Even When Not On A Phone, Mobile Phone Users Are More Distracted

from the distracting-personalities dept

Joe Schmoe writes "According to an analysis by the USA insurance company, Response Insurance of their national driving survey, people who use cell phones when driving are more likely to be distracted from the road even when they are not talking on a phone. The results indicate there may be a "distracted-driver personality" type behind the wheel..." Basically suggesting that those who use mobile phones are just naturally distracted, and banning mobile phones in cars doesn't necessarily make a difference. I'd want to see a lot more information on this study before I bought the conclusions, though. They seem a bit far-fetched. Update: Meanwhile, it turns out that, in Germany, it's completely legal to have sex while driving. If that's not "distracting", I'm not sure what is.


Reader Comments (rss)

(Flattened / Threaded)

  1.  
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    grier, Jul 2nd, 2003 @ 5:07pm

    No Subject Given

    Yeah - It's called busy people trying to do too much at once. Almost got run over by one on the way here.

     

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  2.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Jul 2nd, 2003 @ 10:07pm

    Drunk Driving Analogy

    People who drink when driving are more likely to be distracted from the road even when they are not drinking. The results indicate there may be a "distracted-driver personality" type behind the wheel, therefore drunk driving should be OK.

    Back in the 80s, when "Real Men Don't Eat Quiche" was a bestseller, conservatives used to argue that drunk driving should not be outlawed. The Candy Lightner story changed national opinions. Perhaps we'll have to have future Candy Lightner equivalents to get the point across. I'm waiting for the 16-year-old blabbering on a cell phone to plow into a school bus stop and kill 7 kids, then keep talking.



     

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  3.  
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    slim, Jul 3rd, 2003 @ 7:39am

    Make no mistake

    ... this is an insurance company laying the groundwork to go to state regulators to ask for a rate increase for all people who OWN mobile phones, because, "as the research shows" mobile phone users "are more easily distracted" and thus, will have more wrecks, whether or not the person USES the phone while driving.

     

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  4.  
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    Glenn, Jul 3rd, 2003 @ 8:01am

    illegal here?

    Does that mean it's illegal to have sex while driving in the US? That would almost (almost!) be a funny enough ticket to have to justify getting caught.

     

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  5.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Jul 3rd, 2003 @ 9:08am

    Re: illegal here?

    You'd get arrested for a felony charge of reckless driving, so that you can laugh about it in jail.

     

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  6.  
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    Joe Scmoe, Jul 3rd, 2003 @ 9:51am

    Re: illegal here?

    ...and your new "girlfriend" ;)

     

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  7.  
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    drunk driving, May 13th, 2004 @ 8:27pm

    Re: Make no mistake


    DWI, drunk driving, DUI, and a license to drink.
    madd, sadd, radd, A.A., and Alanon related.

    Copyright: 1993-2004 Bruce Alm

    The answer to the problem of drunk driving, etc. could be this; a permit for the purchase and consumption of alcohol beverages.

    This would not only be a major assault on the problem of drunk driving, but would also have an effect on virtually all other crimes such as these;
    murder, rape, assault, burglary, robbery, suicide, vandalism, wife beating, child beating, child molestation, the spread of aids, college binge drinking, animal cruelty, etc., the list is endless.

    If this proposition was made law, there could be a major reduction in all these areas of concern, even though the emphasis concerning alcohol abuse seems to be drunk driving in particular.

    There could also be many other positive results;

    families healed, better work performance, booze money spent on products that would help the economy (we've all heard of the guy who spends half his check in the bar on payday,) would spare many health problems, etc.

    This new law could go something like this:

    Any person found guilty of any crime where drinking was a factor would lose the right to purchase and/or consume alcohol beverages.

    For a first misdemeanor, a three year revocation. a second misdemeanor, a ten year revocation. a third misdemeanor, a lifetime revocation. Any felony crime, an automatic lifetime revocation.
    Anyone caught drinking alcohol without a permit would receive a possible $1000 fine and/or jail sentence. those who would supply alcohol to people without a drinking permit (and possibly make money at it,) would also lose his/her right to purchase alcohol beverages.

    What wife or husband would buy an alcoholic spouse a bottle?

    What friend would give a problem drinker a drink at the possible cost of a thousand bucks and the loss of their own privilege? This could be a total discouragement to these would-be pushers.

    This permit doesn't seem as though it would be a problem to put into effect. It could simply be a large X, or whatever, on the back of any drivers license in any state, to show who has been revoked, and cannot purchase alcohol.

    Most people of drinking age have a driver's license, but one area that might be a problem could be New York City, where many people don't drive.

    This problem could be resolved, however, by a license-type I.D. specifically for the purchase of alcohol beverages. Most, if not all states have these already for the purpose of identification.
    This could be a small price to pay for the saved lives of thousands of Americans each and every year.

    After this, it would simply be a matter of drinking establishments checking I.D.s at the time of purchase.
    In the case of crowded bars, they could simply check I.D.s at the door, as they do now.

    Would this be a violation of rights?

    There can be no argument here since they already check I.D.s of people who look as though they may not be old enough to drink.

    This could be a good saying, "If a person who doesn't know how to drive shouldn't have a license to drive, a person who doesn't know how to drink shouldn't have a license to drink."

    Here are some other pluses to this idea:

    A good percentage of people in correctional institutions are there because of alcohol related offences . Because of this, court, penal, and law enforcement costs could drop dramatically.

    The need for A.A., ALANON, MADD, SADD, etc., could be greatly diminished as well.

    What the alcoholic fears most, is the temptation to have that first drink, usually a spur of the moment type thing. Without the ability to do this, he/she is fairly safe. To start drinking again would almost have to be planned in advance. and to maintain steady drinking would be extremely difficult, in most cases.

    Even though A.A. members as a group don't become involved in political movements, it seems as individuals, they would all be in favor of a situation like this. Any person who wants to quit drinking, even if never having been in trouble with the law, could simply turn in their license for the non-drinking type.

    A woman from MAAD, on the NBC TODAY show, said "One out of every ten Americans has a drinking problem, and that 10% consumes 60% of all alcohol beverages sold in the U.S.."
    If this is true, there could be financial problems for breweries, liquor stores, bars, rehab centers, etc., as well as lawyers, massive amounts of tax revenue 'down the drain,' and so on.
    But it doesn't seem as though anyone would have a valid argument against a proposal such as this for financial reasons. To do so would be morally wrong, and could be likened to a drug-pusher attitude.

    Even with the problems this new law could present, it still could, in one sense, be considered the simple solution to the number one drug problem in the U.S. and elsewhere. Alcoholism.

    P.S.

    What ever happened to the skid row drunk?

     

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  8.  
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    Rabid Wolverine, Sep 6th, 2006 @ 2:50pm

    Cell phones and red cars

    I used to work for the 'Insurance Companies'.

    I've seen statistics that say red cars are involved in more accidents than any other color. I say we should outlaw red cars in order to reduce traffic fatalities...

    See where this goes? Why don't people own up to being responsible? If you've got to talk on a g#!@
    d!$# cell phone pull over and talk on the d!$# thing!

    What is wrong with taking 5 minutes out of your precious little 'scurry around' and accomplish nothing life? Is it really worth killing yourself or some else?

    I don't think so. Remember, none of us are going to get out of this alive so we would like to prolong the misery for as long as possible...

     

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  9.  
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    Tiffany Piner, Sep 15th, 2006 @ 9:21am

    mobile phones

    tell me anything about the mobile phones

     

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  10.  
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    Anonymous Cowherd, Jun 28th, 2008 @ 3:10am

    Link is 404

    The last link in the article is 404

     

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  11.  
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    Courtney, Jul 15th, 2008 @ 7:48pm

    Bull

    I have been driving for 13 years with a cell attached at my ear, no tickets no accidents!

     

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