MPAA Takes University Toolkit Offline For GPL Violation

from the whoops dept

Remember last week how the MPAA was pushing a ridiculous toolkit on universities that was officially supposed to help universities track network usage, but also had the side-effect of potentially exposing all sorts of private info? Well, some folks noticed that the toolkit was built on open source technologies, such as Ubuntu Linux, though the MPAA (irony alert) didn't appear to be abiding by the GPL license associated with the software. It didn't take long for an Ubuntu developer to send a takedown notice, forcing the university to remove the toolkit. The developer contacted the MPAA concerning the violations, and found that the group ignored him (shocking, I know, for a group that claims it's such a huge supporter of intellectual property rights). So, he was forced to go to the ISP hosting the content, which finally resulted in the MPAA pulling the software down. This isn't the first time, by the way, that the MPAA has decided that it was okay to ignore intellectual property rules when it suits the organization, but it does suggest that for all its talk of having a principled stand on the issue, it's all a bunch of hogwash.


Reader Comments (rss)

(Flattened / Threaded)

  •  
    identicon
    TheDock22, Dec 4th, 2007 @ 10:13am

    Hah!

    Hurray for the Open Source community! The MPAA needs a serious reality check.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

  •  
    identicon
    I Hate Idiots, Dec 4th, 2007 @ 10:14am

    MPAA Takes University Toolkit Offline For GPL Viol

    M - Methodicaly
    P - Proving
    A - Associations are full of
    A - A$$hats

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

  •  
    identicon
    Casper, Dec 4th, 2007 @ 10:16am

    Duh

    There is nothing about the MPAA/RIAA that has anything to do with preserving intellectual rights. They are profit driven organizations with the sole purpose of revenue.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

  •  
    identicon
    ehrichweiss, Dec 4th, 2007 @ 10:21am

    well..

    That just takes irony to a whole new level.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

  •  
    identicon
    Anonymous of Course, Dec 4th, 2007 @ 10:30am

    Stooges and Goons

    The MPAA/RIAA prove once more that they're
    a shakedown organization. Their bullying
    and extortion tactics knows no bounds.
    Is it any wonder they ignored the GPL?

    The really troubling part is the government
    aiding them. Oh, wait... I guess that's
    no surprise either. Just another means of
    shearing the sheep.

    The only difference between organized crime
    and the government is that you get better odds
    when betting on the illegal numbers games.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

  •  
    identicon
    John M, Dec 4th, 2007 @ 10:31am

    I'd just like to see lawsuits against these associations in hopes that maybe a little backlash would open their eyes a bit.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

  •  
    identicon
    bob, Dec 4th, 2007 @ 10:40am

    The interesting thing is that there are several Linux distributions that do what this toolkit was claiming to. The MPAA could have merely linked to any one of them. But then that would have made sense (and also would not have fed any information back to them).

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

  •  
    identicon
    Anonymous Coward, Dec 4th, 2007 @ 11:22am

    when can we just make techdirt the justice dept on these types of issues?

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

  •  
    identicon
    Anonymous Coward, Dec 4th, 2007 @ 11:42am

    ...

    fucking back stabers

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

  •  
    identicon
    Anonymous Coward, Dec 4th, 2007 @ 12:27pm

    The ISP

    It's interesting to note that rather than immediately taking the entire site down as ISPs usually do, the ISP in this case, ware.net, apparently contacted the MPAA and allowed them to remove just the infringing item instead. I thought ISPs were required to immediately remove infringing content. But if not, then why is that what they usually do? I admit that I am not familiar with all the details of the DMCA.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

  •  
    identicon
    ehrichweiss, Dec 4th, 2007 @ 1:04pm

    they need "damages"

    Maybe it's time to take the same licensing that Phrack Magazine used to have(and maybe still does if it's still being published) where any private individual can read it for free but if you are using it for government/corporate objectives then there needs to be a license paid(I think it was $495 per issue or something to that effect). AFAIK there is nothing that prevents this type of license from being legally binding so twisting the stipulation to be "if you use it without honoring the license there is a $5,000,000 fee per copy" or the like could make for some interesting times in that regard.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

  •  
    identicon
    cb, Dec 4th, 2007 @ 1:04pm

    It's not hogwash, but bullshit.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

  •  
    identicon
    John, Dec 5th, 2007 @ 4:06am

    It's over...

    Can't believe the MPAA/RIAA are still around. People are massively adopting private and encrypted filesharing apps that keep them miles away from the radar. There's plenty of free systems out there that are great for sharing huge files and specific folders on your diskdrive, an example being GigaTribe: http://www.gigatribe.com

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

  •  
    identicon
    M.R. in L.A., Dec 9th, 2007 @ 3:21am

    The MPAA/RIAA doesn't really care if an artist/creator gets ripped-off. But they're really pissed off when someone other than themselves does it. "Dot rip-off the artist - that's our job!"

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]


Add Your Comment

Have a Techdirt Account? Sign in now. Want one? Register here
Get Techdirt’s Daily Email
Save me a cookie
  • Note: A CRLF will be replaced by a break tag (<br>), all other allowable HTML will remain intact
  • Allowed HTML Tags: <b> <i> <a> <em> <br> <strong> <blockquote> <hr> <tt>
Follow Techdirt
A word from our sponsors...
Essential Reading
Techdirt Reading List
Techdirt Insider Chat
A word from our sponsors...
Recent Stories
A word from our sponsors...

Close

Email This