First Pretexting Charges Filed, But What About The Companies Giving Out The Info?

from the looking-in-the-wrong-place dept

The first charges under the federal pretexting law have been filed by authorities in Ohio. The law came about after the 2006 scandal in which HP spied on some of its board members and reporters, in part by calling their mobile operators and posing as the members to access their calling records (a method referred to as "pretexting"). After the high-profile case, politicians responded to calls to "do something" by putting the law into place. This worked out well for the mobile operators, which were able to avoid much scrutiny over how or why they released the info in the first place. The operators spun pretexting as a governmental problem, and sought to play down the fact that they were actually the ones giving out info to people they shouldn't. So kudos to the operators for being able to continue to so deftly stay out of the spotlight of scrutiny for what are, essentially, data leaks.


Reader Comments (rss)

(Flattened / Threaded)

  •  
    identicon
    AJ, Jan 14th, 2009 @ 6:26am

    concern

    I work in the telecom field and we hear a lot about pretexting. I know my company has taken extraordinary steps to inform our customer service people about it and require authentication before they release any information.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]


Add Your Comment

Have a Techdirt Account? Sign in now. Want one? Register here
Get Techdirt’s Daily Email
Save me a cookie
  • Note: A CRLF will be replaced by a break tag (<br>), all other allowable HTML will remain intact
  • Allowed HTML Tags: <b> <i> <a> <em> <br> <strong> <blockquote> <hr> <tt>
Follow Techdirt
A word from our sponsors...
Essential Reading
Techdirt Reading List
Techdirt Insider Chat
A word from our sponsors...
Recent Stories
A word from our sponsors...

Close

Email This