EFF Launches Takedown Hall Of Shame

from the who-will-be-inducted-next? dept

With so many organizations trying to use copyright and trademark law to take content offline, the EFF is announcing the launch of its new Takedown Hall Of Shame, highlighting "the most egregious examples of takedown abuse." You'll recognize the names on the list -- as every one of them we've written about here. Who knows if this will cause lawyers to think twice before issuing bogus takedowns (I doubt it), but at least it should shine some light on how widely copyright and trademark law are abused to stifle speech.


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    ChurchHatesTucker (profile), Oct 27th, 2009 @ 6:09pm

    And every year...

    ...they could have an award show and present the Streisand.

     

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    bob, Oct 27th, 2009 @ 6:59pm

    The EFF Needs

    To ad condescension and mockery, like the pirate bay.

     

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    Anonymous Coward, Oct 27th, 2009 @ 7:38pm

    Any bets on how long until they are issued a takedown?

     

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      Anonymous Coward, Oct 27th, 2009 @ 7:56pm

      Re:

      Then the takedown would make it on the list.

      I presume that those who would be asserting the takedown know that it likely won't work. But still, there are many stupid entities out there that might try one. These days you never know.

       

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    Anonymous Coward, Oct 27th, 2009 @ 8:55pm

    17 USC 512(f) imposes sanctions for persons submitting takedown notices. Specifically, the section reads:

    (f) Misrepresentations.— Any person who knowingly materially misrepresents under this section—

    (1) that material or activity is infringing, or

    (2) that material or activity was removed or disabled by mistake or misidentification,

    shall be liable for any damages, including costs and attorneys’ fees, incurred by the alleged infringer, by any copyright owner or copyright owner’s authorized licensee, or by a service provider, who is injured by such misrepresentation, as the result of the service provider relying upon such misrepresentation in removing or disabling access to the material or activity claimed to be infringing, or in replacing the removed material or ceasing to disable access to it.


    There is a price to be paid for truly "bogus" notices, as has been noted and imposed in at least OPG v. Diebold, a copy of which can be found at:

    http://www.eff.org/files/filenode/OPG_v_Diebold/OPG%20v.%20Diebold%20ruling.pdf

    BTW, DMCA takedowns are properly limited to copyright law. Any such notice that is filed based upon trademark law is clearly outside the reach of the DMCA.

     

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      Anonymous Coward, Oct 27th, 2009 @ 9:08pm

      Re:

      "BTW, DMCA takedowns are properly limited to copyright law. Any such notice that is filed based upon trademark law is clearly outside the reach of the DMCA."

      I suppose this is how they get around the sanctions and are still able to either make others pay money in settlements or threaten to make them endure a long and expensive lawsuit, even if the entities being sued would eventually win.

       

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    jilocasin, Oct 28th, 2009 @ 6:55am

    Perhaps EFF is hoping for a DMCA takedown notice?

    Perhaps that's just what the EFF is hoping for, some silly entity to serve them with a bogus DMCA take down notice.

    Since they received it, they would immediately be a party to it. They could show the world how they feel a take down notice _should_ be handled. As a bonus, since they obviously think the items they host were recipients of bogus take down requests in order for them to post it themselves, they can sue for damages and help establish the case law to allow others to easily successfully sue overzealous entities.

    From the EFF's point of view it's a win/win.

     

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    Vic, Oct 28th, 2009 @ 8:45am

    Good for them! Long due...

     

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    Gene Cavanaugh, Oct 28th, 2009 @ 9:04am

    Who knows if this will cause lawyers to think twice before issuing bogus takedowns

    So, using this reasoning, a waiter in your favorite restaurant should refuse to serve you if you order something that isn't healthy (or he/she simply doesn't approve of)? A taxi driver should refuse to pick up a fare because the roads are crowded? A plumber should refuse to fix your sink because he/she doesn't approve of your sewer system?
    GET REAL! An attorney works for hire - the HIRING ENTITY is the culprit!

     

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      Derek Reed, Oct 28th, 2009 @ 9:11am

      Re: Who knows if this will cause lawyers to think twice before issuing bogus takedowns

      Following your analogy, I think it'd be more like the waiter refusing to serve you sludge from the sewer system, or the plumber refusing to mop up the shit you took in the kitchen. You can abstain the lawyers from all responsibility, there's some shit on their hands too.

       

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    jason motley, Oct 28th, 2009 @ 10:31am

    take this down

    I own the trademark for hall of shame and I demand that you you pay me $100,000,000,000 USD or remove this site. you have 48 hours to let me know your answer.

     

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    Anonymous Coward, Feb 24th, 2013 @ 1:57am

     

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