Court Rules That Your Text Messages Are Private

from the good-for-them dept

A few months ago, we noted that New York City was demanding text messages sent by some people as part of an investigation. This was just the latest in a long line of requests for text messages, where questions have been raised about whether or not those messages should be considered private. Now, a court in the 9th circuit has said that there's a reasonable expectation of privacy on text messages, and a company revealing them without consent from either the sender or the recipient represents a violation of the Fourth Amendment.


Reader Comments (rss)

(Flattened / Threaded)

  1.  
    identicon
    Riggs, Jun 18th, 2008 @ 7:21pm

    Well they tap phone lines of suspects... why should they be disallowed to do the same with text messages?

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  2.  
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    Blog Marketing Journal, Jun 18th, 2008 @ 7:34pm

    Interesting - you'd think they would be able to be used in cases? Aren't emails?

     

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  3.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Jun 18th, 2008 @ 9:59pm

    Poor Kwame.

    Too bad that defense didn't work for Detroit Mayor Kwame Kilpatrick...

     

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  4.  
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    Raymond, Jun 18th, 2008 @ 11:30pm

    Emails??

    i do believe emails can be used in cases, now with that being said, text messages these days, are they not simplified emails anymore??? im not saying that text messages should be monitored, but my point being, text messages should be able to be used in a case

     

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  5.  
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    Joe Bloggs, Jun 18th, 2008 @ 11:41pm

    Did i really send that?!

    @Raymond

    Ah! But can the court prove beyond reasonable doubt that I sent the message, or that someone used my phone while i wasn't looking...

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  6.  
    identicon
    Michael G., Jun 19th, 2008 @ 12:12am

    Relax...

    No, all that they are saying is it's still admissible but it's going to require a court order before it can be presented, not a big deal. Email fell into that same category last year.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  7.  
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    Paul, Jun 19th, 2008 @ 2:43am

    sms is dying

    it is just pushing people toward running secure and encrypted IM applications over tcp on their phones instead of sms which is still archaically a metered service.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  8.  
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    Originate, Jun 19th, 2008 @ 8:12am

    Re:

    It isn't any different. A warrant supersedes any privacy rights you may have.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  9.  
    identicon
    Originate, Jun 19th, 2008 @ 8:13am

    Re:

    Once again, this obviously does not include what your rights may or may not be after a warrant is obtained.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  10.  
    identicon
    Originate, Jun 19th, 2008 @ 8:14am

    Re: Did i really send that?!

    That defense doesn't even work against the RIAA in copyright infringement cases. What makes you think it would work for something more serious?

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  11.  
    identicon
    HFC, Jun 20th, 2008 @ 8:30am

    For More Info...

    For a bit more in depth analysis of this ruling visit CLCT's blog.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  12.  
    identicon
    Billy Bob Buck, Jul 1st, 2008 @ 6:19pm

    privacy of e-mails

    Didn't y'all notice? That decision was laid down by the 9th District Court of Appeals. They are the most LIBERAL, most KOOKY, and the most overturned (by the U S Supreme Court) of any district court in our fair land. Shucks, those guys are loopy. So y'all just forget what them "judges" say, and watch yur email!

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  13.  
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    Ladonna F., Aug 15th, 2009 @ 5:21pm

    I had an employee read my messages to my boss-do you still think that is a violation of the fourth ammendment? Any suggestions on how to handle this matter-I still work there?

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  14.  
    identicon
    Jane, Jan 7th, 2010 @ 9:59pm

    Re: Did i really send that?!

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  15.  
    identicon
    Jane, Jan 7th, 2010 @ 10:02pm

    Re: Did i really send that?!

    if you say you didn't send it,they can't prove beyond reasonable doubt, don't ever admit it.How can they prove it, i question it myself?? Anyone no for sure??

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  16.  
    identicon
    eric, Jul 24th, 2010 @ 7:03am

    text message

    Well I have a question, I wa the subject of a drug sting. I know a littleoff the wall, do not worry they are all my scripts. The cops picked up a friend of mine walking down the street and said she matched a runaway, she is 26. the cops jusmped 1 took her phone 1 her purse other her. Went through the phone and she "I guess sent my wife a text askinh for something. The cops arrestedher for Obbstruction of justice. so she showed them my house where they proceded to enter my back dioor and put a gun tomy 8 month preg wife, she thought we were getting robbed. well they walked upto me and grabed myphone and propped up at my dest . I told him were my scripts were so they wouldn't destroy my house.
    PLease lead me in the right direction, Thank you all my long lost friends.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  17.  
    identicon
    Anonymous Coward, Apr 10th, 2011 @ 9:03am

    can please go through the texts and photos of a lost phone or is that protected from the 4th amendment

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]


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