FCC Swamped By Number Portability Complaints

from the not-so-smooth dept

By this point, it's pretty well known that wireless number portability didn't go so smoothly over the past couple of months. However, now the FCC has admitted the extent of the problems, saying that they've received 4,750 complaints concerning number portability. Considering the total number of switchers, that's really not a huge percentage - but it still doesn't speak well to the efforts the wireless carriers put into the process. The FCC is now looking to see if any regulations were broken. Considering that many carriers were clearly dragging their feet on getting ready for this (partly as a ploy to ask for more delays), it seems likely that the FCC will fine a few carriers for screwing around when they should have been preparing (as we expected back in May). It still seems like a strategically backwards move not to have embraced something that customers clearly wanted - and which was clearly going to come sooner or later.


Reader Comments (rss)

(Flattened / Threaded)

  1.  
    identicon
    Bob Dole, Jan 29th, 2004 @ 6:27am

    math

    4734 complaints over 60 days is 79 per day. Out of fifty states, that's less than 2 complaints a day. Factor out AT&T, and, hey, those complaints are cut in half.

    Complaints over the Do Not Call list were in the 50,000 range -- and from my personal experience that was an absolute success (no more annoying calls).

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  2.  
    identicon
    Oliver Wendell Jones, Jan 29th, 2004 @ 6:27am

    Ripped off

    I've got a 2-phone shared minutes plan that I just started and I'm being charged $1.10 per phone, or $26.40 per year for a "Number Portability Fee".

    I did not port my number, nor do I plan to port my number at any time in the future, yet I'm being fined/taxed by my cell provider for service that apparently their not even ready to provide?

    That doesn't seem right.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]


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