

     

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      Anonymous Coward, Apr 5th, 2010 @ 6:30am

      Re: More dangerous...

      Godwins Law. You=fail.

       

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      Guy, Apr 13th, 2010 @ 5:13am

      Re: More dangerous...

      Will there be individuals in Africa that use new technology for illegal activity? Yes. It's occurring in developed countries already, so much so that's it's created an entire new industry just for securing data and countering hackers. So it seems logical to assume that if nations like America, China, and India can produce hackers with access to PCs, Africa will experience something similar.

      But developed nations already recognize that the benefits that come from computers outweigh the risk that come from internet security hazards. No one suggests disconnecting America to secure it's data from it's own endemic hacking, it seems absurd to try to use that argument to keep Africa from connecting to the rest of the world. Leave the scarecrows at the door please.

       

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    Michial Thompson, Apr 5th, 2010 @ 6:15am

    What's the definition of WMD?

    If Africa is getting highspeed internet everywhere, our spam filters will sure get a workout...

    Avery starving little Nigerian will suddenly have a rich father that fled the country to avoid something, and they need you to give them money to get the information to collect their millions of dollars....

    No offense, if we just cut the wires to Africa for the internet and left it all to it's self all of our email spam boxes would be so much better for it.

     

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      Dan (profile), Apr 5th, 2010 @ 6:19am

      Re: What's the definition of WMD?

      Just because a scam mentions Nigeria, doesn't mean it originates there. I'm sure most don't. I'll assume you're being sarcastic.

       

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    www-addict, Apr 5th, 2010 @ 6:35am

    WMD = Windows

    Windows is a WMD. Hopefully the rich over-induldged westerners will someday "get it" and stop using Windows. Using Windows is like leaving the front door of your house open with the key in the lock... Oh yea.. if your using Windows, I guess you should go ahead and leave you wallet and Cash and credit cards on the sidewalk in front of your house.. ooops sorry I almost forgot, if you using Windows, everyone prolly already has that stuff that "belonged"" to you. Computers in Africa.... Awesome...Maybe we should also send some industry and birth control. If your sending stuff somewhere how about sending some CFS (Common F$%&#$* Sense) to the USA!

     

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    suezz, Apr 5th, 2010 @ 6:53am

    this is probably microsoft's way of getting the wto and the use government involved so they can force their os on the african people.

    they can't let a new market go to linux so when people can afford their os you make the government force it on them cause it is for their own good. come on people let microsoft and the government decide what computer you use.

     

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    Michael, Apr 5th, 2010 @ 6:59am

    I knew it!

    There is going to be a huge network of OLPC's that eventually becomes the most destructive weapon of terrorism in history!

    Terrorists usually like the visceral image of bodies on the news. Until they manage to come up with a way to electrocute people through their keyboards via Skype, I think they will spend their precious resources on more conventional weapons than computers.

    Of course, planning their attacks on MI5 offices by finding them on google maps may still be in the works...

     

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    Dark Helmet (profile), Apr 5th, 2010 @ 7:33am

    Ah, racism...

    Though it has declined somewhat, this is how the vestiges of racism shows itself.

    AAAHHH! Those wierdos with chocolate faces are going to get computers! STOP THEM!

     

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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 5th, 2010 @ 8:05am

    you need to learn how botnets work. the handlers dont have to be online 24 hours a day sometimes only a minute every few days is enough. everything is remote not running in africa. hey you africans get off my lawn reporting by masnick!

     

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      Kevin Donovan (profile), Apr 5th, 2010 @ 8:27am

      Re:

      And you need to learn to read a little more closely.

      First of all, Masnick isn't the author.

      Second of all, being online, even for a few moments a day, is insufficient if you lack the computer skills to harness a botnet.

      Finally, if the botnet herder were to be from somewhere besides Africa (a more likely scenario), they'll have trouble using computers in "slums" in their botnet because those computers will be unreliable.

       

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        Anonymous Coward, Apr 5th, 2010 @ 8:35am

        Re: Re:

        sorry thought all the guest writers had quit or had papers due and didnt have time. then masnick hired someone who isnt well informed.

         

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    BP, Apr 5th, 2010 @ 8:19am

    RE: Are Computers in Africa Really Weapons of Mass Destruction?

    We used to think this about China, India and Japan too. Remember when Japan only made cheap knockoffs for electronics? Remember when GM and Ford ruled and other cars from Asian countries (and most European cars as well) were chintzy little things?

    Africa isn't close today, but what about tomorrow? The arrogant attitude of "they aren't capable" sure hasn't worked so far. I'm not saying that Africa is ever going to be a world threat, but assuming they'll never be one or that they aren't and will never be capable is folly.

     

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    NullOp, Apr 5th, 2010 @ 9:12am

    Ah, racism...

    Old rule of looking for conspiracies....you'll find it. So if you're looking for racism, you'll find it. At least what YOU THINK is racism.

    Personally I think a good deal of the federal government has gone racist in a big way! Is is true? I think so...

     

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    Alatar, Apr 5th, 2010 @ 9:18am

    Before saying "blah blah Africa insecure computers"

    Please remind me the market share for these insecure software in our allegedly "better" Western world :
    - Internet explorer 6? Any IE ? (tip : most of them don't know what a browser is and will answer "oh, I use Google").
    - Old and unpatched versions of MS Office?
    - MS windows. Bonus challenge : find out in your surroundings about somebody who knows what Windows Update is.
    - How many "superior Westerners" know what an antivirus is? A Firewall? Have got both, up to date and with a licence still running (not that 1-year Norton licence they got 4 years ago when they bought their machines).

    The list could go on...
    Here in France, in our days, computers are little more than "the thing you turn on and use in order to connect to Facebook or MSN" (that's how Frogs call WLM). The hacker generation seems far behind.

    So will give Africa some PCs really mess things up more than they are today?

     

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    Tom Landry (profile), Apr 5th, 2010 @ 10:37am

    if all else fails against an African cyber-attack just remember, we have 4chan.....

     

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    Neil Schwartzman, Apr 5th, 2010 @ 3:03pm

    To say Africa is more or less vulnerable than anywhere else is racist is inane. One need only take a look at the open relay problem in South Korean schools that was one of the largest transportation channels for spam at the beginning of the decade to understand that broadband + computers - highly skilled network and anti-abuse administrators = spam.

    I agree there won't be the nexus of evil geniuses like in eastern Europe, with unemployed and highly-educated programmers, but rapid-fire deployment in Africa will mean widespread botnet infection.

     

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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 5th, 2010 @ 6:31pm

    "terrorists to unleash cyber-attacks or for botnet operators to gather millions of unprotected machines into their control."

    and I remember there used to be laws against taking laptops that had above a certain amount of processing power to other countries under the pretext that they could be used to somehow calculate nuclear formulas and help these countries make nuclear weapons. There used to even be entire discussions on this. I can't find any reference to it now and I realize it's a bunch of nonsense, but I do remember something about that.

     

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    Louis, Apr 5th, 2010 @ 9:40pm

    Stupid topic really

    Computers have been in Africa for years and years. I'm from Africa and my family bought a PC in the 80s just like many Americans and Europeans. This view point just shows a ignorance about Africa.

    Broadband has also been in Africa for years.

    Neither of these are as widespread (or as fast) as in developed worlds but they are there.

    Actually lots of African people are skipping PCs and going straight to mobile solutions as these are way more practical.

     

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    Jennilyn, Apr 7th, 2010 @ 8:59am

    Generally speaking computers or any other high tech gadgets and devices can be use for massive distraction. It could happen to any country not just Africa.

     

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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 13th, 2010 @ 6:26am

    Will there be individuals in Africa that use new technology for illegal activity? Yes. It's occurring in developed countries already, so much so that's it's created an entire new industry just for securing data and countering hackers. So it seems logical to assume that if nations like America, China, and India can produce hackers with access to PCs, Africa will experience something similar.

    But developed nations already recognize that the benefits that come from computers outweigh the risk that come from internet security hazards. No one suggests disconnecting America to secure it's data from it's own endemic hacking, it seems absurd to try to use that argument to keep Africa from connecting to the rest of the world. Leave the scarecrows at the door please.

     

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    Wes, Dec 27th, 2010 @ 1:40pm

    This is one of the most absurd things i've heard. Weapons? Come on ... they need all the tech and knowledge that they can get.

     

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    GramJ, Jan 13th, 2011 @ 8:16am

    Africa Computers

    Thanks for the information on this topic. It does seem a bit silly to assume that having computers with better internet connections in Africa would be some sort of risk. It seems like having access to the internet in those areas would open a lot more opportunities for people to learn and have access to mass amounts of information.

     

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