Overused, Misused Nano Becoming Pervasive Prefix

from the welcome-to-nanodirt... dept

A topic that we've discussed a few times before, but which the press is finally realizing (though, they'll ignore it in the very next article about some "nanotechnology" company) is the fact that the "nano" prefix is being constantly misused. Companies everywhere are suddenly including the term "nano" in their company or product names, even if the products have little to do with real nanotechnology. At best, they're usually just dealing with chemistry. At worst, they're not even close to nanotechnology. However, these companies (or, at least, their marketing departments) think that it makes them seem more cutting edge, and in some cases it's working.


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  1.  
    identicon
    Anonymous Coward, Aug 4th, 2003 @ 3:39am

    Such as Crichton's "Prey" novel

    If the "nanomachines" in that novel are the size of human cells as he said, then they would have to be on the micrometer scale, and considerably larger than most bacteria.

    Our environment is already filled with trillions of non-living, self-replicating nanomachines that destroy living cells, and some of them are killing people by the millions.



     

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  2.  
    identicon
    Munich, Aug 4th, 2003 @ 8:43am

    Remember "i" and "e" ".com"

    Reminds me of the late '90s. Every company being funded - and even a few established ones - started adding "e" or "i" or ".com" to their names and went public, or saw their stock go through the roof - even if the business had nothing or little to do with the internet.

    This will be a trend as long as both the government and VCs advertise that they are funding "nanotech".

     

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  3.  
    identicon
    tobias d. robison, Aug 4th, 2003 @ 1:20pm

    NanoDiva

    I'm waiting for some inconsequential singer to decimate her weight and then make the quantum jump to becoming a nanoDiva.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]


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