Obama: We Must Move Forward On ACTA

from the missing-the-point dept

With the EU Parliament soundly voting against ACTA secrecy and current proposals, lots of folks have been wondering how the US was going to respond. So far, it's not looking good. The USTR gave a giant no comment, and President Obama (who had been pretty quiet on ACTA himself) addressed ACTA in a speech, where he expressed strong support for continuing to move forward with ACTA.

What was telling, however, was how he described ACTA -- which is that he used the bogus arguments for what people think ACTA is about, rather than what's actually in the agreement. It's a political trick:
"There's nothing wrong with other people using our technologies, we welcome it -- we just want to make sure that it's licensed, and that American businesses are getting paid appropriately," Obama said. "That's why [the Office of the U.S. Trade Representative] is using the full arsenal of tools available to crack down on practices that blatantly harm our businesses, and that includes negotiating proper protections and enforcing our existing agreements, and moving forward on new agreements, including the proposed Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement."
Except, of course, ACTA goes way, way, way beyond that. It's disappointing that Obama, who keeps insisting he's in favor of greater transparency in government seems to be ignoring the fact that the USTR has been anything but transparent on ACTA, and that the whole effort has really been a blatant push by the entertainment industry and pharma to engage in legislative laundering to push through all sorts of restrictive rules that have nothing, whatsoever, to do with protecting against counterfeiting.


Reader Comments (rss)

(Flattened / Threaded)

  •  
    icon
    aguywhoneedstenbucks (profile), Mar 11th, 2010 @ 12:55pm

    Change

    Well, he did promise change. I don't remember anyone saying it would be for the better. He's just trying to keep his biggest campaign promise.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

    •  
      icon
      william (profile), Mar 11th, 2010 @ 3:22pm

      Obama is a bust

      I hate to say this, but by now if people are still believing Obama is all good and mighty and will be bringing major changes for the good for the U.S. citizens, they are living in Lala-Land.

      Everyone is all hypnotized by the "campaign" and the dream that he built with his "promises". Time to wake up to the morning call.

      He promised the world, but in the end, he's just another typical, regular, run-of-the-mill, regular Joe, powerless president entangled in the quagmire of politics, power, greed, money, and big corps that is also known as the Capital Hill.

       

      reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

    •  
      identicon
      The Mighty Buzzard, Mar 11th, 2010 @ 4:14pm

      Re: Change

      Eh, that's why I voted for the guy. Since both parties were in dire need of a good slash and burn, I got my fiddle, cast my vote, and did my best Nero impersonation. Can't say as I'm disappointed either. Nobody can fuck things up like someone who's willing, eager even, to take away your freedoms For Your Own Good.

      Maybe now the latest voting generations will understand why we went about thirty years without electing a radical leftist and we won't have to do it again for another thirty years or so.

       

      reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

      •  
        identicon
        Wake up, Mar 11th, 2010 @ 8:20pm

        Re: Re: Change

        Except, nothing he's done would indicate that hes a leftist? Hes expanded the war, given trillions to big business, uses foreign political corruption to force our agenda on the worlds poorest citizens and... oh yeah.. privatizes some of the most important public works for patent free innovation (NASA).

        I think thats a blatant acceleration of the same sleazy agenda that the last President accelerated from the sleazy agenda before him..

        Partisan politics is a farce and if you think theres a difference, you probably think Raaslin is real.

         

        reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

        •  
          identicon
          Anonymous Coward, Mar 11th, 2010 @ 9:07pm

          Re: Re: Re: Change

          The problem is that one party may push for good legislature when it comes to topic X and bad legislature when it comes to topic Y. The second party may push for good policy when it comes to topic Y and bad legislature when it comes to topic X.

          What does the public end up with? The worst of both worlds. It's all a scam, both parties know we're gonna end up with the worst of both worlds ahead of time and they intend it to be so.

          See, a Republican gets elected and he pushes for bad policy when it comes to topic X. Bad policy gets instated. So the democrats promote good policy when it comes to topic X but bad policy when it comes to topic Y. So then, because the people hate the republicans position on topic X they vote for the democrats, who have the exact opposite position on this topic. But the democrats fail to correct topic X, they may even pretend to try but they'll have the other party stop it on purpose or they'll just put little effort in changing policy when it comes to topic X and the media will ignore it. Then the democrats push for bad policy on topic Y, they get it passed, the people get mad so they vote for the republicans who also fail to fix the problem and they then continue to push for worse policy on topic X. The cycle continues and the public just ends up with the worst of both worlds while the republicans and democrats keep pointing fingers at each other and fixing nothing.

           

          reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

          •  
            identicon
            The Mighty Buzzard, Mar 11th, 2010 @ 10:47pm

            Re: Re: Re: Re: Change

            Pretty jaded there but that's democracy for you. It never was any better than all the other forms of government, usually worse in fact. It's just consistently terrible rather than oscillating between atrocious and fantastic every new rulership or two.

             

            reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

          •  
            identicon
            Anonymous Coward, Mar 11th, 2010 @ 11:17pm

            Re: Re: Re: Re: Change

            "and the media will ignore it."

            Or if the media doesn't ignore it, they merely promote the other party, who then gets elected, doesn't fix it, and makes something else worse.

             

            reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

        •  
          identicon
          The Mighty Buzzard, Mar 11th, 2010 @ 10:41pm

          Re: Re: Re: Change

          The trillions he gave to big business are a hallmark of the left. Read up on FDR. He didn't do it to make friends or money, he did it for control. Health care reform, bunch of executive orders, tax hikes that hit everyone across the entire income range. Forcing your agenda on the people (saying the poor here is just blatant class warfare rhetoric) through political corruption is also a huge leftist baby, ask any Russian. Yeah, I think I can say leftist and get away with it.

          There are huge differences in partisan politics, just not in the politicians for the most part. I'm thinking you're just disgusted that Barak wasn't the second coming everyone hyped him up to be. He's more or less exactly what I hoped he would be.

           

          reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

  •  
    icon
    Ima Fish (profile), Mar 11th, 2010 @ 2:07pm

    I have to admit it's pretty clever, in an evil and twisted sort of way. Basically he's saying, "Even if the world disagrees with what we're trying to accomplish with the ACTA, we have to keep trying."

    It puts the debate in the context of being "us versus them." I.e., us versus China, Europe, and everyone else who is "using our technologies" without paying.

    That takes the focus off the fact that the "us versus them" fight is actually between the citizens of the world against the IP industry, including the music industry, the film industry, the broadcast industry, the pharma industry, etc.

    From now on, every time some country stands up for our rights as citizens against the IP industry, Obama will just argue that the country is blocking his fight to protect our technologies from being stolen.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

    •  
      identicon
      Ryan, Mar 11th, 2010 @ 2:56pm

      Re:

      This is actually more or less his MO. Take health care; I swear to God, there is a new story every other day of a new speech where he says(same thing everytime): "The time for talking is over. We really, really (no, really!) need to pass this for the American people!" Apparently he just intends to strong-arm every opponent to pass everything he wants in every conceivable realm. It's not their-country-vs-our-country, it's him-vs-the-world.

       

      reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

    •  
      icon
      Designerfx (profile), Mar 11th, 2010 @ 4:15pm

      Re:

      it's sad, but this is basically what can cause a violent revolution.

      when it becomes corporations versus the citizens, corporations will lose every time. meanwhile I can't believe corporations are stupid enough to still push for this.

       

      reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

      •  
        identicon
        Enron, Mar 11th, 2010 @ 8:25pm

        Re: Re:

        Corporations (and public trust capitalism) are like horses they will eat until they die. They exist only to consume and grow. They have no allegiance to there country or clients as long as they can help them lock in more growth.

         

        reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

      •  
        icon
        John Fenderson (profile), Mar 12th, 2010 @ 4:59am

        Re: Re:

        Violent revolution appears to be the only thing we have left, and that makes me incredibly sad.

         

        reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

    •  
      identicon
      Anonymous Coward, Mar 11th, 2010 @ 5:15pm

      Re:

      You hit a nerve here, but take a step back further. What it does is legitimize US export of knowledge by business. It allows US business the legal capability to exploit cheap overseas labor.

      And you know what happens when knowledge is exported, right? Over time, you loose the ability to innovate within your own borders because all your inhouse knowledge is exported.

      This is a very bad policy decision for the country. The most worrysome effects may not be apparent right now because everyone's looking to make it cheaper, but in 40 years, it's very, very possible that China and India will leapfrog the US on several fronts.

       

      reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

    •  
      identicon
      Anonymous Coward, Mar 11th, 2010 @ 5:21pm

      Re:

      You hit a nerve here, but take a step back further. What it does is legitimize US export of knowledge by business. It allows US business the legal capability to exploit cheap overseas labor.

      And you know what happens when knowledge is exported, right? Over time, you loose the ability to innovate within your own borders because all your inhouse knowledge is exported.

      This is a very bad policy decision for the country. The most worrysome effects may not be apparent right now because everyone's looking to make it cheaper, but in 40 years, it's very, very possible that China and India will leapfrog the US on several fronts.

       

      reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

  •  
    icon
    John (profile), Mar 11th, 2010 @ 2:09pm

    I wish I could say I was surprised

    but unfortunately I'm not. Obama is showing himself to be very much the same kind of politician we're sick of in Washington - misleading and outright lying to the American public on a near daily basis.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

    •  
      identicon
      Anonymous Coward, Mar 11th, 2010 @ 2:42pm

      Re: I wish I could say I was surprised

      I disagree. Obama is not "very much the same kind of politician we're sick of in Washington;" he is worse.

       

      reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

      •  
        icon
        william (profile), Mar 11th, 2010 @ 3:25pm

        Re: Re: I wish I could say I was surprised

        Yup, he's worse because he's actually poison that's sugar coated.

        He's worse because he's doing all these with a straight face while telling you "this change is for the better."

         

        reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

      •  
        icon
        John Fenderson (profile), Mar 13th, 2010 @ 11:01am

        Re: Re: I wish I could say I was surprised

        I disagree. He's much better than any president in my lifetime (I started voting in the Reagan era).

        However, he is a corporatist jsut like all the others. He may be a better poo pile, but he's still a poo pile.

         

        reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

    •  
      icon
      Greevar (profile), Mar 11th, 2010 @ 2:54pm

      Re: I wish I could say I was surprised

      This is different. Bush is an idiot. Obama is incredibly naive.

       

      reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

      •  
        identicon
        Anonymous Coward, Mar 11th, 2010 @ 6:12pm

        Re: Re: I wish I could say I was surprised

        Bush is an idiot and Obama is naive?????

        Don't kid yourself. Bush was not an idiot, and Obama is anything but naive.

        These people are smart, VERY smart. They know exactly what they are doing to this country and this world. They are outright socialist hellbent on controlling every aspect of your life. Idiots and naive men do not become president. Idiocy and naivety are traits of those who call people like Bush and Obama idots and naive.

        A majority of Americans voted for Obama who played them all like instruments. He is a liar, a marxist and might I add not even a natural born citizen. He is a usurper who has woven himself into the most powerful position in the world. I would not call that naive or idiotic. We got duped (actually you folks who voted for him got duped). I saw through him long ago, but then again - I am not naive nor an idiot.

        And Bush - let's call him a less maniacal gentler form of Obama or Clinton. Under the fake guise of compassionate conservatism he committed this country to an unwinnable and so far unending war mired in the most ludicrous of rules of engagement where our men are forced to be little more than security guards for corporate friends of the government, rich and powerful and the Bush family who have been awarded billion dollar no-bid contracts in Iraq under the false pretense of another so-called War on ___________ (fill in the blank). Remember Bush I and the drug war, Bush II has the terror war and while the threat is real, like the current administration says, never waste a good crisis. I wouldn't call a man who is able to do this AND manage to rape the economic system of trillions on his way out of office an idiot.

        No my good sir, the idiot is the American people who have allowed these fradulent, marxist bastards to turn our beloved nation into a cesspool of corruption.

        God Bless the idiots... I hope we wise up soon. Obama is the worst of them yet... He may be the last american president. When he's done, we may be a history book lesson.

         

        reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

        •  
          icon
          vivaelamor (profile), Mar 12th, 2010 @ 4:55pm

          Re: Re: Re: I wish I could say I was surprised

          "Don't kid yourself. Bush was not an idiot, and Obama is anything but naive."

          Sorry, you lost me at 'Bush was not an idiot'.

           

          reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

          •  
            identicon
            Anonymous Coward, Mar 13th, 2010 @ 1:09am

            Re: Re: Re: Re: I wish I could say I was surprised

            yeah well - keep thinking he was and you'll keep getting played like one.

             

            reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

            •  
              icon
              vivaelamor (profile), Mar 13th, 2010 @ 4:32pm

              Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: I wish I could say I was surprised

              "yeah well - keep thinking he was and you'll keep getting played like one."

              No, I'm British. Are you suggesting that there was a positive strategy to George W. Bush consistently showing himself to be awfully dumb? Perhaps you believe that all the gaffs Sarah Palin made were on purpose too?

               

              reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

  •  
    icon
    Paul (profile), Mar 11th, 2010 @ 2:11pm

    So it is official, Obama is a corporate puppet

    This is so stupid. The idea that ACTA is going to *protect American* technology shows a complete disconnect with what is happening in the world.

    We are sending Chinese and Indian Engineers home; we don't want them in the U.S. By 2020, most IP will be developed OUTSIDE the U.S.

    So who understands this? International Corporations. They don't care if their IP is developed in China, India, European, etc. They don't even care if the money flows away from the U.S. They only care that money flows into their bank accounts, in whatever country provides the best tax haven.

    We are not trying to take advantage of the rest of the world with ACTA. We are giving everything away to corporate interests.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

    •  
      icon
      John Mitchell (profile), Mar 11th, 2010 @ 10:25pm

      Re: So it is official, Obama is a corporate puppet

      Paul hit the nail on the head. Global corporate interests could care less whether the profits are counted in the U.S. column or some other country's column, provided they go into their bank accounts and to their shareholders. A huge chunk of so-called "protection" of U.S. economic interests is, in reality, an effort to gain better tools to price discriminate againt American consumers, and sue for some "IP" violation anyone who dares attempt to arbitrage the price differential. ACTA's objectives may mean greater revenues for U.S. corporations, but at the expense of U.S. consumers.

       

      reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

  •  
    identicon
    Anonymous Coward, Mar 11th, 2010 @ 2:22pm

    well a democratic president gave us the DMCA another on will deliver the uber-DMCA.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

  •  
    identicon
    Flakey, Mar 11th, 2010 @ 2:27pm

    If you ever wondered

    If you ever wondered why the people of the US don't trust their government you have to take a single day to look in the latest news.

    This is nothing but a power grab to setup for ISPs to be the bad guy so the IP industries don't have to look so bad. The politicians enabling this sort of mentality are the same ones that are doing other things that in the long run do not help this country.

    I've reached the point that I know it doesn't matter which party is in power. It merely brings a different flavor of the same BS into the forefront. Rarely is what is preached equal to what is planned. What is planned is always out of sight and ever is the devil in the details.

    I myself am ready to see the majority of those sitting in power today throw out the window of the office they inhabit. The same with the two parties they represent.

    I am also ready to see the voice of corporations thrown out too. Since SCOTUS has ruled that money from corporations is their free speech. Even more troubling on that is the fact that most of SCOTUS didn't get it when scolded at the State of the Union address over it.

    This country doesn't much seem to resemble the country of my birth and beyond lip service sure doesn't walk the walk of it.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

    •  
      identicon
      Anonymous Coward, Mar 11th, 2010 @ 2:44pm

      Re: If you ever wondered

      What are "IP industries"?

       

      reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

      •  
        identicon
        Anonymous Coward, Mar 11th, 2010 @ 3:53pm

        Re: Re: If you ever wondered

        IP = intellectual property. IP industries = industries that benefit from intellectual property laws.

         

        reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

      •  
        identicon
        Fred, Mar 11th, 2010 @ 10:18pm

        Re: Re: If you ever wondered

        IP industries are companies that control intellectual property. They rarely create it. And they rarely share much of the profits with those who create it. IP industries are to creators about the way General Mills (making Cheerios) is to farmers who plant or raise oats. Promoting extra profits of IP industries doesn't seem to have a trickle-down effect to increase profits of creators.

         

        reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

        •  
          identicon
          Anonymous Coward, Mar 12th, 2010 @ 5:31am

          Re: Re: Re: If you ever wondered

          Except, nearly all industries "control," to the extent that you can "control," intellectual property. Based on your definition, nearly every manufacturing company in the United States, and most manufacturing companies in the world, are "IP industries." Seems like a vague definition.

          I disagree about creation. Ford creates tons of IP, most of which is used on their cars. Toyota does. Kimberly-Clark does. Rubbermaid does (in fact, Rubbermaid is one of the most inventive companies in existence). GE does. Boeing does. How many do you want? Most manufacturing companies that have intellectual property created it.

           

          reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

  •  
    identicon
    CrushU, Mar 11th, 2010 @ 2:28pm

    Just one word

    *Facepalm*

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

  •  
    identicon
    Trerro, Mar 11th, 2010 @ 2:33pm

    Not sure what to think of Obama at this point

    On one hand, he's gone out of his way to keep science funded, get science education focused on, get the FCC to smack down Comcast's throttling, etc...

    ...but then he pulls crap like this, or the wiretapping thing.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

    •  
      identicon
      Anonymous Coward, Mar 11th, 2010 @ 3:55pm

      Re: Not sure what to think of Obama at this point

      "On one hand, he's gone out of his way to keep science funded"

      and this is even WORSE. He goes out of his way to ensure that CITIZENS fund research with TAXDOLLARS and then to ensure that it all gets lock behind intellectual property walls from the very citizens that funded it.

       

      reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

  •  
    icon
    lux (profile), Mar 11th, 2010 @ 2:35pm

    "Change" was the Democrats main MO in their campaign. They've failed miserably - I consider myself and Independent, but will most definitely be voting AGAINST Dems in any coming election. They get the power, and they don't know what to do with it, typical.

    Full disclosure: I'm from Mass, and voted for Brown. WAKE UP DEMS! You're losing...fast.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

    •  
      identicon
      Anonymous Coward, Mar 11th, 2010 @ 2:45pm

      Re:

      Actually, they have been an initiator of change...FOR THE WORSE.

       

      reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

    •  
      icon
      The Groove Tiger (profile), Mar 11th, 2010 @ 3:00pm

      Re:

      Actually, you should stop voting American at all.

      Find a candidate from Antarctica or something, I heard they're very honest and stuff.

       

      reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

    •  
      identicon
      Anonymous Coward, Mar 11th, 2010 @ 3:19pm

      Re:

      I consider myself and Independent, but will most definitely be voting AGAINST Dems in any coming election.

      Don't vote Republican, either. In other words, don't vote Republicrat.

       

      reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

  •  
    identicon
    Anonymous Coward, Mar 11th, 2010 @ 2:36pm

    meet the new boss, same as the old.. seriously were people really expecting something different

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

  •  
    identicon
    Joe ACTA, Mar 11th, 2010 @ 2:45pm

    What was the slogan again?

    If I recall, the campaign hinged itself on Hope and Change?

    I guess we're Hoping they won't Change things further.

    In a way, he's fulfilling his promise.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

  •  
    icon
    crade (profile), Mar 11th, 2010 @ 3:09pm

    ugh

    If some government somewhere that still believes in governing for the people takes a stand against the corruption that is ACTA, I'm afraid the U.S. will be pushing against them. We don't seem to be doing much better in Canada either.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

  •  
    identicon
    Anonymous Coward, Mar 11th, 2010 @ 3:12pm

    "We must move forawrd on ACTA." President Obama

    ACTA: Anti-Consumer Trade Agreement

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

  •  
    identicon
    NAMELESS.ONE, Mar 11th, 2010 @ 3:31pm

    NO , more no and how is a music tune technology

    ugh the guys a R.E.T.A.R.D
    and

    OBAMA + BIDEN = FORBIDDEN

    go leave NAFTA mister president
    the amount a cash you want for IP we'll match and double that wiht higher oil, resources and products. OH wait you outsourced it all to china so whose goingto build anyhting
    its all over in china now are Americans going to work at mexican rates NOPE...

    so the whole country is going tits up and all this time you thought two trillion dollars would help you nope just him and his buds.

    ACTA
    Anything Cocksuckers Touch Agreement

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

  •  
    identicon
    NUKE intellectual property, Mar 11th, 2010 @ 3:33pm

    and

    WE WELCOME you to pay us FOREVER
    and EVER
    and ever
    AND EVER
    and EVER
    and ever
    AND EVER
    and EVER
    and ever
    AND EVER
    and EVER
    and ever
    AND EVER
    and EVER
    and ever
    AND EVER
    and EVER
    and ever
    AND EVER
    and EVER
    and ever
    AND EVER
    and EVER
    and ever
    AND EVER

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

  •  
    identicon
    ant anti mike, Mar 11th, 2010 @ 3:37pm

    what are we gonna do tonight BRAIN

    THE same thing we do every night pinky....
    were going to IP all over the world

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

  •  
    identicon
    Anonymous Coward, Mar 11th, 2010 @ 3:40pm

    "There's nothing wrong with other people using our technologies, we welcome it -- we just want to make sure that it's licensed, and that American businesses are getting paid appropriately," Obama said. "That's why [the Office of the U.S. Trade Representative] is using the full arsenal of tools available to crack down on practices that blatantly harm our businesses, and that includes negotiating proper protections and enforcing our existing agreements, and moving forward on new agreements, including the proposed Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement."

    Except this is a LIE, the U.S. doesn't innovate, it merely steals innovations from other countries and demands a monopoly on any innovation that any country comes up with without actually innovating itself.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

  •  
    identicon
    One in every crowd, Mar 11th, 2010 @ 3:51pm

    The one thing Obama has done right

    Clearly Obama is pushing for ACTA because it's necessary. Now that America is fading as a manufacturing nation, it's more important than ever that we protect our Intellectual Property, such as movies, music, and software. I know this is the digital age and most people seem to think it's OK to download MP3s and movies from the Internet, but it's actually stealing, the same as if you walked into Target and stuck it in your pocket. It's disgusting that so many Americans today are so corrupt they actually side with foreign thieves against US corporations. THEFT IS THEFT.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

    •  
      identicon
      Anonymous Coward, Mar 11th, 2010 @ 4:00pm

      Re: The one thing Obama has done right

      I can't tell if you're being sarcastic or not.

      "I know this is the digital age and most people seem to think it's OK to download MP3s and movies from the Internet"

      and who appointed you the ultimate authority over morality?

      "but it's actually stealing"

      and you're actually lying. and telling a lie is wrong. So why should I listen to a liar?

       

      reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

    •  
      identicon
      Anonymous Coward, Mar 11th, 2010 @ 4:05pm

      Re: The one thing Obama has done right

      ...most people seem to think it's OK to download MP3s and movies from the Internet, but it's actually stealing, the same as if you walked into Target and stuck it in your pocket.

      And that, my friends, is a big lie.

      THEFT IS THEFT.

      Lying is lying.

       

      reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

    •  
      identicon
      Anonymous Coward, Mar 11th, 2010 @ 4:23pm

      Re: The one thing Obama has done right

      Way to steal an honest troll's argument. You disgust me.

       

      reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

  •  
    identicon
    Anonymous Coward, Mar 11th, 2010 @ 4:12pm

    ffs dont feed the troll

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

  •  
    identicon
    Anonymous Coward, Mar 11th, 2010 @ 5:37pm

    Re: (Ima Fish)

    I have to admit it's pretty clever, in an
    evil and twisted sort of way. Basically he's
    saying, "Even if the world disagrees with
    what we're trying to accomplish with the
    ACTA, we have to keep trying."


    Take a step back further. What it does is legitimize US export of knowledge by business. It allows US business the legal capability to exploit cheap overseas labor.

    And you know what happens when knowledge is exported, right? Over time, you loose the ability to innovate within your own borders because all your inhouse knowledge is exported.

    This is a very bad policy decision for the country. The most worrysome effects may not be apparent right now because everyone's looking to make it cheaper, but in 40 years, it's very, very possible that China and India will leapfrog the US on several fronts.

    Also, consider that the recent change to campaign finance rules weren't a mistake either.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

  •  
    identicon
    NAMELESS.ONE, Mar 11th, 2010 @ 5:46pm

    LET the usa ENACT ACTA and the rest of us wont

    ya screw this shit
    you want acta YOU DO IT first were not as dumb and R.E.T.A.R.D.ed as you are. SO go ahead OBUMA go fer it.

    in 5 years you can openly talk about how well it is.....when no one in the USA is using internet as they all got the boot.

    AND hollywood still didn't make a sale.

    all this causes is more unemployment of the isps more hastles in surveillance of people , and abuses galore

    HEY i know why not just put a camera in everyone's homes OH WAIT the UK IS DOING THIS ALREADY

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

  •  
    identicon
    Anonymous Coward, Mar 11th, 2010 @ 5:55pm

    Re: (Ima Fish)

    I have to admit it's pretty clever, in an
    evil and twisted sort of way. Basically he's
    saying, "Even if the world disagrees with
    what we're trying to accomplish with the
    ACTA, we have to keep trying."


    Take a step back further. What it does is legitimize US export of knowledge by business. It allows US business the legal capability to exploit cheap overseas labor.

    And you know what happens when knowledge is exported, right? Over time, you loose the ability to innovate within your own borders because all your inhouse knowledge is exported.

    This is a very bad policy decision for the country. The most worrysome effects may not be apparent right now because everyone's looking to make it cheaper, but in 40 years, it's very, very possible that China and India will leapfrog the US on several fronts.

    Also, consider that the recent change to campaign finance rules weren't a mistake either.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

  •  
    identicon
    Anonymous Coward, Mar 11th, 2010 @ 6:03pm

    Re: (Ima Fish)

    I have to admit it's pretty clever, in an
    evil and twisted sort of way. Basically he's
    saying, "Even if the world disagrees with
    what we're trying to accomplish with the
    ACTA, we have to keep trying."


    Take a step back further. What it does is legitimize US export of knowledge by business. It allows US business the legal capability to exploit cheap overseas labor.

    And you know what happens when knowledge is exported, right? Over time, you loose the ability to innovate within your own borders because all your inhouse knowledge is exported.

    This is a very bad policy decision for the country. The most worrysome effects may not be apparent right now because everyone's looking to make it cheaper, but in 40 years, it's very, very possible that China and India will leapfrog the US on several fronts.

    Also, consider that the recent change to campaign finance rules weren't a mistake either.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

  •  
    identicon
    Mark, Mar 11th, 2010 @ 8:12pm

    He says, "There's nothing wrong with other people using our technologies, we welcome it -- we just want to make sure that it's licensed, and that American businesses are getting paid appropriately."

    The biggest gaping-hole like problem with this premise is that nobody knows what sort of stuff people are going to invent in the future, so it's impractical for almost any business to support the licensing of any potentially interoperable technology that somebody comes up with. In addition to the inevitable problems of vendor lock-in for the consumer, the longer-term result is that they end up restricting what sort of future technologies get invented.

    Any act or amendment which prohibits a consumer from doing anything that they like for themselves with *ANY* material that they have legally acquired, or otherwise makes it impractical for a consumer to do so by outlawing the technologies that he or she might utilize to accomplish those ends, should be torn up, shredded, or burned. Which pretty much sums up how I feel about some of the proposals in ACTA.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

  •  
    identicon
    Mark, Mar 11th, 2010 @ 8:14pm

    He says, "There's nothing wrong with other people using our technologies, we welcome it -- we just want to make sure that it's licensed, and that American businesses are getting paid appropriately."

    The biggest gaping-hole like problem with this premise is that nobody knows what sort of stuff people are going to invent in the future, so it's impractical for almost any business to support the licensing of any potentially interoperable technology that somebody comes up with. In addition to the inevitable problems of vendor lock-in for the consumer, the longer-term result is that they end up restricting what sort of future technologies get invented.

    Any act or amendment which prohibits a consumer from doing anything that they like for themselves with *ANY* material that they have legally acquired, or otherwise makes it impractical for a consumer to do so by outlawing the technologies that he or she might utilize to accomplish those ends, should be torn up, shredded, or burned. Which pretty much sums up how I feel about some of the proposals in ACTA.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

  •  
    identicon
    What comes around, Mar 12th, 2010 @ 6:24am

    One in every crowd

    America has some of the strongest patent laws in the world. As a nation we respect IP, which is why we invented the computer chip, the Internet, and most of the other technology we're using to communicate on this messageg board, not to mention the vaccine for Polio, the telephone, nylon, and the airplane. If a nation DOES NOT respect IP its corporations and citizens will have little reason to invent and they will be essentially sterile, which is exactly the problem China has today. If America wants to remain the technological leader in the world we cannot become a nation of thieves. Previous generations were not, and we all benefit from the fruits of their honesty today. Unfortunately, it looks like the young generation today is greedy and evil and determined to steal what does not belong to them. The future does not look bright.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

    •  
      icon
      Hephaestus (profile), Mar 12th, 2010 @ 7:17am

      Re: One in every crowd

      You are to funny ...

      "As a nation we respect IP, which is why we invented the computer chip,"

      IP law had nothing to do with the creation of computer chip. People didnt think hey we have patent law lets invent the computer chip. The printing press was invented with out patents. The wheel was invented with out patents. The oil lamp was invented with out patents.

      Patents have nothing to do with invention just protecting that invention for a limited time.

       

      reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

    •  
      icon
      Mike Masnick (profile), Mar 12th, 2010 @ 11:11am

      Re: One in every crowd

      Trying to figure out if this comment is parody. Thinking it must be.

      America has some of the strongest patent laws in the world. As a nation we respect IP, which is why we invented the computer chip

      Uh, nope. The computer chip was invented because there was a need for more advanced computing machines. Nothing to do with patents.

      the Internet

      Developed without patents.

      the vaccine for Polio

      Jonas Salk refused to patent, saying "There is no patent. Could you patent the sun?"

      the telephone

      While there were patents on the telephone, it is acknowledged that the patent actually went to the wrong person, and thus actually kept the real inventor out of the market.

      nylon

      Invented by a guy who was focused on pure scientific research, and was only patented later at the insistence of his employer...

      the airplane

      Whose patents had to basically be anulled by the gov't for blocking necessary competition during WWI.

      Given that every example you gave disproves your point, I'm pretty sure your post is satire.

      If a nation DOES NOT respect IP its corporations and citizens will have little reason to invent and they will be essentially sterile, which is exactly the problem China has today.

      Ok. Confirmed. This is satire.

       

      reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

  •  
    icon
    Hephaestus (profile), Mar 12th, 2010 @ 7:09am

    After reading through the leaked documents I realized something very interesting. ACTA has secondary liability buried in it. Secondary liability is where a parent is held responsible for their childs actions, or in the case the ISPs are held responsible for the actions of their subscribers. ACTA has Three strikes built into it. You are accused three times of file sharing you loose your internet access. ACTA has the potential for criminal liabilities for what in now infringement.

    In china they have secondary liability which is how they control the internet. The control they have is done by having the rules vague and making the ISPs guess at what should be restricted. This leads to many things of a controversial nature being removed out of fear. In South Korea they have implemented this also which has lead to a marked decrease in new services available on line, and the removal of old services out of fear of lawsuit.

    The copyright clause of the constitution reads "To promote the Progress of Science and useful Arts, by securing for limited Times to Authors and Inventors the exclusive Right to their respective Writings and Discoveries." This extension of Patent and copyright law doesnt accomplish this it does the opposite.

    Is this where we want to go in this nation? Do we want people to be held reponsible for the actions of others? Do we want people to be guilty until proven innocent? Do we want people getting kicked off line based on accusations and not due process? Do we want ISPs to monitor our every move and action online with out a warrant, searching for infringing material on behalf of corporations?

    This is ACTA. This is your future.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

  •  
    icon
    Hephaestus (profile), Mar 12th, 2010 @ 7:39am

    Things that make you go hmmmm .....

    Okay time to Think Outside The Box again ... GRIN ... unintended consequences are wonderful things.

    I have a proposal for the ISP's when three strikes gets implemented in the united states. (sound of shoe dropping - stage left)

    The pitch to the ISPs goes something like this ...
    You are an ISP with 1 million customers, 50% plus infringe on copyright on a daily basis. 20% of them have at least one strike. Do you want to loose those customers? We would like to introduce you to the wonderful world of the creative commons. It wont cost you any money and will protect your customer base. It requires you to just add a few words to your warning letters.

    "You are a valued customer and we would hate to loose you. There are other sorces for music and videos. We have put together a list of free alternatives. URL goes here"

    Mentioning big name stars that are going the free route NIN, etc would be a big selling point.

    (sound of shoe dropping - stage right)

    This is an opportunity that can make alot of money for alot of people. Just not the labels, and movie-tv studios.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

  •  
    identicon
    ohio, Mar 12th, 2010 @ 9:18am

    Re: "and might I add not even a natural born citizen. "

    He is a Natural Born Citizen due to his birth in Hawaii, which has been confirmed twice by the two top officials of the Department of Health of Hawaii, who are members of a Republican governor's administration.

    His father's citizenship at the time of birth has no effect on Natural Born Status, which is defined as:

    “Natural born citizen. Persons who are born within the jurisdiction of a national government, i.e. in its territorial limits, or those born of citizens temporarily residing abroad.” — Black’s Law Dictionary, Sixth Edition

    Obama is a Natural Born Citizen because he was born under the jurisdiction of the United States of America, in the state of Hawaii.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

  •  
    identicon
    alternatives(), Mar 12th, 2010 @ 11:34am

    Just walk away.

    Folks - just walk away. Stop consuming the "IP" of the media companies. Turn off the TV - stop listening to the radio.

    Develop the habit of not wanting their products.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

    •  
      icon
      vivaelamor (profile), Mar 12th, 2010 @ 5:27pm

      Re: Just walk away.

      'Folks - just walk away. Stop consuming the "IP" of the media companies. Turn off the TV - stop listening to the radio.'

      What do you think that would achieve? They make up their statistics half the time anyway. They don't record most of what goes on with alternative media at all.

      You're going to have to try a lot harder than that to get me to stop listening to Aretha Franklin; Miranda Sex Garden; Ida Maria; Eva Cassidy; K.D. Lang; X-Ray Spex; Tracy Chapman; Norah Jones; Siouxsie & the Banshees; Ida Maria; Vanessa Mae; and The Pretenders, to name a few.

      The product isn't always the problem, if ever there were a use for the awful phrase: 'don't throw the baby out with the bathwater'.

       

      reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

  •  
    identicon
    Moonshine, Apr 2nd, 2010 @ 4:48pm

    Such BS. We all know how far past the ACTA goes. And why are the soo concerned with opening it to the public?

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]


Add Your Comment

Have a Techdirt Account? Sign in now. Want one? Register here
Get Techdirt’s Daily Email
Save me a cookie
  • Note: A CRLF will be replaced by a break tag (<br>), all other allowable HTML will remain intact
  • Allowed HTML Tags: <b> <i> <a> <em> <br> <strong> <blockquote> <hr> <tt>
Follow Techdirt
A word from our sponsors...
Essential Reading
Techdirt Reading List
Techdirt Insider Chat
A word from our sponsors...
Recent Stories
A word from our sponsors...

Close

Email This