New Anti-Spyware Coalition Hopes To Be Less Useless Than The Last One

from the sounds-familiar dept

Just a few months after an anti-spyware coalition fell apart after it admitted known malware creators to the group, a new group has formed that promises it won't meet the same fate. They say the original group tried to do too much -- though, really the problem was just that they let the fox into the hen house. In the meantime, this more "narrowly focused" group plans to start out by "defining spyware." Good luck. People (politicians, mainly) have been trying to define spyware for quite some time, without much luck. The problem with defining such things is that you never know what the unintended consequences are -- and there are some actions that may be perfectly legit in some programs, but a serious problem in others. It's still not clear why existing fraud laws can't cover the problems caused by most malware. Besides, as we've seen with CAN SPAM, it wouldn't be surprising if many malware makers figure out ways to follow the letter of the law, but not the spirit -- or, failing that, to ignore it completely.


Reader Comments (rss)

(Flattened / Threaded)

  1.  
    identicon
    Paul Hoffman, Jun 3rd, 2005 @ 4:30pm

    Maybe don't define spyware

    Because defining "spyware" seems like an endless pit, maybe it is better to define the part of "spyware" that people hate the most. At the Cybersecurity Association, we will be testing for "malware" instead of "spyware", and have come up with a defintion that covers most of what angers users and makes the malware unsafe.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  2.  
    identicon
    Joey, Jun 17th, 2009 @ 7:40pm

    I got help from http://the-spyware-removal-guide.blogspot.com/. They list a bunch of free programs that did the job.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]


Add Your Comment

Have a Techdirt Account? Sign in now. Want one? Register here
Get Techdirt’s Daily Email
Save me a cookie
  • Note: A CRLF will be replaced by a break tag (<br>), all other allowable HTML will remain intact
  • Allowed HTML Tags: <b> <i> <a> <em> <br> <strong> <blockquote> <hr> <tt>
Follow Techdirt
A word from our sponsors...
Essential Reading
Techdirt Reading List
Techdirt Insider Chat
A word from our sponsors...
Recent Stories
A word from our sponsors...

Close

Email This