Danish Anti-Piracy Group Withdraws All Its Lawsuits Against Individuals (After Losing Most Anyway)

from the nice-work dept

While the RIAA has backed down (but not stopped) lawsuits against those accused of file sharing in the US, it looks like the Danish anti-piracy bureau has decided to drop all of its lawsuits after it became clear that individuals were basically winning them all (Google translation of the original, found via brokep). Basically, the courts acquitted most of the individuals accused of private file sharing, with the one exception being the case where the guy confessed. And, the nature of the rulings in the acquittals made it clear that it was virtually impossible to win a lawsuit against individuals for file sharing. Of course, we have no doubt that the industry will continue to use other means, such as via regulatory capture, to continue to look for ways not to give consumers what they want.


Reader Comments (rss)

(Flattened / Threaded)

  1.  
    identicon
    Sheinen, Nov 9th, 2009 @ 3:22am

    Like I always say, Plausible Deniability is the best defence against any accusation.

    'You slept with my mum!' "Eurgh, who would do that?"
    'You stole my biscuit!1 "I don't like biscuits!"
    'You downloaded my film' " I don't know what the internet is..."

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  2.  
    identicon
    cc, Nov 9th, 2009 @ 3:22am

    Not to worry! The RIAA will call in its assassinations division, and all will be well again.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  3.  
    identicon
    Anonymous Coward, Nov 9th, 2009 @ 3:51am

    continue to look for ways not to give consumers what they want.

    By this I am assuming you mean "a free lunch"?

    Sorry, but if this is an indication of what consumers want, the music business (and movies) might as well shut down now, because apparently nobody wants to buy anything anymore.

    I wonder if they will just completely move out of the Danish market? It's small, few would miss it.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  4.  
    identicon
    Cynix, Nov 9th, 2009 @ 3:54am

    By this I am assuming you mean "a free lunch"? says AC.

    Hey, our resident troll is back!

    How about giving yourself a name, coward?

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  5.  
    identicon
    Cynix Ugly Dog, Nov 9th, 2009 @ 3:55am

    Re:

    Who needs a name? Debate ideas, not people.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  6.  
    identicon
    Cynix, Nov 9th, 2009 @ 4:07am

    Re: Re:

    Yup, too chicken. Thought so.

    Why don't you post your "ideas" on the forum under each article over at www.p2pnet.net and see how far you get?

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  7.  
    icon
    fogbugzd (profile), Nov 9th, 2009 @ 4:08am

    What next?

    It will be interesting to see what happens next. My guess is that nothing significant will happen. It would make no sense at all for recording companies to pull out of the Danish market; they can still sell music as they always have. There probably will not be a drop in music sales unless the recording industry does something dumb or tries to manipulate the market to show how much piracy damages the market.

    Piracy rates may go up, but that is not significant economically as long as music sales stay at the same levels as countries with more aggressive lawsuits. The music industry outside the traditional recording industry will probably improve because it is now easier to be a music fan.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  8.  
    identicon
    p2pnet sucks, Nov 9th, 2009 @ 4:34am

    Re: Re: Re:

    It doesn't matter - they would debate the person and not the ideas. Quite simply, they are too closed minded, and too busy trying to figure out what to have for their next free lunch.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  9.  
    icon
    Richard (profile), Nov 9th, 2009 @ 5:13am

    Re:

    I wonder if they will just completely move out of the Danish market? It's small, few would miss it.

    And then all their stuff will be distributed for free (or by commercial pirates) to everyone in Denmark - including those who would have paid for it.

    So the 'AA's would basically be just abandoning a revenue stream for nothing - looks like a really smart move.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  10.  
    icon
    Chronno S. Trigger (profile), Nov 9th, 2009 @ 5:29am

    Re:

    As another AC (hell, maybe it was you) noted, it's not as big of a problem as we see. It's on Techdirt almost every day, we see it because we know tech and we know how to do it. But, it's been shown that plenty of people are willing to pay for what they like as shown by the growing music industry and the box office hits like Star Trek and The Dark Knight.

    If these people would stop their petty bickering and embrace the gift that was laid before them, it could allow people who are boycotting them to come back and let the people who don't want to make that initial investment to see what they like. They may not be the big fish in the little pond any more but they would still be the same size fish and allow them to grow (like goldfish).

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  11.  
    icon
    Richard (profile), Nov 9th, 2009 @ 5:29am

    Re:

    Sorry, but if this is an indication of what consumers want, the music business (and movies) might as well shut down now, because apparently nobody wants to buy anything anymore.


    Well maybe that is what consumers want - and if so there is nothing you can do about it - you cannot force people to buy stuff.

    If they do shut down then replacements will spring up that have business models that can survive in the present market.

    That's just market economics for you. The only alternative is state control.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  12.  
    icon
    Overcast (profile), Nov 9th, 2009 @ 6:06am

    continue to look for ways not to give consumers what they want.

    By this I am assuming you mean "a free lunch"?

    Sorry, but if this is an indication of what consumers want, the music business (and movies) might as well shut down now, because apparently nobody wants to buy anything anymore.


    Like..

    What radio did to the music industry?

    Yes... so sad :(

    I remember back in the 70's and 80's paying for radio - don't you?

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  13.  
    icon
    Overcast (profile), Nov 9th, 2009 @ 6:09am

    Oh and BTW - I downloaded some Radiohead - never really cared much for them - I had really only heard Creep on the radio.

    After hearing some of their other stuff...

    I'm heading to Amazon now to buy some of their CD's - that's what I do with groups I really like - I go buy the CD's.

    If I wouldn't have heard them - for free - I wouldn't be buying any of their stuff.

    The radio didn't cut it. Even though - wow, it was 'free' too.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  14.  
    identicon
    Anonymous Coward, Nov 9th, 2009 @ 6:09am

    Well, on the one hand I'm happy that they're finally seeing these lawsuits as a tremendous financial burden and mostly a sucker's game, but on the other I worry that it's just going to lead back down the path to "graduated response" (so named, I presume, because the idea that media businesses have a justifiable authority to ask for it is pompous and the evidence is circumstantial).Civil suits against individuals are supposed to be their only recourse, no matter how doomed they are.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  15.  
    icon
    Lisa (profile), Nov 9th, 2009 @ 6:32am

    Re: Re: Re: Re:

    If you're the same AC I think you are(very likely), then accusing p2p net of argumentum ad hominem is the pot calling the kettle black.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  16.  
    identicon
    Lisa Sees Everything, Nov 9th, 2009 @ 6:50am

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    Lisa, it's surprising you can see the kettle, considering it is past the end of your nose :)

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  17.  
    icon
    Lisa (profile), Nov 9th, 2009 @ 7:11am

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    Wow. Thanks for proving my point.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  18.  
    icon
    Kyote (profile), Nov 9th, 2009 @ 11:12am

    Re: Re:

    >The only alternative is state control.

    I don't agree with this. sharing is here and from all that I know about computers, which admittedly isn't everything, by any means, it cannot be stopped.

    Already there are a some creating encrypted p2p networks and experimenting with private vpn's.

    Even if somehow the *aa's stop that, which I doubt even more, another way will come up, and another etc...

    As MM says, the old model is dead/dying. Either adapt or dye. Someone will fill the need and life will go on, as it always has.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  19.  
    identicon
    Anonymous Coward, Nov 9th, 2009 @ 12:30pm

    Re:

    Sorry, but if this is an indication of what consumers want, the music business (and movies) might as well shut down now, because apparently nobody wants to buy anything anymore.

    As much as their shills may want to pretend otherwise, the "record business" in not the "music business". The music business is doing fine and people are buying lots of stuff.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  20.  
    identicon
    Lawrence D'Oliveiro, Nov 9th, 2009 @ 2:04pm

    Uploading or Downloading?

    It’s not clear from the item whether the lawsuits were for uploading or downloading. Downloading would be very hard to prove, but surely evidence for uploading can be gathered the same way it has been done elsewhere.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]


Add Your Comment

Have a Techdirt Account? Sign in now. Want one? Register here
Get Techdirt’s Daily Email
Save me a cookie
  • Note: A CRLF will be replaced by a break tag (<br>), all other allowable HTML will remain intact
  • Allowed HTML Tags: <b> <i> <a> <em> <br> <strong> <blockquote> <hr> <tt>
Follow Techdirt
A word from our sponsors...
Essential Reading
Techdirt Reading List
Techdirt Insider Chat
A word from our sponsors...
Recent Stories
A word from our sponsors...

Close

Email This