Counterfeit Globalism

from the and-so-it-goes dept

While people argue over the good and bad aspects of globalism, the world doesn't wait -- but it also doesn't always follow the expected path. Bruce Sterling's latest piece for Wired Magazine includes a look at the underground economy in Belgrade, which he describes as black globalization -- an odd mixture of globalization and the black market. That is, despite an opening of global corporations to the area, the real business is being done by counterfeiters who do brisk business selling fake everything. While Sterling pitches this as some new economic model, that's not entirely clear. Counterfeit products have always been popular (ever been offered the opportunity to buy a Rolex on the streets of NYC?). Counterfeit products have been popular in plenty of places. The thing that Sterling seems to find so interesting, though, is the fascination with brand over actual product. People buy fake Nikes, even though they're going to fall apart. It's not so much for the shoe, he implies, as for the brand and this entrance into the global counterfeit marketplace.


Reader Comments (rss)

(Flattened / Threaded)

  1.  
    identicon
    Lindsay, Mar 8th, 2005 @ 1:53pm

    Caveat Emptor

    if a deal sounds too good to be true - it most definitly is...

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  2.  
    identicon
    dorpus, Mar 8th, 2005 @ 2:58pm

    Shades of Grey

    In India, kids can buy nicotine-laced candy for a few cents a piece. What if you could buy nicotine-laced chocolate bars? Globalization will likely lead to increased grey-area choices too -- if given a choice, wouldn't most people prefer semi-legal or poorly enforced drugs over obviously illegal ones?

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]


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