TV Commercials Go Online

from the misunderstanding-the-medium dept

I've complained before about the rise in annoying TV-style commercials embedded in web pages. Just yesterday I had to hunt through a series of open browser windows to figure out which one was yelling at me (and it was yelling). When I finally figured out which one it was, I tried pressing the "stop" button displayed with the ad, and that did nothing. I finally found the "mute" button, which shut it up until the page automatically reloaded and the commercial began again. Needless to say, I don't have very positive feelings towards the product being advertised. It sounds like these sorts of ads are only going to get worse. Advertising execs who still can't understand the nature of the internet, and who don't want to waste any more creative effort on designing different ads for the internet, are increasingly just throwing their TV commercial online. They're not doing this in a smart way, like Honda did, by creating compelling and entertaining advertising that people want. They're just doing it because they seem to think that disruptive and intrusive advertising is a good thing - rather than something that gets a negative response from people. Furthermore, as people are finally making it clear they don't like bad and irrelevant TV commercials, these execs are taking the backwards step of assuming that means they just need to shove out more of these ads people don't want. The smart advertising exec would realize (like Honda did with their commercial and BMW did with BMW films) that advertising is free content and people get online to get free content - so if you make it good, relevant, and entertaining, people will come and search it out. Unfortunately, those same execs seem to think that if it's "good, relevant, and entertaining" then it's no longer a promotion, and it's something they should charge for.


Reader Comments (rss)

(Flattened / Threaded)

  1.  
    identicon
    aakarsh, Aug 12th, 2006 @ 8:42am

    hey

    are you ediyouts

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  2.  
    identicon
    Paul Klein, May 6th, 2007 @ 1:49pm

    Obnoxious pinheads.......

    Whenever I need to mute a commercial (TV, Internet or otherwise) - I make it a point to notice who the offender is so that I do not inadvertently purchase their product... These obnoxious pinheads can go piss up a rope for all I care.
    I'm thinking of suing for the mental stresses that they incur to me incessantly throughout the day. In fact, we should all sue irregardless of the chances of winning the cases... Perhaps lost revenue in the courts may deter their greedy, piggy little fingers! It seems the almighty dollar is the only thing they care for - They certainly don't care about us...

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  3.  
    identicon
    siddharth, Jul 19th, 2007 @ 12:39am

    is t.v good

    t.v is not good

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  4.  
    identicon
    adam narcross, Oct 3rd, 2009 @ 3:54pm

    TV Commercials

    If the point of the article is to suggest, somehow that there is a "good" way to advertise online in the form of "content." I'm afraid the writer missed out on a very, very important point about internet commercials, which is THERE IS NO SUCH THING AS A GOOD COMMERCIAL. No amount of content can satisfy that really annoying feeling i get when they interrupt the video I'm watching. Its intrusive, not inviting, its mercenary not meaningful and its done out of complete contempt of the viewers. Like a lot of peopl, when I see a commercial in the movie theater or online, I make a note NOT TO BUY THAT PRODUCT, and I spread it around to my friends not to buy the product either.
    The whole point of going online to watch let's say a TV show or anything else was to escape the eternal interruption of commercials that have now made TV impossible to watch.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]


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